Flowers Of Yellow Make Me Feel Mellow When Words Escape Me

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It’s Tuesday, the day of the week when I plan on posting to this blog.

‘Tis a fact.

However, I’m finding that I have less to say than normal, words escape me.  Or perhaps I’ve become more succinct with my words when I use them.

In truth I’m becoming more relaxed, introspective about my current lifestyle.  All things considered I’m cheerful and content to spend more time at home;  I figure if this is how you stay healthy, why not become a hermit?

[Meant to be a rhetorical question but worth pondering.  How well are any of us adapting to this stay at home lifestyle?]

So in lieu of me rambling on here, attempting to write about my usual flapdoodle and twaddle, I’ll give you the following which is delightfully wordy and worth a listen.

On The Allusionist, a podcast by Helen Zaltzman, there is an episode called “Tranquillusionist: Your Soothing Words.”  It’s 10 minutes of unexpected aural mellowness while Zaltzman reads 343 words.

[Click on HERE to be taken directly to the page on which you can find the doohickey thingie that lets you listen to a podcast on your computer. Or follow The Allustionist on a podcast app on your phone and find the episode there.]

And with that, I wish you well, my gentle readers.  May you find ways in which to honor and center yourself while remaining safe during a strange time in the history of the world.

Live with intention. Engage with clarity. Share with joy.

Everyone doing OK under the circumstances?  

Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Humorous. Adaptable. Charmingly cynical. Midwestern by chance. Kindhearted by choice. Fond of words.

171 thoughts on “Flowers Of Yellow Make Me Feel Mellow When Words Escape Me”

    1. Jill, I know you look forward to seeing those little guys, so I’m happy for you and your sighting. They won’t be here for a few more weeks, but when they are I’ll think of you!

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        1. One year I didn’t understand how the hummingbird feeder was getting emptied every night. Raccoon.😡 I hang it higher now with a baffle as needed. The feeder not the raccoon.😁 Your raccoon was foolish to cut off his source.

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          1. Colette, this raccoon goofball took the whole darned feeder, scraped it with his claws, then started to drag it down the deck stairs into the yard. I startled him and he left it behind, but since then I’ve not tried to feed the hummers.

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            1. Allie
              Those raccoons ruin it for everybody! Last winter one took my suet feeder. This wasn’t your basic little square feeder either but the big, fancy cage-within-a-cage kind. Nowhere to be seen. I still can’t accept it!

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  1. Life goes on… even if we don’t actually go anywhere. Two of last years baby woodchucks reappeared yesterday, scrambling across the deck. Made me smile and look forward to spring… which is not quite here yet. Snow forecast for Thursday.
    🙁

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  2. Other than missing a weekly visit to a local pub for some takeout, I’m not missing much social activity. I’m guess my normal is closer to hermit than most.

    Trying to get outside enough to enjoy the signs of spring. I think that will help.

    Take care, Ally. Let us hear from you, even if it’s flapdoodle (love that word).

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    1. Dan, I admit that this current lifestyle is pretty much my usual. I don’t do lots of things, but I do occasionally leave my house and neighborhood under normal circumstances. 🙄 Fortunately I can still go for walks all over this huge subdivision and for that I’m grateful.

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      1. They have police patrolling the parks here, to keep groups from forming, but the parks remain open. The town north of us closed 27 parks as of yesterday, because people were still gathering there. I hope the folks around here can abide by the rules.

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        1. I’ve read a couple of tweets about parks being closed. Ours are open, but we live far enough out of the city that we’re almost exurbian, meaning we have a lot of space around here. Easy to stay socially distant.

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  3. The birds are waking me up now, rather than the alarm clock. It makes me smile.
    Carry on with the hermit-ing Ally Bean. Safe and well is the goal.

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  4. Today I am blue. Actually, it started yesterday evening. And there isn’t anything different about yesterday evening and today. In fact, today it is beautiful out and my husband is off work. He is “essential”. I try not to say that to him a lot so as not to give him a big head. I am ‘essential” too as I am the one at home handling the mental health of my girls and myself in addition to other stuff. I will be okay but today I am blue. But we are safe, healthy as of now, and we have each other. And I have blogs to read. Thank you. 🙂

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    1. Writer McWriterson, I’m not sure any of us can explain why we’re feeling like we are, one moment to the next. For me the sameness of the days at home has been alternately encouraging, then stifling– until now I feel mellowed out. Or at least today I do.

