Vinegar: One Person’s Magic Is Another Person’s Salad Dressing Ingredient

IN THESE TIMES OF MONOTONY courtesy of the coronavirus & political blowhards & summer heat I continue my quest to provide thrilling blog content here.  Thus I’m going to show you, my gentle readers, something so exciting I can barely contain myself.

YESTERDAY I RECEIVED THE ABOVE piece of snail mail that tells me I may enjoy life in the fast lane if I order Vinegar: The King of All Cures! by Jerry Baker, America’s No. 1 do-it-yourself expert.  This book of vinegar magic costs $31.96, payable in 4 installments of only $7.99 each. According to Jerry if I buy this book I will: “Never be stuck, stumped, or stymied again!”

BELOW IS AN EXAMPLE OF the kind of magical advice featured in Jerry’s book.  This glimpse into his book is quite the teaser, isn’t it?  As Jerry, author and exclamation point freak, says: “No job’s too big, no job’s too small… Vinegar solves ’em all!”

JERRY ALSO INCLUDED A TESTIMONIAL in the form of a short story about how Peter and Katie, a lovely married couple, made their home smell fresh prior to Peter’s parents coming over for dinner.  [Spoiler alert: It was a close call, but vinegar saved the day.]

AND WITH THAT I SHALL end this informative blog post in which I have confirmed we are still here, virus-free and healthy, while taking the opportunity to ask you the following important questions.

~ ~ ✅ ~ ~

QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

What magic is keeping you going these days? 🤔

Are you a liberal, moderate, or conservative user of exclamation points? And why? 🤓

Have any good salad dressing recipes? 😋

~ ~ ✅ ~ ~

Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Humorous. Adaptable. Charmingly cynical. Midwestern by chance. Kindhearted by choice. Fond of words.

183 thoughts on “Vinegar: One Person’s Magic Is Another Person’s Salad Dressing Ingredient”

  1. There is no magic keeping me going. I try to contain myself when it comes to exclamation points. Probably depends on my mood. (or if I’m writing about cats!) I’m a simple salad person. I have high quality balsamic vinegars that stand on their own so I only add salt and pepper to a splash of vinegar. No oil. If I have fresh herbs like parsley and basil I add those too. Yum! (Are 2 exclamation points too many? Should I ration myself?)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Kate, I like your explanation of your exclamation point usage. It does depend on someone’s mood, doesn’t it? I also like your idea about having quality balsamic vinegars around to use as salad dressing. Makes sense and would taste good to me, too.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Jill, is your co-worker related to Jerry, by any chance? A cousin who invested in getting his book published? 😉 Sure, try some vinegar on your wrist… what have you got to lose?

      Like

  2. Vinegar has its uses . . .

    Growing up, our neighbors used vinegar to soothe sunburn. We use it to splash in Cole slaw, potato salad, and macaroni salad and to mix up Good Seasons Italian salad dressing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Nancy, as a kid we used apple cider vinegar to soothe sunburn, too. I like vinegar in cold summer salads like you mention. It’s good stuff, but is it the end all to beat all? Jerry seems to think so.

      Like

  3. White vinegar’s good for coffee pots and dishwashers, and for window washing. Otherwise, vinegar’s good for salad dressing, pickles, and one pecan pie recipe I have: the best pie recipe ever, which requires precisely 1 tsp. vinegar. I’ve done it both ways, since I occasionally end up without vinegar, and I swear it makes a difference.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I love that you gave up exclamation points for Lent. I think that is inspired! I’m a conservative to moderate user of exclamation points, but I tell ‘ya Jerry do like his !!! on just about every other sentence.

        Like

    1. shoreacres, I know about the uses of white vinegar you mention, but I’ve never heard of putting vinegar into a pecan pie. I am intrigued, not enough to rush out to make one today but this fall when I do make pies I’ll do as you instruct. Why not try it?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The recipe I use is a bit idiosyncratic. It’s a French custard type of filling, made of nothing but butter, sugar, eggs, and vanilla. That’s probably why the vinegar’s called for.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. The magic of illusion is my go to drug……I tend to like creamy dressings so I tend to start with either mayo or Dijon and add from there. My secret ingredient is a dollop Worcester Sauce…

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m happily running on the magic of extra doses of good chocolate, summer flowers, and an apparently fabulous reading list – it turns out I’ve read a huge number of incredible books during this sequestering. Please note, I’ve carefully refrained from using my usual requisite number of exclamation points. I’m demonstrating my serene persona as opposed to my giddy delighted one that finds exclamation points to be essential conveyors of my enthusiasm.

    With regard to vinegar, it’s true my major use of it is to help dress salads. I find the idea of it freshening a home for an in-laws visit hilarious. On the other hand, I once used cider vinegar to rid my place of an overabundance of fruit flies. And there you have it, a free vinegar tip. No easy payment installments required.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Deborah, your magic sounds lovely and doable. Nothing like some good old-fashioned straightforward enjoyment to lighten your spirits, eh?

      Your ability to limit your use of exclamation points is duly noted. I appreciate how you are projecting serenity, but I wonder if you’ll need to use double the exclamation points on your next comment? To create balance in your life.

      Thanks for the free vinegar tip. As a frugal person I know that I won’t be spending $32.00 for Jerry’s book so any tips from my readers will be the ones I know about.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I think my grandmother used to mention drinking vinegar as a cure-all, if not her then someone from my childhood. I use vinegar to wash windows, and to take out the gunk that builds up on my handy little egg cooker thingy.
    Anyway: Work is keeping me going these days, but that’s not really by choice, unless I want to lessen my income. I use ! liberally in text messages, mostly because I can never decide on which emoji fits my mood. Salad dressing…used to make my own with various vinegars- now too lazy. I just open a bottle.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Deb, no kidding? Drinking vinegar as a healthy cure-all? I know about vinegar in cooking and salad dressings and in cleaning, but as for intentionally drinking it for health… maybe I’ll pass. [Or find something tastier than generic white vinegar?]

      I can imagine how your work is keeping you going these days. Such times in which we live! I relate to your indecision about which emoji to use. I worry about using the wrong one, too.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Vinegar is quite magic – I use it for a lot of cleaning jobs (when I do them), instead of fabric softener in my washing machine, in my stainless steel pans when they get that “rainbow” effect… and more. Exclamation points – I sometimes think I tend to overdo a bit, but sometimes an exclamation point is exactly how I feel. I discovered a recipe online for Citrus Tahini salad dressing, and I love it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Carol, I use vinegar for cleaning, but don’t know about using it for fabric softener in the washing machine. Interesting. I try to limit my use of exclamation points, but like you I sometimes feel like I NEED to use one to make myself better understood. Citrus Tahini salad dressing sounds delicious to me. Thanks for the idea.

