#ThursdayDoors | Visiting Heritage Village Museum To See Buildings From The 1800s

Today I’m joining Thursday Doors, hosted by Norm Frampton, so that I can share with you the following door photos.

I took these photos on Sunday at Heritage Village Museum in Sharon Woods Park, located in Sharonville, OH, a northern suburb of Cincinnati.

The village features 13 historic buildings, originally in other locations, preserved here to re-create what it was like to live in Ohio in the 1800s.   

Zen-Den and I wandered around the village on our own, opting for the self-guided tour of the outside of the buildings.  

Because of this, I don’t know much about the history of each building, but can say that we enjoyed the quiet village setting by a creek– and seeing how things used to be.

~ • ~

Church with clear glass arched window above small double doors.

~ • ~

Two-story yellow painted-brick home with dark green door.

~ • ~

Outhouse in the backyard.

~ • ~

Small home with fancy arches on its front porch.

~ • ~

Canal boat with long tree branch as its oar.

~ • ~

Creek with waterfall on a clear December morning.

~ • ~

Canal boat door.

~ • ~

Home with gingerbread trim on it.

~ • ~

Storm cellar door in the ground by the side of the house.

~ • ~

Small home with entrance door on the side + lace curtain at the window.

~ • ~

1891 schoolhouse with bell.

~ ~ • ~ ~

Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Creative. Humorous. Adaptable. Happy enough. Looking for the crumb of truth in the cookie of life.

59 thoughts on “#ThursdayDoors | Visiting Heritage Village Museum To See Buildings From The 1800s”

  1. Wow! Such beauty in the simple things! Looks like the day was so gorgeous! Perfect for a stroll through history. Your mom would have enjoyed this.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Beth, Z-D and I said the same thing about my mom! This was her kind of fun, and this particular museum was beautifully arranged. Plus, the weather was great.

      Like

  2. I realize from the brilliant blue skies that we’ve been under a blanket of grey for a very, very long time. Weeks. Golly, I miss the sun!

    That tiny house with the fancy arches – are those original? Quite novel, in either case.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Maggie, the weather here can be sunny and beautiful, but it’s not consistent. So on clear days I like to get outside into the light.

      I wondered about those arches, too. They look to me like they were made from modern materials, but I don’t know if that fanciness was an original feature on the house. Someday we’ll go back and take the guided tour.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. vanbytheriver, thanks! All these buildings were unique. I found myself more and more charmed by them as we walked along. I couldn’t help but wonder if the bell on the schoolhouse still worked.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Dan, thanks! I liked the church, too. Those doors are so narrow by today’s standards. I was fascinated by the canal boat. I assume that after settlers arrived at their destination, the wood from the boat would have been used to build something. I guess.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Deb, this stroll through history was entertaining in many subtle ways. The storm cellar door was one of those ways. We just wandered around a house and there it was– all old and mossy.

      Like

      1. I love when that works out. Glad you got to go! Sometimes I’ll make plans to go for pictures to a specific place and the weather is horrible 😣 But this looks seasonally just perfect!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. So very cool, Ally. What a great adventure to take. Love the schoolhouse and the gingerbread house. That little house looks like a perfect place for me to do my crafting! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet, I’ve tried to get to this museum many times, so to finally get there was a victory. The houses are all so quaint that I want to go back and take a tour to find out their history; I’ll listen attentively to find out what “your” house is all about. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

            1. Ok, I feel better about your early years. Your childhood home sounds like it was an amazing experience for you. And now, as an adult, you live in a newer house, perhaps?

              Like

    1. janet, you are most welcome! We were pleasantly surprised about how all these buildings were so well-maintained and accessible. It was, as you said, a beautiful place to wander around.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. There was a time in my life I would have considered a tour like this a big snore. Now I love them. Like you I find them peaceful, and I like to imagine life under those conditions. It’s humbling when I compare it to the conditions we live in now.
    … and those tiny houses? They housed families with 5+ children! Humbling indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Joanne, I like seeing how people used to live. It’s humbling to be sure. I cannot imagine how difficult it would’ve been to stay alive, isolated like these people were. However, I did like how quiet it was with no electric motors or cars making noise. The only sound other than people talking was the sound of the water flowing over the waterfall. Peaceful.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I remember my family went through a preserved historic community like this on a vacation when I was a kid…. somewhere in Illinois between here and Chicago. Of course, us kids were fascinated by the outhouse and probably took more pictures of it than anything else. I remember it said “PRIVY” on the door, and that’s one of those words that stuck with me from the moment I first saw it. I still humorously refer to the bathroom sometimes as the privy…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. evilsquirrel13, I like wandering through outdoor museums like this one. Easy to get the feel for how things used to be. Also, the details are fascinating… like your privy door. When I hear that word I think of the musical Oklahoma: “you can walk to the privy in the rain and never wet your feet!”

      Like

  6. Great photos! And great doors! The outhouse coming right after those opening two made me actually LOL! The gingerbread one is positively Hansel & Gretel, but my favourites are the little cottage and the school house.

    Like

    1. deb, the outhouse was just picture perfect– the color, the placement in the backyard by the fence. Rustic. I also like the schoolhouse, if only because it still has a bell on it that I’d love to hear ring. 😉

      Like

    1. The Cozy pages, you make an excellent point. I hadn’t thought of this museum village as writing inspiration, but it could be. If I ever get back there I’ll take a few notes about the buildings + my impressions of them. Thanks for stopping by to comment.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Janis, this was a pretty place for a stroll on a pretty day. I was impressed by the variety of doors that we saw in this village– because now I view all my adventures in terms of doors available to be photographed! What has Norm’s challenge turned me into? 🤔

      Liked by 1 person

    1. bedlamanddaisies, I thought the same thing about that gingerbread trim house. All it needed was a plump woman with her hair in a bun wearing a white apron while handing out cookies at the door! Thanks for stopping by to comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I love museums like this! There is a similar one near me, Strawbery Banke, which is a historical neighborhood that was actively inhabited from about 1695 (possibly earlier) to 1954. Today, visitors can walk through the various original buildings and talk to people (in costume) about life during colonial times all the way through WWII.

    I’m drawn to doors as well. I especially like the small double doors on the church. So quaint.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Kate, your historical village sounds fascinating. And to have been around for so long is unusual. Wow!

      I thought the white church doors were perfect– and in such contrast to the size of church doors today. Oh, how times have changed.

      Like

Comments are closed.