Be The Light: Of Lost Sharks & Viable Solutions

INTRODUCTION:

You probably remember that I’ve joined We Are The World Blogfest, a yearlong monthly event.  

Again let me remind you that the purpose of this event is to highlight positive news stories, presenting these stories on your blog on the last Friday of the month.

This being the last Friday of October, I have an easily overlooked news story to share with you, my gentle readers & fellow #WATWB participants.

THE NEWS STORY:

On a beach in Australia a woman, Melissa Hatheier, 50, saw a stranded shark that seemed to be disoriented, swimming too close to the sandy beach, not out in the ocean.

She waded into the shallow water, dived on him, and grabbed the shark in such a was as to not hurt herself, while relocating him farther away from the beach.

That is, putting him back in the deeper part of the ocean where he belonged.

[Complete story with video: Australian Woman Picks Up Shark In Pool Rescue]

MY COMMENTARY:

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Do we not all love this woman?

[Did we not all immediately think of Mack the Knife when we read this article?]

Are we not inspired to be better people because of her?

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I’m going to say YES! to all three questions because this is a news story unlike any other that I’ve read lately.

I like that Hatheier saw a problem [shark in wrong place];  sized up the situation [I can capture this critter who is “kind of like a toddler”];  and then went on to solve the problem [put shark in better place].

Granted I’d be scared to try to hug a shark, but I say kudos to Melissa Hatheier for doing so.  And to any and all women out there who unceremoniously make their immediate world a safer place.

What could be more positive than that?

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Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Creative. Humorous. Adaptable. Happy enough. Looking for the crumb of truth in the cookie of life.

56 thoughts on “Be The Light: Of Lost Sharks & Viable Solutions”

  1. I think I would hesitate. I mean, it IS a shark. Even as small as that, it could be owie. I’d like to think I’d try, but it’s hard to say for certain, because sometimes I am brave and sometimes I am a fearful mess. I do think this inspired me. Only because she’s okay. SO if I do see a shark in peril, maybe, if it was small enough, I’d think of this woman and get brave.
    But the tune! *swoon* Ally Bean, I do love me some Mack the Knife 😀

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    1. joey, I’ve had the same thoughts as you about whether or not I’d try to catch a shark. I imagine that I wouldn’t, but feel that I can learn from this woman: she sized up a situation then trusted her own intuition about what to do. Too often I overthink things, doubting my own power for reasons varied. 🤔

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  2. I think, in those situations, you tend to act without over-thinking. I don’t know that I’d do that, but I know I’ve done things that, when I look back on them, I thought “oh wow, that was dumb.”

    This is a cool story. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Dan, you make a good point. We often just react. I know that hugging a shark would be too much for me to do, but I suppose I’d think of some other way to get that critter back to where it belonged.

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  3. Melissa is a hero for sure! I also don’t know whether I would be so bold … I haven’t listened yet to Bobby Darin’s Mack the Knife, but one of his songs I loved so much from a long time ago was 18 Yellow Roses … great post thanks Ally Bean!

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    1. Susan, I know that I wouldn’t initially think that I could jump in and capture a shark! 👀 But thank heavens that Melissa could. Her example made realize that we all do things to keep the world safe, in our own ways.

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    1. Allie P., I’m right there with you on the “Nopity Nope.” But I had to admire Melissa for getting the job done, with no fuss, no drama. There’s a positive lesson there, I’m sure of it.

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  4. Pretty sure I would not go in to save a shark but I might call someone who would. Love Mack the Knife. Fun fact, I worked for a cardiologist once who did heart surgery on Bobby Darin.

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    1. Margaret, you and me both if we tried this! But you gotta give it up for Melissa. I loved this woman the minute I read her low-key explanation of how she did what she did.

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    1. Janis, it’s the fast thinking that intrigued me the most. I couldn’t catch a shark, BUT if I could I’d like to think that I wouldn’t hesitate to help. I’ve had “Mack” in my head all day, too. 🐟

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    1. Carrie, I agree. I like how this woman took care of the problem without any fanfare. For that I give her props, but I’m too much of a chicken to even think about trying to do what she did. Still, it’s a positive story.