      Like

      1. The vinegar acts more as a “whitening” agent in that I feel like it strips the unneeded chemicals from detergents and such out of the clothes. Don’t know that it does much softening.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Love it!!!!! I use vinegar in sweet and sour recipes, potato salad, and a stew recipe (I think, too lazy to go look!!!!!) Hardly ever use explanation points!!! (Might be over simplifying that response!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. dawn, you made me laugh with this comment and your liberal use of exclamation points. I don’t know about putting vinegar in stew, but why not? As Jerry says, it’s magical.

      Like

      1. It’s actually really good…gives the stew a little tart bite… now I HAVE to go look it up and see if it’s really vinegar in that stew! Please wait one moment…Why, yes it IS vinegar, and also dill pickles. Trust me it’s good! Austrian Beef Goulash: 4 large onions, sliced. 1/3 C butter. 2 lbs beef stew meat. 1 TBS Hungarian paprika. Dash cayenne. Dash garlic salt. 2 bay leaves. 1 TBS wine vinegar. Beef stock. Flour. 1 Cup sour cream. 2 dill pickles, sliced.

        Saute onions in butter in a skillet. Place in heavy stew pot. In skillet brown meat and add to onions. To skillet add seasoning, vinegar and 1 C stock. Simmer a few minutes and pour over meat. Add enough additional stock if necessary to cover meat. Simmer, covered 3 hours, adding more stock if dry. Stir 2 or 3 TBS flour into the sour cream until smooth. Stir into the stew, heat stirring constantly until the flour is cooked. Add pickles and serve with cooked noodles.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Oh this looks like a wonderful recipe. Thanks for finding it and sharing it here. I like any recipe that simmers for a few hours, allowing the ingredients to get to know each other. The dill pickles are an intriguing touch. When the weather cools and we get in a stew mood, I’ll try this.

          Liked by 1 person

  9. Hmm, I guess my protein shake/fruit smoothies are keeping me going combined with my intense workouts. Helps me relieve stress and sleep like a rock.

    I wash my kitchen floor with white vinegar and hot water (on my hands and knees, which my kids think is archaic but I know no other way to scrape up the dried up, crusted food). I buy my salad dressing.

    I would say when I am a moderate uswr of exclanation points when I write, but when my kids push my buttons I am a verbally aggressive user of exclamation points!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ernie, healthy food and exercise are your magic, eh? So lucky that you know what you need to keep yourself balanced– and that you can do what you need to do.

      I know that white vinegar can clean just about anything so I have no doubt it does a great job on your floors. Scrub on, my dear.

      I don’t use many exclamation points either when I write. I’ve not thought about how I use them verbally but you’ve got me considering that now. Will muse on that one.

      Like

  10. I use vinegar mixed with my dishwashing liquid in my kitchen brush scruby-thingie to wash and pre-rinse dishes every day, and it keeps my stainless steel kitchen sinks sparkling clean.
    I put white vinegar in my white things when doing laundry instead of bleach. It does a good job of keeping my whites white, but I also use super HOT water. My water heater temp is cranked up to HOT. I want my white things white.

    I used to drink a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar with 1 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice and water, but it gave me heartburn so now only drink the lemon juice.

    I love Balsamic vinegar. If it’s a really good one I drink a little neat once in a while and slurp up any remaining in my salad bowl. I may be weird though as I love pickle juice too, sweet or sour makes no difference I like them.

    Exclamation marks…I’m probably in the “use them liberally” category. I try to be aware of it, but fail often.

    Photography, trying to draw and paint-trying because it really is hard for me to do as I have very little skill in the drawing arena, and walking/hiking are keeping me busy, and hope and faith that it will all be okay is the magic that keeps me going.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Deborah, I didn’t know vinegar would keep a stainless steel sink sparkling clean. Now I have to do that. I hate a dingy kitchen sink.

      Another commenter mentioned using white vinegar to keep white clothes clean and bright. That’s new to me. I’ll try that, too.

      I know of drinking lemon juice in water to help your liver do its thing and to keep your complexion clear. Or at least that’s what they used to say. As for drinking vinegar, I’ll assume it’ll give me heartburn and pass on that idea. 😉

      The thing about exclamation points is that I don’t judge anyone for the way in which they use them. I noticed that Jerry sure did like them– and it seemed important to make note of it. Everyone communicate in their own ways!

      Your magic rings true with me. Hope and faith are big on my list of how I’m keeping it together. Ever onward, eh?

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Books are keeping me going these days….I’m lost in fiction. I am an excessive user of exclamation points!!!!! which I know is not a good thing as it can be very annoying to other people, but is a hard habit to break. I remember the 60’s when oil and vinegar was salad dressing, served over iceberg lettuce, then Good Seasons packets came along to spice things up. I cheat and buy my salad dressing from two restaurants, one is a raspberry poppyseed vinegrette, and one is a creamy buttermilk ranch, but since both restaurants have been closed for 4 months, I have resorted to making my own which is not as good, or the grocery store stuff. I wonder how many books he sells???!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. PS. I don’t use vinegar or even like the smell of vinegar, unless it is doused over french fries with plenty of salt…..I think that might be a Canadian thing though?

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Joni, I wish I could get more into reading these days, but I’m finding my focus is scattered. I’m pleased to know that you are able to read, though. Reading fiction is magical.

      I’d forgotten about Good Seasons packets. I remember them but didn’t like them, they tasted *funny* to me back then. I wish we had a restaurant that sold their salad dressings. Hope your two reopen soon.

      I cannot imagine how Jerry sells his book, nor can I fathom why I got the letter/sales pitch. It came to me out of the blue from what I can tell.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Swinged Cat, yep, you said it. But how many people do you suppose buy Jerry’s book? I’ve no idea why I got this letter, nor will I be buying the book… but it does make for good blog post fodder.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m more a fan of pre-vinegar, when it comes to drinking purposes. Also a fan of exclamation marks!!!! And, commas. Very liberal when it comes to commas. I edit more commas out of my writing than exclamation points.

    Deb

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Deb, I take your point about pre-vinegar + drinking and AGREE. I don’t use many exclamation points, but I do overdo the commas. I remove them, too, after I write something. They just sneak into a paragraph, don’t they?

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Dorothy, I’m sorry she passed at such a young age. Her story does not put vinegar in such a good light. Jerry may have forgotten to mention that story in his book. 🤨

      Like

  13. My mom used vinegar on our sunburns and to clean windows, coffee pots, the floor and oven (with baking soda added). I’ve used it for a lot of things my favorite being in a marinate for steaks but I’ve never, ever made a salad dressing from scratch.

