#ThursdayDoors | Visiting The Nature Center, Finding A Few Old Doors

Today I’m joining Thursday Doors, hosted by Norm Frampton, so that I can share with you photos of the following doors plus a little more.

On a sunny winter’s day we went to Rowe Woods which is part of the Cincinnati Nature Center.  Within Rowe Woods is Krippendorf Lodge.

Built in 1898-1900 and originally owned by Carl & Mary Krippendorf, this large home is on the National Register of Historic Places.  Krippendorf Lodge sits on 175-acres of wooded land that was once called Karlsruhe Gardens [meaning Carl’s Place of Peace], but is now called Lob’s Wood [I know not why].

Today Krippendorf Lodge is an event venue, available year-round for rent.  From the outside the building itself appears to be in perfect condition, as are the adjacent outbuildings that include a unique water tower.

I was unable to get a good pic of the front doors to Krippendorf Lodge, but I took a few other door photos while wandering around + a few artsy-fartsy photos for perspective.

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Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Humorous. Adaptable. Pleasantly crazy. Midwestern by chance. Kindhearted by choice. Wordy.

71 thoughts on “#ThursdayDoors | Visiting The Nature Center, Finding A Few Old Doors”

  1. Hi, Ally – I hadn’t realized that it was a water tower either. I seriously need to get with it!
    BTW (and totally off topic). Early yesterday morning, when I was walking home from yoga, I came across Cranky Pants and his dog Fred. I was resolved not to give any kind of greeting or to make eye contact, but Fred kept on making eyes at me (honest, he did). Then, out of the blue, CP smiled and said “what can I say, this dog really likes you”. I’ve passed this guy 100 times before without him even smiling. Perhaps he reads your blog?

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    1. Donna, the water tower is well-hidden inside a style of building that’s unusual. It’s easy to miss.

      I’m amazed that CP said something to you! This is progress and I’d humbly suggest that Fred is the reason CP broke down and was sociable. Fred is a good doggo and probably is desperate for some quality human friendship, considering who he lives with.

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  2. I want that water tower for my studio 🙂 I could make one floor my workshop, one floor the store and one floor to use as a crop room where people could come and work on their projects! The curved door is so cute!

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    1. Janet, that’d be great wouldn’t it? Well you could ditch your current plans and go big + tall with a copy of the water tower! I can’t even begin to imagine how much $$$ it’d cost to build that today… if you could even get the permit. 🤔

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      1. Pretty sure my husband would kill me if I told him I wanted something else at this point and you are right, my “little” 8 x 15 foot space has been pricey enough. Fortunately we only had to get a permit for the electricity which is a lot easier than a whole building permit.

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    1. Janis, I’d love to know what exactly is inside that water tower, too. We hope to make it back to there in the spring because I do love daffodils, of which there are supposedly hundreds to see all at once. 😊

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    1. Margaret, is that right? You’d know the meaning of the word of course! It does make sense in this context considering Carl was the child of a German immigrant and apparently Carl was all about nature and gardens. Thanks for that insight.

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    1. In My Cluttered Attic, I agree that the water tower is interesting. I’ve never seen a curved frame like that above a door and don’t know enough about architecture to explain it. The building is memorable and photographs well, so it’s here!

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    1. philmouse, I’d like to see the inside, but short of attending or hosting an event there I’m not sure how I could legally get inside. Yes, the daffodils call to me so *fingers crossed* we’ll get back there this spring.

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  3. Thanks for coming by Ally/ Looks like a nice lodge. with some nice doors! Love your capture of that lone watch tower (if that is what it is):) Often I hesitate to use that word because it reminds me so much on the Jehovah Witnesses.

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    1. Junieper2, you made me laugh with that one. The little building is a water tower, but in another location it could be a watch tower. [A real one, not a pamphlet one.]

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    1. L. Marie, thank you. The Nature Center is a tranquil place to visit, even when there are lots of people there. And the doors I find there are interesting to me, and to a few other people it would seem.

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  4. I read a little about Mr Krimpendorf from one of Elizabeth Lawrence’s books. He grew flowers and sold them commercially. She also wrote a book called Lob’s Wood, but I have not read that yet. I may write a post about it when I do. Great to see these photos!

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    1. CadyLuck Leedy, I’m not familiar with Elizabeth Lawrence’s books, but I should be. If Carl sold the flowers commercially the Nature Center omitted that piece of info. I’d especially be interested in knowing the details about the naming of Lob’s Wood. It’s an unusual name to be sure. Thanks for telling me this.

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      1. Mr C.K, his name is sooooo long, was quite the character. Very opinionated. He advertised his flowers and bulbs, most likely his daffs, in a Local Market Bulletin and corresponded with gardeners all over the country. That is how gardeners got their plants in the old days, through the Market Bulletins. Each section of the country had their own Bulletins and were put out by the Agricultural board. I will be writing a post about it. I have just about all of E. Lawrences books except that one on Lob’s Wood! I’ll look for it! Some of her books are out of print now and harder to find!

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        1. Thanks for telling me this. I’m tickled to know this about Mr. CK. The Lodge is a beautiful building and is situated in such a way as to take advantage of the natural beauty around it.

          I was unaware of Local Market Bulletins + Agricultural Boards yet now that you explain it, it makes perfect sense. Different times, different ways.

          Good luck finding the last book. I’ll keep my eyes open should I go into a used book store. Never know what you’ll find in one.

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      2. PS I just looked at another book by EL that I just received this week, called, The Little Bulbs, the Tale of Two Gardens……The Two Tales are about MR CK’s garden and EL’s garden! He planted tens of thousands of daffodils and other bulbs in his wood. EL wrote about him so much in her garden column in the Charlotte Observer that the folks would come to her garden lectures and ask about Mr CK!

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