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    1. dgkaye, I wouldn’t try it either. But I love that Melissa did what solved the problem, like it was no big deal. Yes, Mack the Knife seemed so apropos for this story. Thanks for stopping by to comment.

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  5. I agree with Dan’s comment that sometimes we do things without thinking and then wonder “what the heck did I do?” later on. I give this woman credit for saving the shark when she could have merely left the water and called someone else to save it. She must be very kind-hearted when it comes to animals that need help. Thanks for this story, Ally, and for participating in #WATWB.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mary, I realize that I’d never do what this woman did, but I also realize that, like you said, in the moment she knew she could do it so without thinking she did it. I admire her ability, her kindness, and her gracious way of saying it was nothing. Thanks for stopping by to comment and for being a driving force behind this blogfest.

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    1. Betsy, I thought this woman was inspiring. I mean, if you saw a shark thrashing about would you even consider picking it up? Let alone take it to the deeper end of the ocean? I am forever in awe of her.

      [I don’t know about the woman who built the house, so it wasn’t me.]

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  6. I’d never pick up a shark no matter how “toddler-like”. That woman was BRAVE! Her story is very moving. Thank you for sharing this. And thank you for the inspiration to join WATWB myself!

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    1. Donna, you and me both. Grabbing a wiggly human toddler is one thing, but a toddler-sized shark is an entirely different thing. I love this woman for what she did and for her laid-back attitude about solving a problem. I’m glad that you joined in #WATWB. It’s fun.

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  7. I just drifted across web and landed on this page.

    The lady did something brave, and only a few rare gems would attempt it. Though, I would not be part of the later just because I may not identify the shark’s disorientation. However, what I would do is to go and rather get some help.

    So it may not be necessarily the best way for everyone to get in to the water and save the shark, but doing something about it while still trying to save the shark is worthwhile alike.

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    1. Hemal Shah Indianomics, “a few rare gems” is for sure. I agree that for most people this action would be foolhardy, but Melissa knew what she was doing. I like that she made the beach safe for people while at the same time allowing the lost shark to live. Seems like the ultimate win-win.

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    1. Guillie Castillo, I didn’t know that about the shark. I’m a landlubber, so they all seem equally sinister to me. However, like you said, it’s still “seriously gutsy.”

      Happy to meet you via #WATWB. It’s a fun blogfest that never disappoints. Thanks for stopping by to comment.

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  8. Sure I’d jump in and save that shark, and I’d also be a big fat liar! That takes guts and I’d be afraid they would be mine. Can’t help but admire her courage, though, I’d be thinking “Well I feel sorry for you Mack, but they’re more where you came from. So good luck.” Pretty incredible.

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    1. In My Cluttered Closet, I cannot dispute a thing that you wrote here. I loved this woman for her problem-solving ability, but am sure that I won’t be copying her specific way of handling the situation– or the shark, if you will. 😉

      [How have you been? Where have you been? Nice to see you here.]

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      1. Took a break for a variety of reasons. A new house, summer with the grandkids, and just needed to take a breather. It’s a pleasure to be back, though, as I’ve missed writing and reading everyone’s blogs. Thanks, Ally! :O)

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    1. Mary Aalgaard, I agree. I couldn’t do what this woman did, but I gotta give her props for making her immediate world a safer place. Happy to meet you via #WATWB. It’s a good one, isn’t it?

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  9. Absolutely love this story! As a wildlifeaholic, I commend anyone who does the RIGHT thing and actually save/help a predator rather than stating it is rabid/sick/dangerous and demanding it must be killed. She is a hero in my book, and we need more people like her. Thanks for sharing a heartwarming story!

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    1. Kate, I thought that Hatheier was remarkable, too. She had the experience necessary to know how to capture the shark AND the wisdom to know that it deserved a second chance out where it belonged. Plus I loved her way of downplaying the danger to herself… it was “kind of like a toddler.” Made me smile.

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