#ThursdayDoors | Finding History In Front Of Us, Hello Texas Saltbox Houses

Today I’m joining Thursday Doors, hosted by Norm Frampton, so that I can share with you photos of the following doors.

Using my cell phone camera that is not so great, I took these photos last month when we were visiting San Antonio.

Come to find our hotel, Plaza San Antonio, had a past.  Situated on 6 acres located in a historic district originally settled by German immigrants in the 1800s, this hotel was built around old homes.

[Also, but not pertinent to doors, this hotel allegedly has a ghost running around in it.  I didn’t know that when we were there, but hat tip to Philosopher Mouse of the Hedge for letting me know what I missed.] 

On this hotel property, owned by Marriott, were well-kept old houses built in the New England saltbox style.  These various buildings, one of which I feature here, charmed the socks off me with their small scale and sturdy vibe.

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DOOR, very narrow, on side of Elmendorf-Tyler House.

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DOOR, seen up-close, showing hardware painted the same color as the door.

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Gate on property surrounding Elmendorf-Tyler House.

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DOORS, maybe still used as such, opening onto long porch on what I guess was the front of Elmendorf-Tyler House.

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Brick sidewalk between long porch and hotel rooms.

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DOOR, rarely used it would seem, leading into small shed attached to side of Elmendorf-Tyler House.

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Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Humorous. Adaptable. Happy enough. Midwestern by chance. Kindhearted by choice. Usually.

73 thoughts on “#ThursdayDoors | Finding History In Front Of Us, Hello Texas Saltbox Houses”

  1. Lovely doors. I really enjoyed walking around there when we were there in the spring. I was surprised at the variety of buildings. I have a bunch of photos of houses near the courthouse that seem to be mostly law offices these days.

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    1. Dan, San Antonio has a mixture of architecture that made it feel quaint, not big city. It seems like if an old house in an urban area isn’t turned into a funeral home, it becomes a law office! 😉

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    1. Betsy, I only mentioned the camera because as I stood there I realized with my real camera [that I was too lazy to drag along on this trip] I could have gotten better details and angles on the doors. And I like to do my best, you know? 😉

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    1. Donna, it certainly could. I can’t figure out if it was the front door at one time or a side door maybe used for haul things into the house? Either way, it’s weird by today’s standards.

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    1. Junieper, so true. That door was narrow, almost like a kitchen cabinet door, but not quite. I loved the gate, too. That pattern on it was pretty, but I don’t think it meant anything in particular. I just liked it.

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    1. Judy, I wonder about that narrow door, too. There were no details about the house itself other than the plaque explaining its the architectural style. I bet the ghost knows why the door is like it is!

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    1. Jan, this hotel was a surprise to us. We picked it for location, not history and mysteries. I hadn’t thought about the ghost NOT being friendly, but you make a good point. You never know with ghosts.

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  2. Skinny doorways always make me wonder ‘why?’. Is it that much more work to make a good-sized doorway? Easier to defend in an attack? Or is it just passive-aggressive behaviour towards big people? Maybe to keep out roving cattle?

    Enquiring minds need to know.

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    1. Joanne, I wondered about this door, too. I hadn’t thought about defending oneself against attack but considering the turmoil in Texas during the 1800s, it could be. I especially like your passive-aggressive reasoning! Your roving cattle idea might be the real answer. But will we ever know, for sure?

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    1. marian, I agree, it’d be fun to spend a night in one of the little houses… as long as the resident ghost didn’t have an issue with it. The gate is great. Something about it calls to me.

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  3. I’ve been to San Antonio a handful of times, always for work. The most recent time was over a decade ago, though, so maybe things have changed. I have never heard of, nor seen, the salt houses. Very cool.

    Traveling for work usually means you don’t see much, and that has been my experience with S.A. I have seen: The Alamo, the mall across the street from the Alamo (saw a movie there once for $1.00!), the River Walk, the Fiesta in spring, and I think that’s about it. The last time I was there I had some time to kill and walked from my hotel into a nearby neighborhood, and saw some lovely homes and beautiful architecture. But I have no idea what the neighborhood was. Big houses. One funny memory is that on one trip I had some time to kill alone, so I took one of the river tours, and I was admiring the beautiful magnolia trees, wishing we had them here. Got home and there are probably 15 of them between my house and the office. That I drove to. 5 days a week. I don’t like to think of myself as oblivious, but clearly I can be.

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    1. J, when you travel for work what you see in a city is limited, but it sounds like you saw a few interesting things in San Antonio. The only large houses we saw were out in the suburbs and they were behind gates. As is the way now, I guess.

      I didn’t notice the magnolia trees, although I’m sure they were there. Maybe not in bloom? I find it hilarious, and quite believable, that you only discovered your own CA magnolia trees after admiring them elsewhere. We all do stuff like that, having become acclimated to our own environments.

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  4. Whoever first dreamed up the idea of showing photographs of doors was pretty smart: I suspect the fascination will carry on forever. I can’t resist looking at these posts and noticing doors wherever I go. Thanks Allie!

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    1. L, Marie, well, thank you. I appreciate your support and interest in my flapdoodle and twaddle. I love that color, too– but have no explanation as to why that door is so narrow.

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