      I’d guess that living with someone who is considered ‘essential’ would bring with it a different set of expectations and realities than being at home all the time with your significant other, like I am. I know you’ll survive this day, but it does weary the soul living like we are now. Hang in there.

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  5. I’ve settled in, spring and blooming flowers helps. Yesterday and today, we’ve seen the sun shine and that makes a lot of difference. I enjoy being at home, in my kitchen, and the only thing that is really missing right now that I find difficult is not seeing my grandkids, the little jewels of my life. But I also know this will pass, and I have been lucky in that we see them far more than many grandparents do, so whining about is would be really silly, especially since there is FaceTime! So today I’ll putter in the garden, cook, read, go for a long walk with the husband and dog, take part in our church’s spiritual discussion group on Zoom, and maybe watch a movie later. I loved the Allusionis Ally!

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    1. Dorothy, I agree that blooming flowers are lifting my spirits, too. I look forward to daffodils, but this year our trees are more colorful as they’ve been blooming. Or maybe I’m noticing them more and just think they’re more colorful. Your plans for the day sound perfect for now, for any day actually– well, maybe better with grandkids, but that’ll happen again. Glad you liked the podcast link. I thought it was great.

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          1. I’ve always loved the word crepuscular because it sounds beautiful and immediately makes me think of a beautiful moment at dusk; papillon, and I love to say Ompompanoosuc, a river north of where I live. And discombobulate because my grandmother used it all the time!

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  6. Since I’m retired there isn’t a lot different here although I am missing my therapy trips to the garden centers. At first I thought my blog would suffer from lack of simulation but the very little I go out, I see stuff that is unusual from the norm. People are different too. They are either terrified or caring. There is no touching and I like that.

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    1. Kate, for me my days are close to my norm except that Z-D is at home working from our kitchen table. I like having him around and he seems to have adapted to his new workplace like he was born to it. I agree that people are different, too. Many are overflowing with gratitude and kindness focusing on solutions, but the other ones are more self-absorbed and whiny than ever. Guess which group I prefer to be around! 🙄

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  7. Reporting from Northern Ontario – all systems status quo. Waiting for spring, but a snowstorm is forecast for Thursday. As I say, status quo, for these parts.

    Be well be safe and be your kind and loving self.

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    1. Maggie, as long as the snowstorm is normal I imagine it is comforting. I’m all about focusing on what seems normal so as to not dwell on what isn’t normal now. Status quo, for the win. Stay safe, be well.

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  8. I’m not really doing much different than I normally do minus the appointments that would have kept me out and about—haircuts, dog grooming, doctor, dentist, a couple of lectures and lunch with the girls. I could manage much better if there wasn’t a stupid toilet paper storage. My thoughts about those causing it are none to charitable.

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    1. Jean, I agree with you and your uncharitable thoughts. I, too, am doing much of what I’d normally be doing, but even for me, an introvert, I miss going to my appointments or even running into the grocery on a whim. Still we are healthy and that’s the goal. Stay safe, be well.

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  9. A-OK, Ally ~> Minor modifications made without major mishap.

    This temporary lifestyle would have been tougher for me as a kid when I hung out with friends every day. Or as a college student when I wanted to party 3 nights a week. Now, no biggie. I go for a long walk in the morning, punctuated with some degree of discourse with fellow social distancers. (Not that anyone has anything to talk about.) We’re eating OK since we usually eat in more than we eat out. The only shopping I ever do is for food, so that hasn’t changed, except, you know, that the whole TP aisle is MIA. 😛

    Hang in there, Ms. Bean!

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    1. Nancy, I know what you mean about talking with people from afar, but having nothing to say. Although one neighbor who I wouldn’t know from Adam did charm me with her comment. I was out for a walk and as she walked by she shouted over to me: “nice to see you.”. I thought, how sweet. And how true. It was nice to be seen and be able to reply in kind.

      Stay safe, be well.

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  10. I’m enjoying cardinals and Canada geese by the lake. Also: ZOOM has been a life-saver, where I meet my Pilates gals and writers’ group these days. Yes, we get by with a little help from our friends.

