Pretentious Much?

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HAVE YOU EVER HEARD yourself say something and think to yourself:

Did I really say that?  Honestly, who am I?

Zen-Den and I, with some friends, were at an art show in a park that is along a river.  We’ve been to this particular show many times together, and we each have our favorite artists who we want to checkout.  It makes for a predictable, leisurely afternoon.

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Z-D AND I WENT into one particular artist’s tent to see what he had going on.  For Z-D this guy is the highlight of the show, so he stopped to talk with the man.  I looked around but didn’t see anything that I wanted so I went outside to stand with our friends who were waiting.

When Z-D caught up with us he hadn’t bought a thing.  He turned to me and said: “what did you think of his stuff this year?”  And then I said the most out-of-character statement that I may have ever said.  I replied:

“Oh, his work is so derivative now that it’s passé.”

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THERE WAS A PAUSE while all of us looked at each other– and then we started laughing so hard that we had to stop looking at each other because of my absurd statement.

Accurate as it may be, I have no idea where that sentence came from.  I’m not exactly an art critic [or a critic of anything, for that matter].  All I can think is that I’ve read too many scholarly articles on Arts & Letters Daily.  Might be time for me to focus more on People magazine.

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I’M GOING TO FILE this charming little story, ridiculous as it is, under:

Do Not Take Yourself Too Seriously.  

Derivative? Passé?  Who says things like that?  Not me, usually. That’s for sure.  

Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Creative. Humorous. Adaptable. Happy enough. Looking for the crumb of truth in the cookie of life.

16 thoughts on “Pretentious Much?”

    1. Zen-Den, I don’t know that either one of us uses those words a lot, but I take your meaning. We both could make better use of the English language when we speak. 😉

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  1. I’m not quite sure I know what it means but I understand the situation. Occasionally I say something and then look around for my mother because surely she said it. I wouldn’t say a thing like that!

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    1. kate, all I was saying was that his art wasn’t unique anymore, so I wasn’t interested in buying anything. Why I didn’t just say that, I don’t know! But it did make for a good laugh.

      And I, too, occasionally say something that my mother would have said. Flips me out every time. Is it nature or nurture?

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  2. I like that statement and could easily say it about most of the movies or TV shows out there. It fits, although the language is rather highfaluting. Sometimes I enjoy using words to get my students’ attention, like masticate instead of chew and extrapolate(one of my favorite words).

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    1. Margaret, why thank you! It was a nice, truthful use of fancy words, but it’s so not how I speak that all we could do is laugh!

      I rarely use masticate, but extrapolate is useful in certain situations. I bet your high school students don’t know what has hit them when you start talking highfalutin’ like that. 😉

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  3. When we catch ourselves being pretentious, I think there’s hope that we’re still real. Sounds like you are. 😉

    So glad you stopped over to my blog after visiting Kate Crimmins’ blog … and thank you for commenting.

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    1. Hi Judy, I certainly sounded much more pretentious than I am. Still kind of baffled about where that sentence came from. Maybe it’s been lurking in my psyche since college just waiting to escape.

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    1. knottedfingers, welcome to my world! Glad that you found this blog and hope that you return often. It’s always fun to have a new gentle reader around here. Thanks for stopping by.

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    1. Andra, I bet that he does– and I’m sure that he’s right. It’s not that I was wrong, but I did sound more erudite than I meant to be. I mean, it was art… which I like just because I like it, not because I’m a critic.

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