    I’m a recovery exclamation point user, fall off the wagon on occasion but I manage to hit the backspace key most of the time when I do.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jean, I didn’t know you could clean the oven with vinegar and baking soda. I use that combo to keep the kitchen sink drain clear, following the fizzy with hot water to flush it down.

      I like exclamation points but don’t use them as often as many people do. I’m pleased to know you’re in recovery and that you can get back onto the wagon after you fall. Exclamation points can be addicting. 😉

      Like

  14. You’re on line so I had to stop and read. Magic and patience have left the house here. Maybe I’ll buy the book and see if vinegar will improve my mood. 🙂 I probably am a moderate user of exclamation points, but, hey, it beats screaming, right? I buy my dressing. Been there, done that, it’s not a big thing anymore. Good to hear from you, and I use vinegar in the wash for some cleaning too. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Judy, I hear you about lack of patience. I am finding myself less inclined to give the benefit of the doubt to many of my fellow human beings.

      I don’t know if Jerry has a section in his book about how vinegar will cheer you up, but considering how wordy the dude was in his letter I imagine he has a vinegar cure for everything.

      We buy most of our salad dressings at the grocery, but I’ve been thinking I need to make some at home. I have the time you know… 🙄

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly, Carrie. I couldn’t NOT read this snail mail and once I did I HAD to share it here. It’s a hoot and a half, as they used to say. I won’t be buying the book however.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Our magic here is sitting around the kiddie pool we got for the grands and putting our feet in. It’s actually the perfect size…big enough for 3-4 adults. I’d say I’m a moderate user of the exclamation point. I use it when excited or angry. The only time I use vinegar is with our 4 year old grandson. We do fun science experiments with vinegar and baking soda. Exciting!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Beth, I like the idea of a kiddie pool used by adults to cool your feetsies. We don’t have a pool, but if we did… fun!

      Now that you mention it, I rarely use exclamation points to express anger. I use them more to show joy or absurdity. Hadn’t really thought about that before.

      I use vinegar and baking soda to clear out the kitchen sink drain, which is science… practical science! 🤓

      Liked by 1 person

  16. The current administration has destroyed magic with all their “magical thinking”!! I am a liberal user of exclamations! Cause, why not? Life is short! Be passionate! As for salad dressing, it lost its magic in 7th grade home ec. Class when we made thousand island dressing from scratch: mayo, ketchup and relish😫 it’s still my fave but has lost its magical powers. Some things can’t be unknown🤣

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sue, made me smile with your comment. When I wrote this question I wasn’t thinking about The Donald’s propensity to avoid reality + responsibility with his magical thinking about coronavirus. Good point.

      I like thousand island dressing, which is about as non-vinegary as a salad dressing can be. Jerry probably doesn’t mention it in his book, I’d suppose.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I didn’t read your comments above, but I DO have to tell you that Bragg’s apple cider vinegar with the ‘mother’ in it is GREAT for uric acid kidney stones and gout. It breaks those uric acid crystals down, and softens them first. Stuff tastes nasty, but it CAN cure those maladies!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Silver in AZ, a couple of commenters have mentioned Bragg’s. I’m aware of it but didn’t know what it could do for a person. Somehow I suspect that Jerry’s book about the magic of vinegar probably doesn’t suggest a particular vinegar like Bragg’s. Thanks for the information.

      Like

  18. I tried Bragg’s apple cider vinegar for Rheumatoid Arthritis several years ago, and sadly it did not help. I took a shot of it every morning. Then I had to switch to drinking it with a straw because it was hurting my teeth. But still, did not help. I have friends who it DID help (not necessarily with RA, though), and it’s cheap and no real side effects (other than teeth getting sensitive), so why not try it?

    I have several recipes that call for a splash of vinegar at the end, black bean chili and split pea soup both come to mind. Our favorite vinaigrette recipe is:

    3 Tbsp Balsamic vinegar
    2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
    1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
    2 garlic cloves, minced

    Whisk together, then slowly whisk in:
    1/2 cup olive oil

    Salt and pepper to taste.

    It’s really good, very easy, and keeps well in the fridge. Take it out 15 minutes before you want to use it, and of course, give it a good shake. I keep it in a little mason jar with a plastic lid that I bought at the hardware store, because the metal ones used for canning get rusty. The lids were a very recent purchase, and I was thrilled, I had no idea they sold such a thing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. J, I know Bragg’s is a thing and that many people have had good experiences with it. I’d guess that drinking it every morning is an acquired taste, but worth it if it does you some good. Sorry it didn’t work for you.

      Thanks so much for the vinaigrette recipe. It sounds exactly like something we’d enjoy. Pretty much if you can add Dijon mustard to something we like it.

      I don’t know about plastic lids for mason jars and, of course, now that I do I need to find some. I can see how they could be useful and practical. The things I learn here!

      Like

  19. I got so carried away discussing vinegar, I forgot to chime in on exclamation points. I try not to use them unless I find them warranted, but find that they add a friendly tone to a text message. So if my daughter texts me and asks me to pick up grapes while I’m at the market, and I say, ‘OK’, she might think I’m annoyed, but if I say, ‘OK!’, she knows it’s fine. Easier sometimes than finding the smiley emoji without my reading glasses, but not always.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good point about how the tone of a message changes with the addition of an exclamation point. I have difficulty getting those emojis to show up where and when I want them so an exclamation point fills the bill.

      Like

  20. Lordie. That whole vinegar business has been circulating since I was a child, and that’s a LOT of years!

    QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

    What magic is keeping you going these days? Well since I don’t drink (alcohol) nor do drugs, I guess it’s chocolate cake. Yes. The ‘magic’ of chocolate!! 😛

    Are you a liberal, moderate, or conservative user of exclamation points? And why? Moderate to conservative. I was taught/told that the exclamation point is for emphasis. One or two does the job as well as fifteen. But some folks like over-sharing, don’t they?

    Have any good salad dressing recipes? Balsamic vinegar, a little olive oil and shake. Pour over virtually ANYTHING and it’ll taste better because of the addition (exception: Chocolate cake. That doesn’t need improving). But pour that dressing over fresh garden ripe tomatoes? You’ll have a party in your mouth guaranteed! Add some freshly baked bread and maybe a little fresh mozzarella and basil and OMG. You got dinner. Al fresco and everything. 😆

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Melanie, I don’t know why I got this particular snail mail, but it did give me a good laugh and an insight into something sweetly wacko.

      Chocolate cake is good magic. Haven’t had any in quite a long time, now that I think about it.