    I didn’t appreciate the snake that slithered across the patio yesterday though. He didn’t bother to ask permission – not a welcome guest! Thanks for checking in with us today, Ally.

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    1. Marian, I’ve yet to see cardinals, but I look forward to their return. I’ve never used ZOOM but I know it’s all the rage. I love that you’ve found a way to stay in touch that works for you. I’m not crazy about snakes, either– but they do keep our chipmunks in line, so I attempt to be generous about their existence in my garden. 😑

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    1. evilsquirrel13, no doubt you’re right about the TP. And isn’t that a topic of conversation that you’d have never, ever though would be THE topic of conversation? Yet here we are. Stay safe, be well.

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  11. I’m largely OK, but I miss my people. And I miss being able to run out and about for whatever I want or need whenever I want or need it.

    Like everyone else.

    It feels selfish and wrong to even feel wistful when so many people have far more dire circumstances. And the level of frustration and anger (and fear) I feel when I see people not observing physical distancing, or coming right at me on my walk, making me move far onto someone’s lawn or into the street, bothers me.

    Thank goodness there are signs of Spring everywhere, and Good Things to balance out the Worries.

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    1. nance, I’m comfortable being at home, but I also miss popping out to buy something whenever I want to. I’m rather spontaneous when it comes to meal planning– or at least I used to be. Now, of course, all meals are thought out days in advance seeing as we’re shopping online.

      We don’t have sidewalks here, so there’s a lot of space on the streets to stay apart from each other. I can see how walking on sidewalks would be difficult and fraught with peril. I agree about the signs of spring. It looks like spring here now and that has been a balm for my tired eyes. Less gray, more green, please.

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  12. My “hermit-ness” is coming out full force with this “stay-at-home” time. I used to hide my capacity (and enjoyment) of being a hermit. I “made” myself go to events and meet for lunches/dinners and attend presentations as well as participate in my own. Now. I. Don’t. Have. To. (Don’t tell anyone this is how I feel – it’s rather selfish at this time.) Of course I go up and down in moods, and I miss seeing my family oodles. But I don’t mind being a hermit, walking in the woods and baking my own homemade bread (first time ever). Perhaps this emergency will teach us all to be okay with being ‘who we are’ once life resumes normally.

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    1. Pam, I’m a natural-born sloth and have taken to being a hermit like I was meant to be one. I totally understand about how you have to make yourself socialize; I’m the same way.

      I have plenty to do around here, little of it will change the planet, but I’m okay with that. I hope you’re right about how this pandemic will change perceptions about what is important to do– and what is important to not do. Do less, enjoy more is my mantra.

      Very impressed with you bread baking, btw. Yay Pam!

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        1. Feel free to chant the mantra to yourself at will. I’ll bake banana or pumpkin bread, but not up for trying yeast breads yet. Although I do have a recipe for beer bread which was pretty good. Wonder where I put that recipe?

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  13. “Live with intention.” I really like that short phrase that has ideas so big.
    Actually life around here has changed little. We worked from home /remote office years ago. I have come to like the grocery pick up as we are near one of the major stores offering it. They text or call about substitutes – they only problem I have is in the actual grocery store, if you remember you forgot to get something, you can just cart it back over to that aisle – it seems I alway think of a couple of forgotten items right after I click “place order” and you can only go back and add 4 items later (due to demand overload).
    And masks. now it’s advisable…and people are wearing them..but now it’s so darn hot!
    (Be careful with ZOOm right now until they fix the privacy issues – the schools are sending out warnings to students whose teachers are using it for classes instead of the more established/tested ones. The issues is ZOOM Bombing – hacking into it. Data grabs and other stuff – some people just have to ruin everything.)
    I’m curious how things will be once restrictions are lifted. Will everyone return to just as it was – or will the changes – some of the good changes continue?

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    1. philmouse, thank you. That simple little phrase popped into my mind as I was writing this post and I felt it might be encouraging to some other people so I tossed it onto this post. I never know what’ll resonate here.

      Thank you for your advice about how to do online shopping and curbside pickup. I appreciated it when we sat down in front of the computer for the first time. I see what you mean about a learning curve. Lord love a duck, is that the truth.

