#ThursdayDoors | Visiting Fort Pulaski [Not Moultrie], An American Civil [Not Revolutionary] War Site

PLEASE NOTE: It’s been brought to my attention by my husband that these photos are from Fort Pulaski, south of Savannah, GA.  I had my forts wrong.  However, considering that Fort Pulaski is named for a Revolutionary War general my idea of posting these pics on George Washington’s birthday still makes sense.

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Today, in honor of George Washington’s birthday, I’m joining Thursday Doors, hosted by Norm Frampton, so that I can share with you the following door photos + a little bit of American Revolutionary War history.

I took these photos last April when we visited Fort Moultrie, on Sullivan’s Island, SC.  

The fort is named for a Revolutionary war general, who, on June 28, 1776, defended Charleston, SC, from the British.  Since then the fort has been rebuilt a few times and gone through a few more wars.  At the end of WWII the fort closed.  

The day we visited Fort Moultrie Pulaski the weather was sunny and mild, lending an unexpected peaceful vibe to the entire well-kept large complex.  

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Outer perimeter of Fort Moultrie Pulaski, surrounded by a moat, with visible cannon ball damage on the brick wall.

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DOOR leading into interior of fort.

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DOORS on one small part of the storage area that forms the perimeter of the inside of the fort.

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DOORS in a row leading to storage areas shown with people walking above the storage areas to give a sense of scale.

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DOOR into stairwell that goes up to the area where people were walking.

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DOOR into officers’ quarters.

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Photo of lighthouse in Charleston Harbor as seen from Fort Moultrie Pulaski.

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Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Humorous. Adaptable. Happy enough. Midwestern by chance. Kindhearted by choice. Usually.

49 thoughts on “#ThursdayDoors | Visiting Fort Pulaski [Not Moultrie], An American Civil [Not Revolutionary] War Site”

  1. How mom missed this one, I don’t know – interested in history, she dragged us to all sorts of colonial history sites. This fort is really cool – a moat and so big (thanks for showing the people to get the scale). Interesting variety of doors, too. Designed to suit their individual purpose.

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    1. philmouse, my mother [the history teacher] missed this one, too. Z-D and I went to see this fort thinking it’d be small, an hour to tour it. But turned out to take most of a morning to see and appreciate all that the fort had to offer. You’re right about the variety of the doors, added over time, each doing their thing perfectly.

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  2. Since I am full of odd facts, here is one you may not have known. We recognize George Washington’s birthday as being February 22, 1732… but he was actually born on February 11, 1731, which was the date on the Julian calendar at the time. When Britain finally adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752, everything got bumped up 11 days and the date of New Years was moved to January 1 rather than the original March 25.

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    1. evil, I knew that because growing up with a mother who was an American history nut, details like that were dinner table conversation. However, I didn’t think to add that fact, relevant as it is, to this post because I’m old now, with an addled brain. 😧

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  3. Nice to see something different re: the Revolutionary War. As you know, in Philadelphia, we are inundated with this stuff. I like that fort door to the interior. Very cool.

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    1. Tara, this fort was a part of the Revolutionary War, as well as the Civil War. Philly is nutty about the Revolutionary War, for good reason, but Sullivan’s Island history + Fort Moultrie were more about the passage of time– been here, done that, we’re cool.

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    1. JT Twissel, that’s a good point. I don’t know how many times Fort Moultrie has been rebuilt, but what’s there now gives the impression that it’s quite a sturdy place.

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      1. Ours are all forts to protect against the Indians. (who actually lived here but weren’t appreciative of us coming to take their land, their forests and their fish) Imagine that! On another note, your blog (probably Word Press itself) no longer notifies me of new comments on my email, even when I check the box.

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        1. We have some Indian forts in Ohio, too. They’re kind of tucked in here and there. Not too spectacular.

          Thanks for telling me about the comment email situation. I haven’t changed any settings on the blog, so I’m going to blame it on the WP platform in general. I’ll look into it, but…

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  4. As you noted, history lessons are usually wasted on the young and I think it’s because of the emphasis on the facts rather than the stories. It’s the stories we remember which is why the photo with the artillery damage is my favourite 🙂

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    1. Joanne, I agree with you. I grew up steeped in history, courtesy of my parents. I learned more from their stories and wandering around museums & forts than I did from making homework outlines of historical battles & legislative processes. 🙄

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  5. Now I’m wondering if I go way, way back to my Georgia days — did I get any good doors there? lol I love old forts, I do.
    I’m glad you shared these and your humble error. They’re both interesting 🙂

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    1. joey, I like to visit old forts [or houses]. I don’t, however, attempt to remember all the details of my visits as if there’s a test later. Hence, my mistake… corrected by Zen-Den.

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  6. I learned a lot from this post, and comments (including when George Washington’s ‘real’ birthday was). Great Thursday Doors post!

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    1. Donna, thanks. This post took an odd turn when I realized that I’d made a mistake about what I was talking about here. 😟 But the photos and the memory of how much we enjoyed the fort are true. And the GW facts are accurate, so… oh well, whatever. 😐

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    1. Elen, once I realized my mistake I decided I’d better correct it. It’s not the first time I’ve made a big goof on a blog post, so I’ve had experience re-writing a post. As for a trend, it might catch on– but would require a degree of honesty that could be difficult for some people to embrace. 🙄

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