      I learned the same rule about using an exclamation point. Fewer are better than more. But like you said, some folks just have to be emphatic, over and over again.

      I like your simple approach to salad dressing and your suggestions about where to use it. It all sounds delicious to me. I need to become more familiar with balsamic vinegar. A new goal!

      Like

  21. My husband’s food is magic. My pets are of great comfort. My kid hovers between hilarious and exhausting, and so I think that’s a wash.

    But I guess none of my magic compares to the power of vinegar!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. AutumnAshbough, you’re fortunate to have your husband’s food. Mine is a good cook, but he makes nothing like the meals your husband creates. As for the kid, sounds about right.

      So true about the magic of vinegar. We can only hope to attain such a level of perfection IF we buy Jerry’s book, something that’s not going to happen in this house.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I never realized vinegar was such a cure-all. I know it keeps my coffeemaker clean. Does it also fold laundry and wash dishes?

    What keeps me these days? Prayer, water, coffee, Reese’s peanut butter cups. 😄 I would say vinegar, but I don’t have any.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. L. Marie, I, too, was amazed to learn that I could buy a book that’d reveal the magic known as vinegar. Difficult to pass on this opportunity, but I did.

      I haven’t had a Reese’s PB Cup in months now. I can understand how they are helping you keep it together. My preferred treat is a Rice Krispie Treat, equally devoid of nutritional value but oh. so. emotionally. satisfying.

      Like

  23. Ally, I would have answered sooner but I had to get my order off for my magic vinegar!!!!!!!!! 🙂 Vinegar does have lots of uses, as does baking soda, but I think Jerry is over-stating its uses by at least a tiny bit. My husband was using Bragg’s for health reasons for a bit, although it didn’t seem to work, but he initially took a swig on its own. Do NOT try that (add many exclamation points here.) And then exclamation points. I don’t normally use that many but I have to work at it after being online where they seem to grow unchecked. It’s much like “Great post” or “Stunning shot” for every comment. I sometime use a thesaurus to try to avoid the normal words.

    Oh, the magic. Walking regularly so I can be outside. Reading copiously, although I did that before, taking care of groceries and things for my parents, and right now, getting ready to drive to Wyoming for vacation!!!!!! (Exclamation points fully intended.)

    Happy Tuesday.

    janet

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Janet, you made me laugh. Thank you. And when you get your copy of Jerry’s book, have read it cover to cover, you’ll write a review of it on your blog?

      I’ve seen Bragg’s on the shelf and promise to not guzzle it should I need to take it for some ailment. As of yet I know not what that ailment might be.

      Exclamation points are a funny thing. I’m finding some people have strong opinions about them, while I can honestly say I am completely indifferent to them. That being said, I did notice that Jerry likes them more than most authors I’ve read.

      Walking is good magic, you’re right about that. Enjoy your vacation in Wyoming. I’ve never been there but hope to see it someday.

      Like

  24. I use white vinegar to clean out our coffee pot but other than that I like a good balsamic vinegar and olive oil to dip my french bread in Italian style and I love raspberry vinaigrette as a salad dressing. I’m trying to limit my use of exclamation points but it is difficult because I get excited 🙂 Happy July to you Ally!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet, I need to look into balsamic vinegars. We have had some but I never got in the habit of buying them. Using exclamation marks comes easy, doesn’t it? Emojis haven’t taken the place of exclamation marks which is what I thought would happen!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Norm, you are clever! Didn’t think of that idea, but I’m betting that the book might not have that particular slant to it. To me Jerry’s book sounds like it is more apocryphal than scientific. Just saying…

      Liked by 1 person

  25. “Never be stuck, stumped, or stymied again!” — I wonder if this applies to writer’s block.

    I haven’t seen junk mail like that in ages. That belongs in a museum!

    What magic am I up to? Making time fly somehow (don’t quite understand my magic powers there yet), cooking with Martha, putting letters together to make words/sentences/paragraphs/whole works of writing. That last one is my favorite magic.

    I am anti-over-exclamation pointing.

    No good salad dressing recipes yet, but Martha has one in tonight’s recipe. I’ll report back.

    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tara, you ask a good question. Jerry makes quite an assertion with his statement. How far does vinegar magic go? Can it solve writer’s block? 🤔

      Writing is a kind of magic, I agree. It makes time fly and seems to not need any vinegar to make it happen. Of course, I didn’t buy the book so I could be wrong. I’m happy to read that you’re making wordy progress.

      Enjoy your time with Martha. I know you two girls make the best things to eat. You tell me it is so, so it must be.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Vinegar may indeed help with writer’s block. I’m thinking now of my homemade Big Mac sauce for burgers and, well, it has vinegar in it, and I’m writing A LOT. Coincidence?

        I would never fib, especially about cooking and Martha (though she has been known to lie and received a special orange jumpsuit for doing so!).

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Tara, I follow your logic and believe you’ve come to the proper conclusion regarding vinegar and writer’s block. OBVIOUSLY, there is a direct correlation.

          Still hanging with Martha, are ‘ya? She may be a good influence on you. 😋

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Martha taught me how to make homemade pasta sauce. I shall teach her how to wear something other than a buttoned-down shirt and not to lie to the FBI. Win-win.

            Liked by 1 person

  26. It’s pretty disheartening to think how many people will be conned out of $31.96 for a book full of either BS remedies or things (such as cleaning solutions) easily found on the internet.

    Magic to keep going? No magic, per say, but I’m finding it remarkably easy to fill my days.
    Exclamation points? I’d say moderate. I know I use them too much at times, but some sentences just look so ordinary without them.
    Salad dressing? Like several people have said, I love a good quality (unfortunately, expensive… but you get what you pay for) aged balsamic vinegar.

    Good to know that you and Zen-Den are keeping virus-free and healthy! (See, that sentence was just crying out for an exclamation point).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janis, I thought the same thing. Jerry’s book is pricey considering you can do the research yourself if’n you need to know about vinegar. I don’t know who’ll buy his book.

      I need to investigate more about balsamic vinegar. We have some here at home in the pantry but I don’t use it often. I don’t think it’s the best quality so that may explain it. Or maybe it is that I just forget about it. That explains it, too.

      I like your use of the exclamation point. I agree that there are sentences that look wrong without one. Gotta have a bit of fun with punctuation every so often! Words to live by.

      Like

  27. Omg, I’m dying of jealousy that I didn’t receive that gem! Even though I hate vinegar, it’s priceless marketing.
    I like to think I’m a moderate user of exclamation points but sometimes when I proof read my posts I realize I may get carried away.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rivergirl, I have no idea why I got this snail mail marketing letter. It’s a throwback to another era when such things were common.