      I’d read about the downside to using ZOOM. I agree, wouldn’t you know someone would find a way to make it unreliable just when people need it to be reliable? People [can] suck.

      Like you, I wonder about the longterm ramifications regarding our time quarantined at home. I suspect that self-aware people will come out of this experience more well-rounded and secure in themselves, while most people will go back to being selfish and greedy and needy. Same as it ever was, you know?

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    1. AutumnAshbough, I can understand how having noisy boys around could send your words into hibernation. I’m finding myself not really in the mood to talk at all, perhaps having taken this hermit thing too far? 🤷‍♀️

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  14. I could live like this for quite a long time if only people weren’t sick and dying. I think this is a time of learning for many of us…learning who we are and what is truly important. Since I’ve learned that now, I hope the death stops soon.

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    1. Dawn, I know what you mean. I rather like how stressless my days have become while living the Sequestered Life. Of course, I cannot forget how many people are dying and struggling around the world and that makes me angry– but for the moment I shall remain happily inside my home. It’s the only thing to do.

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  15. A perfectly timed post for me Ally – I find I’m needing an extra dose of soothing today. I’m reclusive by nature for the sequestering isn’t the hardship for me as it is for some, but still, I’m finding I want to monitor what stimuli enters my world. Quiet and cheery are the order of the day for me. Love your yellow flowers!

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    1. Deborah, I agree with you about a need to monitor what I read and see. I’m finding that being a hermit seems to suit me, at least now. Thus not keeping up with all current events and all people is easier to do than I would have thought it’d be. Quiet and cheery, the way to go.

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  16. We’re ambling along much as usual, though hubby would prefer activities with friends and he misses his breakfasts in town. I walk the dog and do my PT and attempt to write. Can’t seem to focus on the books, but blogging fills a need for me. I’m just glad I live where I do – makes it easier. Oh yes, the first two daffodils bloomed yesterday. Yay for yellow flowers!!

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    1. Eilene, I think many people have found that blogging fills a need for them right about now. I find that encouraging and am glad to be part of the blogging community. My focus comes and goes, but that’s rather normal for me. I do think that for me yellow flowers are the best tonic. Enjoys your daffodils.

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  17. Thank you for the link to the soothing words. Very nice. 🙂 All is relatively well here. We’re safe, we’re healthy so far, and the only thing anyone might complain about is how I’d rather sit with the trees than do the spring cleaning I keep telling myself I am going to do. Since there are only two of us and the complaint department is closed for now, I’m not too worried about it.

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    1. Robin, I’m glad you liked the soothing words. I thought it was a link worth passing along. There are just the two of us here as well and now that I think about it the complaint department is closed here, too. All-in-all we’re as happy as two bugs in a rug can be, considering how much worse things could be for us. Grateful here, we are.

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    1. Margaret, perhaps you’ll discover that you like being less sociable? It’s what’s keeping us all safe, so I appreciate your determination to stay at home.

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      1. I’m not an extrovert, but I am very outgoing and a people person. I don’t generally have an issue being at home, but this is too much of it! If I lived with someone, it would undoubtedly be better. The cat is not the greatest conversationalist or hugger. 🙂

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        1. Your cat isn’t chatting with you? Gotta admit that I’m not surprised, knowing her history as I do. I’m sorry this stay at home lifestyle is difficult for you, but it is the best way to keep everyone, including yourself, healthy. So there’s that incentive to go with the flow.

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  18. As an introvert I don’t mind being home as much, and my life before was pretty quiet anyway now that I’m retired. I stay busy all day, writing, blogging, emailing, talking on the phone (more than I ever have!) and staying up to date with the constantly changing news. I have not yet resorted to doing my spring cleaning yet though! I only leave the house to walk or visit my 94yr old mom who lives a short distance away, (where I help her pit so she can stay in her home and I am glad she’s not in a nursing/retirement home as our only deaths here (8) all came from the same one), and the grocery store once a week, although yesterday I had to pick up prescriptions for my mom at the pharmacy but they brought it out to my car. After handling the bag I thoroughly disinfected though. Because I am walking, exercising EVERY day now I’m sleeping more soundly, both of which are good for your immune system. I think the people who are having a very hard time with this social isolation thing are those who can’t be still and just be. People who must be occupied at all times by something and now their choices have narrowed esp if they have no home hobbies. If you had offered me a month or two at home years ago when I was so stressed out from work, I would have thought it the most amazing wonderful gift! PS. I do still put my mascara on everyday, I bought an extra one in case this goes on long, and I do miss shopping for spring stuff!