      I’m a moderate to conservative user of punctuation marks. Like you when I proof what I write, I often remove some of them. Enough is enough I say to myself.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Who knew that vinegar could cure everything?
    My grandma used to use vinegar to clean but then the house would smell like eggs when you would come back home.
    I mean, I guess it could smell like worse things.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Kari, considering this snail mail was unsolicited I was truly amazed to find out about the magic of vinegar. Like you I know about using it to clean, but Jerry knows so much more about it, all of which is revealed in his book! 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Ally,
    Let’s see…Jamba Juice’s Berry Lime Sublime is a weekly treat these days. I just finished one. At home, I like club soda with a few splashes of red wine vinegar. I don’t know how that compares with apple cider vinegar, but it has no calories and it’s refreshing. Dr. Oz recommended. I’m getting better at limiting myself to exclamation points, though there was a time when I’d let them fly fast and furious. When I noticed I was doing that, I had to ask myself — when did I revert back to being a high school girl? So yeah. I’ve cut down. Dressing of choice these days — my husband loves this and I can get it from the grocery store — Panera Bread’s Fuji Apple Salad Dressing. It’s delicious!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mona, we don’t have Jamba Juice around here but your weekly treat sounds delicious to me. I love those flavors together. I’ve never heard of putting red wine vinegar into a glass of club soda. I’ll give it a try.

      I know what you mean about exclamation points and high school girls. I think that’s why I’m reluctant to use too many of them. I immediately think of high school cliques when I see a bunch of !!! in a row. I’ll look for the Panera dressing in the grocery. It sounds like something we’d enjoy. Thanks for the suggestion.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. I find that (much like my politics) how one sees me on the liberal/conservative exclamation point spectrum has much more to do with how one falls themselves. (I guess that would make me a moderate?)

    No salad dressing recipes. I’ve never been a big dressing fan to be honest. (I know, weird, right? Who eats a bowl of greens just to eat a bowl of greens? This girl.)

    I agree with Jerry, that vinegar is pretty amazing stuff. Maybe even magical. I use it for A LOT. I wonder what uses Jerry has listed that I haven’t tried already!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Forgot to add: As for magic – I’m into alchemy. Turning flour, water, and salt into something delicious and sun, water, dirt, and seeds into veggies…Mind blown magic.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Katie, well said about how you’re perceived vis-à-vis the political spectrum. I must be the same way, too. No one seems to think I’m liberal or conservative enough.

      My mother wasn’t much into salad dressing so I understand your desire to eat a bowl of greens, naked.

      Jerry’s book would answer your question about all the ways to use vinegar– should you like to invest $32 to find out, that is. I’m not going to buy the book even though Jerry was kind enough to send me a letter asking me to do so. Guess I’m just being standoffish.

      Like

  31. I grew up on vinegar and oil salad dressing. Exclamation points should be used sparingly. My miracle cure is the same as it’s always been: chocolate and alcohol. I thought this was another ad you found in a box in your attic, but was confused by the modern looking picture. Furthermore, wow. And also, one could simply google uses for vinegar without buying a book. My guess is the author hasn’t discovered google yet. Maybe if Sam Houston hadn’t smelled like vinegar, he wouldn’t have been married three times.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Betsy, I like vinegar and oil dressing but rarely make it. I don’t know why. I’m with you about conservative use of exclamation points but if they float your boat, go at it, kids. That’s not a hill I’m prepared to die on. Chocolate and alcohol are magical, no doubt.

      This mailing arrived here unsolicited it. I agree with you that a little time with Google and you’d find out more than anyone needs to know about vinegar, but Jerry doesn’t seem to be advocating that point of view. Can’t imagine why! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  32. No magic here.
    Jerry tried to sell me magic beans once…I’m not falling for the vinegar cure.
    With that being said, I do like vinegar-based salad dressings with some lemon juice and olive oil.
    I did a post a while ago about the over usage of exclamation points. We have some very excited people on the planet. I mean, on the planet!!!!
    I’m a moderate user. I feel like I actually use them when it makes sense. But then again, I might be doing everything all wrong.

    Like

  33. My mother had a set of spiral-bound books called “Heloise’ Helpful Hints” and whenever we had a mark, spot, stain – you name it, she’d go to that little library and find the answer. I still have the set here in the kitchen drawer. But the best use of vinegar that I do is mixing up “the recipe” for organic weed killer (1 cup vinegar, 1 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon of Dawn soap) into a spray bottle and apply in the heat of the day, preferably sunny. I finally got the Dawn soap, tried it once and it took all the pesky little weeds. This heat wave is making the year 2020 even longer (if that is possible)!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Linda, I remember those Heloise Helpful Hints books. They were filled with the most unexpectedly random solutions to problems you didn’t know you had! What fun that you have them now.

      I didn’t know about your weed killer recipe and I like it. Oh yes I do. Thanks for sharing it here. We’re having the same heat wave and I am so lethargic it amazes me, a known sloth. I don’t want to do a thing, stuck inside and bored out of my gourd.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, a treasure trove of hints and some blank pages where my mom wrote more tips on those pages. Try the weed killer recipe Ally. It doesn’t get the roots, but weeds will shrivel up and die within a day. Good for sidewalk cracks too. I have river rocks and lava rocks which are difficult to weed. The mulch, I just grab the big weeds, rumple the mulch for the small weeds. Just Google Dawn dishwashing soap and vinegar weed spray and they have breakdowns for how big a batch you want – you can use Epsom salts too. I use table salt.

        The heat wave is unrelenting and we had two unexpected storms yesterday and today – torrential rain which was needed, but they didn’t break the heat. That storm is Friday but next week will be even hotter: 100 degrees real temperature, not just “real feel” – ugh!

        Like

  34. Coffee, beer, Ben and Jerry’s ice cream, and long walks keep me going. I’m a moderate user of exclamation points. I tend to be excessive, but rein myself in. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Margaret, you’re doing a good job of finding your magic and of not overdoing the exclamation point. Balance, my dear. You got it!

      [Been having trouble when I try to comment on your blog again. TP does not like me. Probably still bitter that I left it years ago!]

      Like

      1. By the way, I love vinegary things, but straight vinegar? No, thanks. Word Press has kicked me off entirely; I can no longer log in with the user name and password that I’ve been using for many years. As you’ve probably noticed, I have to come in via google. It makes me use my full name too which I’m not fond of.