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    1. Joni, you’ve got it going on there in the healthiest way possible. I’m glad your mother is safe at home considering what you said about your local nursing home. I didn’t know about a pharmacy bringing your scripts to the car, but will file that away for when we need our refills. I’m walking every day now, too. Not too far, but I’m getting out the door which is what it’s all about really.

      I agree that the people who are struggling with this quarantine are the extroverts who aren’t accustomed to entertaining themselves at home. As a lonely only child growing up and an adult introvert, I’ve had decades of experience about how to keep myself busy doing something at home. My husband is now working from home now so I’ve got him around to not do things with. 😉

      I admire your dedication to mascara, btw. I can’t wear the stuff, but I do put on a tinted lip balm each day– which is the same principle.

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      1. I don’t wear anything else, just the mascara and a bit of coverup for my undereye circles, otherwise I look like a raccoon! We had checked out retirement homes last fall but my mom said she wasn’t ready yet, and now she’s glad! Lots of outbreaks among the retirement homes here in our province of Ontario, mostly because the part time staff go from one facility to another working. The local outbreak was associated with a resident going to a church service where there was a group of people who had returned from Europe but who disregarded the notice to self-isolate after travel back in March – at least they think that’s how it started. Another outbreak was from people attending a funeral – all those church services are stopped now.

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        1. The spread of this virus is obvious. How selfish and self-absorbed must you be to disregard self-quarantine mandates when ignoring them threatens the lives of so many people? It makes my blood boil. Stay home, how difficult is that to understand? 🤨

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  19. Mellow yellow flowers are awesome. Thanks for sharing those. I’m irrationally annoyed today, a wee bit. But doing well overall. Just discovered Cool Ranch Doritos. Tasty! I could stay inside forever, but I couldn’t find a reliable salad delivery service that delivers in my area. If I ever get that, I may never go out again.

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    1. Tara, I have my moments of irrational annoyance, just ask Z-D. I understand how it happens, out of nowhere, things. aren’t. right. dammit. And one becomes peeved. 😒

      I’ve never had Cool Ranch Doritos, but then I’m not a fan of Doritos so it stands to reason I wouldn’t have had them, but you enjoy them all you want. Good luck with the salad delivery service. You’re dreaming big with that idea.

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      1. Yeah! Thanks for the support.

        I wasn’t a big Doritos fan either, but these came in the one snack box o’ chips and they’re pretty good! I’ll keep working toward my dream….

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  20. Doing well here! I saw a Downy woodpecker yesterday afternoon on my roundabout way to the mailbox, the Red-winged Blackbirds arrived, and I’m waiting for the Yellow-headed one to show up.

    Trying to keep it as normal as possible. I hope you’re doing well too.

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    1. Deborah, you’ve got your priorities in the right place. I hope your birdy friends arrive toot sweet. You’re depending on them to keep it normal for you. Stay safe, be well.

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  21. Since I have lived in SoCal my whole life, I guess I hadn’t thought about how lucky we are to have hummers here year-round. We started to get our annual visit from the beautiful yellow and black hooded orioles around mid-March, and the trees, bushes, and succulents are blooming. With so much beauty to be found in our yard and neighborhood, it’s hard to get too down for long. Hubby and I have managed to keep our senses of humor (so far 🙂 ), so that helps a lot also.

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    1. Janis, I’ve wondered what it’d be like to live all year in warmer climes, not watching the seasons change as dramatically as ours do. I think I’d be like you, unable to stay down for too long when it was pretty outside almost every day. We, too, have kept our senses of humor during this… so far.

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  22. All okay here, although I went to the grocery store today and there were more restrictions than last week and again no toilet paper in sight. Made me kinda sad but I’m determined not to let it get me too depressed. Your flowers are very pretty. If I can keep up the pace with the A to Z I’ll be fine – LOL.

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    1. Janet, I haven’t been inside a grocery for a while. We’re now doing the order online then pickup option. This is something I said I’d never do, but *hey* times change. I wish you well with the A to Z challenge. I’m not sure I could focus enough to make it happen, but you’ll do great.

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  23. Doing well here in AZ with walks in the morning, plenty of unpacking and organizing to do, a patio to sit on in the evening, boxes of books in the garage but using online checkout from the library and reading on my Kindle or iPad. I plan to not go out shopping until next week, as from what I’ve read, this week is critical. I don’t really mind, although at some point I look forward to getting out and doing exploring in our new area.

    Stay well!

    janet

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    1. Janet, in some ways I envy you. You have a clear purpose: unpack, move in, explore new neighborhood. That’s fun when you get down to it. I’m a bit more at loose ends, but I’m not complaining. We are well.

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  24. I’m doing okay – more depressed by what’s coming out of Washington than anything else. It’s terrible when your president is more frightening than a pandemic. We expect springlike weather in a few days and so I shall be able to carry on with some outdoor projects. Take care and thanks for the link.

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    1. Jan, yes, you’ve said it. The Donald is worthless and I refuse to attend to anything he says. I’ll keep on keeping on here, doing my best to socially distance. Not all that tricky when you think about it, considering the consequences when you don’t. 😳

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  25. I’ve added her podcast to my app. I’ll look forward to some shed time having a listen.
    I’m glad you’ve settled well into this change. I love that quote at the end. A great way to journey through life.

    The announcement came yesterday that schools will continue remote learning for Term 2 so I’m out of work for another term. I was expecting it but still feel a bit crushed. But I’m working on ways to stay connected to my school community. We all just have to adapt.

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    1. MOSY, I like The Allusionist podcast in general, and this particular episode is uniquely suited for now. I’m sorry about your school, but not altogether surprised considering what’s going on around the world. I agree that we all have to adapt to our new realities. And do so, quickly. Stay safe, be well.

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  26. Well, initially I didn’t see a big difference since I work from home and the only difference work-wise is my boss is also doing the same now, (though he’s been popping in almost daily for file materials and when he teaches class he uses his work computer to Skype with the students). Our stay-at-home/stay-safe edict will expire next Tuesday, but expected to be extended until the end of April. I’ve suspended my walk for a few days – the weather is not so great, we just had a very stormy day (thankfully the severe weather is done – we were to go to 1:00 a.m.) I’m a little nervous going to the Park, though it is not crowded but we have horrible stats on cases/deaths here not only in the City, but throughout SE Michigan. So I’m stepping back just a little – we’ll see how it looks on Saturday.

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    1. Linda, your decision to avoid the park for a little while seems sensible to me. I haven’t tried going to a park since this started, instead walking around our suburban neighborhood where people keep their distance or on bicycles moving quickly by me. As long as you don’t feel confident about your health regarding the transmission of this virus, I’d avoid walking in the park, too.

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    1. Susan, our weather is getting warmer and there’s more humidity. We’re finally seeing spring green leaves and pretty yellow flowers and blue skies. Of course it all seems completely normal, while living under completely abnormal conditions. Strange times, indeed.

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  27. Speaking of being succinct, I love the quote at the end. Words to live by!

    My ‘normal’ life involves seeing a handful of people who are meaningful to me, on a somewhat regular basis, for a specific purpose. Now, because of Zoom, I feel like I’m interacting WAY MORE than I normally would, in groups rather than the one-on-one I tend to prefer.

    We live in strange times, and strange behaviours abound.

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    1. Joanne, thank you. Occasionally my muse can be profound. Usually she’s silly, but yesterday she was feeling deeper.

      I’ve yet to try ZOOM and it does look like fun. Z-D has a meet-up planned for Friday. He and his buddies plan on talking about all the March Madness that wasn’t. If they can’t trash talk in person they’ll do it online… about something that didn’t happen. So, you know, *yay* I say. 🙄

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  28. Thank you for the tranquil podcast. I am more and more turning to meditation and focused breathing during these challenging and unusual times. That and gratitude are very helpful to me. So much to be grateful for.

    Tragically, things are going to get a whole lot worse before they get better and we all have to find ways to support ourselves and others around us as best we can.