        Like

  35. Bit late to the vinegar party Ally Bean … such fun! Balsamic vinegar, now there’s a treat. That syrupy dark stuff that smells and tastes like magic. On fresh strawberries I kid you not. Like ground black pepper on strawberries. (I’m tempted to try balsamic vinegar on ice-cream, just need to get the ice-cream). Apple cider vinegar is hailed as a excellent health aid. I keep on buying bottles of the stuff meaning to take a tsp or 2 in warm water every morning first thing, but I procrastinate for months and it turns a deeper shade of pale. Out it goes, off to the store for another … and the pattern repeats itself.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Susan, no one could ever be late to a vinegar party! I know of balsamic vinegar but the kind I know of is not the best quality. I’ve had chilled strawberries with Grand Marnier Liqueur + freshly ground black pepper on them topped with a dollop of whipped cream, and it was divine. I like your idea of putting the balsamic good stuff on strawberries.

      I like apple cider vinegar when making chilled summer salads like bean or cucumber, but have yet to sip it daily for health reasons. You go first and tell me how that works out for you. 😁

      Liked by 1 person

        1. I took myself in hand earlier today and diluted some ACV in warm water and drank it. What fresh hell is this were my first thoughts (the saying attributed to Dorothy Parker and my now constant refrain).

          But I’m going to stick to it. I’ll have to undergo trials and experiments to get just the most delicious drink, eg adding fresh ginger and bay leaves. Plus, I hope it will aid me greatly in stiff shoulder and neck and some gentle exercise. And with a good diet and not my usual unbelievably bad eating habits, I may well return to my nearly normal.

          So there you have it. My own experience. Needless to say I went off onto a tangent post concoction and wondered how something that tastes so vile can be swallowed and metamorphosed that idea into politics et al.

          Hope you’re having a lovely weekend Ally Bean. Salaams.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. You’re a brave woman and I’m inspired to try this myself. I’d think fresh ginger could only improve the beverage. I could do with some sort of daily tonic that’d give me a bit of pep in my step. Lately I’ve not been doing much in the way of physical exercise. Between the extreme summer heat and humidity plus the ennui brought on by the pandemic, I’ve become one doozy of a lazy daisy. Happy Weekend to you, too. Enjoy!

            Like

  36. I am a recovering exclamation point addict! As for vinegar, that was the one word I could not pronounce at age four. Do not know why. Your posts cause many smiles during these days, Ally Bean.

    Like

    1. Kathy, I used to use more exclamation points, but like you entered rehab so that I could manage my addiction. I finally decided that fewer !!! were better than more !!! for me. Thanks for the compliment about this blog. I sometimes worry that my posts might. not. be. serious. enough for these times, but then I figure taking a break from our worries is good, too.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. OH! NO! This whole exclamation point issue is one that seems to trip us up.

          I agree that humor and seriousness need to be considered in balance. I try to do so, would that more people would do the same.

          Liked by 1 person

  37. Multiple exclamation points make me cringe. One serves, usually. I don’t use them often in regular writing, but I find them to be necessary in social media comments sometimes, or I come off sounding sarcastic or unfriendly. I sigh and add one in.
    I use vinegar to set the colours in clothes, and I clear out our drains with baking soda and vinegar occasionally. It definitely has its uses. As for the belly fat piece – if that were true, vinegar would be more valuable than platinum.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Arlene, when I see multiple exclamation points I immediately think of high school. We were so into having EMOTIONS back then, so we had to use !!! to express it. As an adult I don’t need to be so emotive.

      I clean our kitchen sink drain with vinegar and soda, too. Seems to work, and I didn’t even have to buy a book to know that. Great point: IF vinegar made you thin, it’d be much more expensive than it is now.

      Like

  38. The garden, dog walks and bike rides are keeping me sane. I definitely trend toward overuse of the exclamation point!! Adding red wine vinegar to pesto makes a nice dressing.

    Enjoy your sunshine days!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Eilene, I, too, find magic in the garden. Maybe we all do, but forget it at times. I haven’t been walking much lately, too hot + humid here. I’ll get back to that.

      The use of exclamation points seems to be a very idiosyncratic thing. I didn’t realize that before I posted this.

      I like your salad dressing recipe [concept?]. It sounds good and easy to me. Win-win.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. Our vinegar selection and sales have both increased in recent years… and now I guess I know why since it literally saves the day. Any book you have to buy on an installment plan has got to be completely worth it.

    I don’t know if Jerry covers it or not, but about the only real life science experiment I ever did as a kid involved vinegar. If you scratch the surface of a penny, then leave it sit in a cup of vinegar, it will slowly (over the course of about a week) completely dissolve the zinc inside the coin…. leaving you with a hollow shell of Abe Lincoln and his monument.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. evilsquirrel13, your reasoning about this book’s value is sound. I don’t know your penny experiment and I LOVE IT. What a fun thing to do and so totally worth doing. Thanks for the idea.

      Like

  40. My father-in-law is a big believer in apple cider vinegar, although I can’t see how it has helped.Like you my vinegar goes in my salad dressing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. KDKH, I know people believe in the healing powers of apple cider vinegar. I figure whatever floats your boat. In the meantime I’ll use the stuff to make salad dressing and unclog sink drains and clean the coffeemaker. I’m so pragmatic, aren’t I?

      Like

  41. Writing like Jerry’s makes me want to scream. It’s like being stuck in conversation with a folksy auctioneer from Texas.

    I thought all the vinegar hype was over and done with several times. It has its proponents, like those who think Vitamin E cures all ills or all they need for all cleaning jobs is baking soda. Every time someone tells me to use vinegar for something, it is a flat failure.

    I haven’t bought salad dressing in years, unless it’s Wishbone Robusto Italian as a marinade for meat and vegetables. That stuff is magic. I make my own balsamic vinaigrette or Asian vinaigrette with ginger and soy and rice wine vinegar.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. nance, Jerry’s letter is a throwback to a different time when our snail mail was filled with letters like it. I like your assessment of the tone of the letter, Jerry is a folksy TX auctioneer. Yee-haw.

      I remember the Vitamin E craze and I remember a previous vinegar craze. I’m sure both have their places, but maybe not center stage?

      We buy that Wishbone dressing for the same reason that you do. It’s magical, I agree. I need to get in the habit of making more vinaigrettes at home. I have the time, just not the inclination, I guess.

      Like

  42. I’m old enough to remember friends taking three tablespoons of vinegar a day to lose weight. I wanted to shed a few pounds, but could never bring myself to try it. As for exclamation points, I don’t use them much in my writing, but since becoming a blogger, I have found that I use them a lot in my comments! Because they make what I say seem so darned cheerful and important! Please help me stop this!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ann, I can understand why you didn’t jump on the vinegar/weight loss wagon. I dunno about that either. I agree that when it comes to commenting on social media a few exclamation points can make the comment seem more, for lack of a better word, genuine, she exclaimed!