    Peta

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    1. Peta, I sense you’re right. I anticipate more trouble ahead, but like you am trying to focus on gratitude and calmness. I can’t change the existence of this virus so I figure time to work on me, staying at home, being whole. Stay safe, be well.

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  29. I’ve embraced that I feel in quarantine what I feel out of it – some days are good, some days are not so good, and so it goes.

    I really like the picture you used. I love yellow flowers.

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    1. Kate, I think you’ve explained all of our emotions well. And so it goes about sums it up. I like yellow flowers, too. Glad you like the picture. Kind of snazzy, I thought.

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  30. Ally, the audio reminded me of a certain kind of relaxation yoga I used to do. You did a few stretches, then laid on your mat and the instructor said soothing words for the better part of an hour. I used to doze and drift. At the end of the hour, I practically floated out of the studio! Thanks for recommending! And yellow flowers are my favorite (but Hubby thinks they look like weeds)! 🙂

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    1. Laurie, your yoga relaxation session sounds divine. I’d enjoy it. I liked this podcast because I did drift a bit listening to it, which was a nice surprise to me. I felt lighter after listening to it. Yellow flowers can look like weeds, but they don’t have to look like weeds. At least that’s my take on them.

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  31. Lots of nice words in that podcast. 🙂 Rain has arrived here and is bringing in the wind and a cold front. On the positive, the oak trees are just about to go “poof” and the birds have all arrived.

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    1. Amy, I liked the podcast. There’s something refreshing about it. The birds are showing up here, too. I like oak trees, as much for the shape of the leaves as for the acorns. Our trees are still looking wintry bare, though.

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    1. Swinged Cat, good idea. I used to say that my purpose for blogging was to be a purveyor of flapdoodle and twaddle. Over the years I’ve evolved a bit from my original silliness, even allowing myself to be serious once in a while.

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    1. Amanda, you ask the question we’re all wondering about. I realize that eventually we’ll get back to something that approximates normal, but I think the old normal is long gone. Long live the new normal!

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  32. I feel much the same as you do Ally. I think the memes flashing in cyberspace about us all going through grief are correct. We’re all at different stages and we can/will work through them multiple times. On a brighter, lighter, note, I must say I love what you did with your photo – do tell, what software did you use? Hugs to you! Stay safe, stay well!

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    1. Shelley, it’s funny because I usually find something to talk about here, but as this quarantined life continues I’m finding myself less inclined to want to write about the deets of my life. Perhaps I fear boring people to tears!

      I used the Waterlogue App to make the image at the top of this post. I did it on my phone, but there may be a desktop version of Waterlogue, too. The app is easy to use and I like its various options for enhancing my photos. [In case you’re interested, I have a tag, Waterlogue App, on this post so that all posts with my Waterlogue pics can be found in one place.]

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      1. I can relate to your feelings about what to write about or not. I go back and forth about wanting to say what’s on my mind (then I do that) and what I think I should write about instead (then I do that).
        Pictures always seem to make the cut. Thank you for the tips and the info on the app. I’ll have to see if I can download it on my phone.
        I hope you’re well and staying safe!

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  33. I just want to get well. It’s much easier to work at my office. Otherwise, I would like instant upgrades to our technology so that I could literally do everything from home. In my well hours. I’m getting behinder & behinder. Sigh.
    Anyway, the family togetherness and regular lunch with my husband is delightful, I’ll say that much 🙂
    You’re never doing flapdoodle and twaddle.

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    1. joey, I understand your priorities. I want you to get well, too. I don’t know how telecommuting works, but maybe your company will get with the program. It’s odd, in a good way, to have lunch with your husband, isn’t it? I’m enjoying it, but it is so not normal.

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  34. Hello Friend, am as usual late, and it seems each next week, am later … yellow is a dangerous color for a painter. Too much and the painting is screaming, too little and it looks watery. Although I have to say, lemon yellow is more dangerous than Naples yellow, with a peach cast to it. Just came here to wish you a lovely Easter!

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    1. DrJunieper, my personal experience with the color yellow is when we’ve painted the walls in a room. It’s a tricky color, but when it comes to flowers I think Mother Nature has it figured out. Happy Easter to you too. Thanks for stopping by.