      Liked by 1 person

  43. Don’t you just love what treasures the mail can bring?! (exclamation point offered for your enjoyment). For years now, I’ve added a bit of apple cider vinegar to my water because I was told it helped my GERD and indigestion issues. I suppose its worked because I really no longer have GERD or indigestion issues much anymore. So there is that I suppose.

    I am constantly monitoring my exclamation mark usage. But mostly in emails. Whenever I respond to comments on my blog, I find myself always using them. Oops. – Marty

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marty, I’ve heard of that idea about drinking a bit of vinegar to reduce GERD. Always wondered if it worked. Most interesting.

      The issue of exclamation points is personal and I’ve come to realize that people consider emails and social media comments to be two different animals. In emails, not so many exclamation points, in comments do what you will. Works for me!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Laurie, thanks for the link to the recipe. It looks delicious to me. I adore your answer to the exclamation point question. You know who you are and that is great!!!

      Like

  44. Magic to keep going? No magic, just get outside and start walking 🙂
    Exclamation points? I’d say low to moderate! (see I only used one in this comment)
    Salad dressing? Good old balsamic vinegar.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Natalie, your advice about going for a walk rings true with me. I’m the same way as you about exclamation points. I hadn’t thought on that until I read Jerry’s letter and realized some people are rather overly fond on them, imho. Many commenters have mentioned balsamic vinegar as their favorite salad dressing. I’ve not tried that, but when I can get some good quality balsamic vinegar I’ll try it. Sounds delicious to me + simple! [Notice judicious use of exclamation point.]

      Like

  45. Your blog posts do add a lovely and entertaining touch of magic to my world these days! I’m conscious of my use of exclamation points, I give them out freely just because I forget to go back and delete them. Note I left the first one, just for you ;-). Vinegar does wonders for rinsing off the molds and chemicals (if any used in the growing process) on fresh berries, just add a few tablespoons to a cold water bath for 10 minutes, rinse and drain well, let dry, the berries will stay fresh in the refrigerator for a good week to ten days. PS – Apple Cider Vinegar does better for health reasons than plain vinegar, but I don’t have a book to sell.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Shelley, I’m enjoying the exclamation point you put on your first sentence. It’s lovely, so vertical! Thanks you. 😉

      I didn’t know that about using vinegar to rinse off berries and will do that henceforth. Easy to do, healthful as well. That’s what I call a win-win. With this post I’ve learned so much about the uses of vinegar without buying a book. Sorry Jerry.

      Liked by 1 person

  46. I do love a good vinegar, but probably don’t need Jerry’s book (even though you made it look so entertaining). 🙂 The magic keeping me going right now are two little munchkins (grandsons) who are simultaneously wearing me out. That’s the paradox of toddlers. I am a conservative when it comes to exclamation points. I think that tends to echo how I am in life when it comes to expressing my enthusiasm. I’d like to be one of those people who can express great excitement, but I am, alas, low-key and quiet in my personality. As for salad dressings, I was just reading an article about the perfect vinaigrette. Apparently the ratios have changed. Instead of 3:1 (oil:vinegar/lemon juice/some other acid), the experts have declared that 1:1 is the new perfect. I actually like mine heavy on the acid since I have a great appreciation for all kinds of vinegar and lemony flavored things.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Robin, I, too, will not be buying Jerry’s book. I trust he’ll get over it, probably has a vinegar recipe for relieving disappointment so he can use that.

      Yes toddlers are a magical hoot and half BUT they have no pause buttons on them. ‘Tis a pity really, ‘cuz they do say some of the best things… if you, the exhausted adult, can remember them later.

      I was unaware of the change in vinaigrette recipes, but like you prefer the tang of a good one so I’ll keep on with the ratios I have. I wonder who decides these things? 🙁

      Like

  47. What a load of JunK (mail). Unfortunately, I’m afraid some people are so desperate they’ll believe it! I’m not a vinegar girl. It makes my tongue hurt (true story) so I can’t even use it for salad dressing. However, when we had a puppy I learned from our vet that if the dog peed on the floor and I cleaned it up with vinegar, the dog would never pee there again. Dogs HATE the smell. So, there’s that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam, yours is a valuable tip about how to use vinegar to your advantage. I’ve no idea why I got this snail mail from Jerry, but it did give me a chuckle. I won’t be buying his book but I wonder if your tip is in his book? A rhetorical question if there ever was one!

      Liked by 1 person

  48. You’ll live whip-smart and pain-free your whole life long!” Well then, I really must add more vinegar to my life!
    Posts like this keep me going…and defnitely brighten my day!! (She types, while also answering the quesiton about exclamation points!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Donna, yes, you know, if Jerry says it is so, then you know it is so when it comes to vinegar! I loved this letter, such a throwback to different times.

      I sometimes worry about posting light-hearted silliness like this post so I’m pleased to learn it brightened your day. Or should I say, day!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  49. Hi Ally, Very funny on the whole vinegar thing! For us, a sad event when wine turned into vinegar years ago. My magic around here? Reading posts like yours, Ally, that make me smile.🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Erica/Erika, wine gone bad is sad. I’m sorry for your loss, but trust you got over it. Thanks for stopping by to read this bit of silliness. After I opened the snail mail I knew I had to write about it here. HAD TO I tell you! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    1. June Lorraine Roberts, I’ve never had that cake, but wouldn’t be opposed to trying it because, like you said, cake! Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. Happy Weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

  50. Good job on sharing about the vinegar product – and the installment payment plan for vinegar cracks me up –
    Side note – I don’t drink vinegar but I know some people who do
    Use it (ACV) for health and they seem to get a lot from it (esp enzymes)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yvette, I rather liked the mention of the installment plan, too. In fact the whole mailing was worth a read and a chuckle. I know some people are into drinking a daily dose of ACV, so I’ll admit to being intrigued.

      Liked by 1 person

  51. Douching with vinegar (do women still do that?) is what comes to mind when I think of vinegar. And of course, the salad dressing ingredient. I never knew there were so many other uses for it!

    If I don’t keep myself in check I am a liberal user of exlamation points. It doesn’t take much to get me excited! Sometimes I will edit half of them out of what I am writing. No good salad recipes – can’t eat salad any more. 😦 I miss a good Italian oil and vinegar with herbs, though. Not sure if anything is keeping me going these days. Walks and yoga used to do the trick. Now, if anything, it’s my husband’s sense of humor. It can be a lifesaver!

    Like

    1. Barbara, I’ve learned a lot about vinegar since receiving this snail mail. Talk about a topic I’ve never explored before!