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      1. Yeah, it’s had to combine it with furniture, I imagine! How long did it take before you painted it another color – or did you stick with it? We wanted to paint our house green, but after one outside wall, it was like the house disappeared (because we lived in the forest and everything is green) so Hubs painted it back to the original color, light blue-grey!

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  35. Hi Ally, I used to listen to an assortment of favourite podcasts when I was driving/commuting every day. You remind me how I should start again, on my walks, or even part of my walks. This is the first time I have heard the words you use, Ally. “…ways to honour and center yourself.” I know I will ponder over these words and what they mean for me. Fascinating podcast. Bizarre, engaging, humorous…….it does put my mind in a different world than the present world I am now living in. A lot to be said for that. Thank you! Stay well. xx

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    1. Erica/Erika, I’m not a loyal follower of any podcast, but I do check in with a few of them every so often and this is one of them. I like Zaltzman’s voice so for me this particular episode was like Demerol. I like how you said: put my mind in a different world than the present world. That’s kind of everyone’s goal of late! Stay safe, be well. Thanks for stopping by to comment.

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  36. I’ve been doing pretty OK truth be told, thanks Ally. I did have a moment of rage this week (a bit of a rant will appear on my blog tomorrow) but this followed a couple of pieces of personal (non-virus) related sad news which probably made me more susceptible. My recovery has also moved into the second phase which my surgeon warned me would be difficult – how right was he! Putting a positive spin on it, at least I’m in lock-down and can’t get frustrated about my knee holding me back from getting out & about in the glorious spring weather we’re having here in England.

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    1. Deb, I like how you’ve decided to spin your approach to how you think about your recovery from surgery. You could sit there and fret, but why? In some ways you may have inadvertently picked the perfect time to have your surgery. No one is going anywhere, so you fit right in. Stay home? Sure, must do it, can do it. Win win.

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  37. As a coach, I know the importance of mindset and what we choose to focus on, so … I’d be a pretty poor advertisement for myself if I didn’t. And it genuinely does help. I’m not writing in a journal about the current time at the moment for I suspect it could lead me to focusing on the negative. Balance in all things needed, now as ever.

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  38. I am once again reminded that I need structure to my day. On days that weather permits and I can do some gardening in the morning and some sewing in the afternoon I seem to be in a better ‘mood.’ And, my husband is always grateful when I’m in a better mood. 🙂

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    1. Judy, my husband is working from home at our kitchen table during this so we have some structure superimposed on us because he has to go to work at 7:30 a.m. each morning, comes home at 4:30 p.m. each afternoon. But on the weekends we drift… into a timeless world… of doing whatever… Kind of trippy, really.

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  39. I’m doing well, mostly. But once in a while, such as when our County Executive announced that our shelter at home order is being extended “indefinitely” and he will “revisit the top in the middle of May” I get distinctly anxious. He may as well just say “you’re stuck at home forever, or at least until everyone is broke, homeless, dead or crazy, or any combination of the above.” I get what he means…why name a deadline if you can’t for sure honor it….but it would have been far better to say that he’s going to revisit the issue on a weekly basis. People need hope, always. It’s what gives us the strength to deal with difficult situations.

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    1. Ann, I agree with you: a weekly review would give me comfort, vague gibberish-y word not so much. Leaders lead with specifics, they don’t talk in double-talk. I can see why you’re anxious.

      Yes, hope is how we’re all going to cope with this worldwide situation. I feel like each day offers the possibility of hope, but only if I intentionally focus on finding it. It’s getting tiresome to do that.

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  40. We’re managing as well as we can, under the circumstances. Hubs is working from home. Kids have online learning until their last day of school, which was moved up to June 5th (three weeks earlier than originally scheduled). I was already working from home, so the only changes I needed to implement were HOUSE RULES concerning my need to be undisturbed during the work day. Hubs didn’t much like being told he can’t “check in on me” throughout the day, but he’s never understood how creativity works, lol.

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    1. Kate, three weeks early for the end of school! That’d be odd, but necessary. I like your idea of HOUSE RULES. I can see how it’d be necessary to have some clearly defined rules so that everyone plays nice with each other during the work day. We all adapt as we can. So happy to hear from you. Stay safe, be well.

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