      You’re a liberal user of exclamation points, you say? Many commenters have mentioned doing what you do: put in the marks when writing, remove the marks when editing. I sense a pattern.

      I’m glad your husband has a good sense of humor. Mine does, too. I get what you mean about how it keeps you going.

      Like

  52. Why do I feel like Mr Jerry Baker lives in a gypsy caravan with “Miracle Tonic” painted on the side?
    In my experience, white vinegar is for cleaning, balsamic vinegar is for dressing and cider vinegar is for drinking during marathons to prevent cramps. Miracle indeed.

    Magic? Hm. Lolly bananas are my magic marathon fuel. How’s that?

    The author Terry Pratchett had very clear views on exclamation marks:
    “Multiple exclamation marks,” he went on, shaking his head, “are a sure sign of a diseased mind.” – in ‘Eric’
    Five exclamation marks, the sure sign of an insane mind. — in ‘Reaper Man’
    “And all those exclamation marks, you notice? Five? A sure sign of someone who wears his underpants on his head.” – in ‘Maskerade’

    Liked by 1 person

    1. MOSY, oh I do like your take on Jerry and where he lives! He has that vibe about him. I also like your way of thinking about the three types of vinegar. I’ll keep that in mind as I go along in life.

      Your magic sounds delicious to me. Ever onward, eh?

      I like Terry Pratchett’s views on exclamation points. I’ve never seen any of these quotes but love them all. I especially like the last one. I’d have no difficulty believing Mr. Jerry Baker does this, as part of his caravan sales pitch.

      Liked by 1 person

  53. You still get snail mail? That’s entertaining in itself. Even the junk mail – other than the recent run off election flyers and endless fold over post cards asking you to send for mail in ballots ( and oddly they are all ready filled out with choices made for you…hmmmm) the mail box slot in the block metal receptacle is pretty lonely -( too much theft – among other things like bank info, they are looking for gift cards people are sending kids and grand kids ). Good for posting flyers about lot cats.
    Sitting in the backyard under the tree shad late in the afternoons is nice – for some reason the yard gods make it a little cooler than the front and if there’s any breeze, we get it. Right now there’s the parade of squirrels headed to the neighbor’s fig tree to watch.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, we get snail mail. Most of it is political garbage, so it goes immediately into the circular file. We also get catalogues, often from companies we’d never buy from… but they insist on sending us their catalogues. This particular piece of snail mail was a wonderful throwback to a different time. Made me slightly nostalgic for more innocent times.

      Liked by 1 person

  54. Haha! Thank you for today’s laugh. I did not know snake oil salesmen changed to vinegar now. And gardening is still giving me magic these days. I do not think it will ever end. Glad to know you are staying happy and healthy!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Markus + Micah, yes, this snake oil dude is definitely into vinegar, as his snail mail showed me over and over again. I’ve no idea what list I’m on to have gotten this letter, but it was addressed specifically to me… so I know I’m important to them. 🙄

      Like

  55. Ah, vinegar. The ideal thing to make your house smell like pee.

    Magic that’s keeping me going? Colours. Paint. Cardboard.

    I loathe exclamation marks!!!! (She lied.)

    Salad wears dresses?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Val, ha! Made me laugh with your description of vinegar. I like your magic, it’s sensible and easily attainable. The issue of exclamation points is fascinating. I’d no idea people were so into them! My salads wear dresses, but to each her own.

      Liked by 1 person

  56. I would love to use vinegar in all it’s magicalness, but every time I have tried to use it as a cleaner my house ends up with fruit flies. I find that I use exclamation marks much more often than I should. I still struggle with being sure that the words get my point across without hearing the inflection of my voice..and so the exclamation point becomes my safety net. I do love a balsamic vinaigrette or a dressing made with red wine vinegar. I recently came across a recipe that added a dash of red wine vinegar to egg salad. It was so tasty!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Amy, huh. Fruit flies because of vinegar? I don’t know if Jerry addresses that problem in his book, and because I’m not going to be buying it… we’ll never know. I used to use more exclamation points but decided to cut back. I feel it has been a good idea, although I don’t know why. I love the idea of a dash of red wine vinegar in egg salad. I’ve not heard of that, but will try it. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

  57. Oh Ally! (note the exclamation mark!! 😉) You have the most interesting and off-the-wall topics. I love it!

    This post reminds me of the movie My Big Fat Greek Wedding. One of the running jokes throughout the movie was Toula’s father (played by Michael Constantine) who believed everything could be fixed with Windex. From the sound of this book, Windex would get major competition from simple vinegar.

    Of course I had to go to my cupboard and see exactly how many different vinegars I had – 6 of them. Can you tell I like vinaigrettes? 😏

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Joanne, like many of the topics I talk about here, there’s no advance planning involved. When I saw this piece of snail mail I knew it’d make a great goofy blog post. I mean, why did I get this? What list am I on that sends such things my way? How do I get off this list?

      I remember the father’s love of Windex in the My Big Fat Greek Wedding, a movie that was a hoot from beginning to end. I wonder what Jerry, vinegar superfan, thinks of Windex? 🤔

      Like

        1. True. Plus there are more varieties of vinegar than Windex, which makes vinegar more interesting overall, imho.

          Have you had your surgery? Being nosy here.

          Like

          1. Yes I did. It’s been 4 weeks now in a different kind of stay-at-home isolation. Today was very exciting – Gilles let me go grocery shopping with him 🥳 It was a hard sell because he said I would slow him down. I did. It was awesome 😁

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Ok. I sense you’re doing good. Just wondering. You’re healing and that’s great. Shopping isn’t all it’s cracked up to be unless it’s all you have to do in a day!

              Liked by 1 person

  58. Sheer determination combined with escapism seems to be the magic that keeps me going these days.
    I am a liberal user of exclamation points in writing and even more so in speech (though my punctuation remains invisible to those outside my head) as I am liberal with enthusiasm and easily excitable.
    I tend to buy salad dressings and many of them, as I do not believe in one dressing for all salad.I must say, variations on balsamic is my go-to. However, this summer, salad night (Monday) finds me in line at Panera for strawberry poppyseed. Mmm nom nom!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joey, magic is where you find it, isn’t it? Mine is not contingent on vinegar, but that’s not to say I don’t like it in salad dressing. I don’t use a lot of exclamation points having concluded that for me I feel like I’m being drawn back into middle school. Not good. We buy bottled dressings, but I do like to make a few of my own. Once upon a time when I was more of an Earth Mother, I made ALL of our salad dressings, ranch + French + blue cheese, from scratch. But I’m older now, so I buy them.

      Like

Comments are closed.