Three Thoughts Thursday | Writing. Decorating. Answering.

This is when I tell you stuff and don’t make a story of it.  

• • •

ONE

I think that this website, Alliteration Applications, could be a useful tool for writers.

It’s easy to use and if you happen to need to create an alliterative phrase, for some reason, this website makes quick work of it by helping you find words that might work for you.

I’ve never needed anything like this website, but I do like goofing around with words, so I think it’s fun.

TWO

I think that the idea of granny chic, as a trend in interior design, is an unexpected throwback.

According to this recent House Beautiful article, The Rise of ‘Grandmillennial’ Style, there’s a trend toward embracing what might be referred to as old-fashioned traditional style.  As such, chintz, floral wall paper, needlepoint pillows, and bright colors are in fashion again.  There is a quiz that you make take to see if you are part of this trend;  click on the title of the article, scroll down, find the quiz.

I would not enjoy living in a space with this particular decorating trend, but I don’t begrudge anyone who wants to embrace it.  You go girl granny.

THREE

I think that the number of Deborahs who comment here is noteworthy.

Yes, referring back to the poll question found on THIS blog post, Deborah, either full or shortened to Deb, is the first name spelled the same way that I see most often in my comments.  There are five of you: Circadianreflections Blog  | Debs Despatches  |  I am, therefore I write  |   Temenos of the Blessing Light  |  The Badass Widow

The name Kate was the winner of the poll, btw.  But it wasn’t the right answer.  Sorry, kids.

• • •

Questions of the Day

Are you fond of alliteration? Do you even have an opinion about it?

What do you think about granny chic decorating? Is it a trend whose time has come OR is too cluttered & twee for you?

Do you follow any of the Deborahs mentioned above? If not, why don’t you change that right now?

• • •

Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Humorous. Adaptable. Charmingly cynical. Midwestern by chance. Kindhearted by choice. Fond of words.

119 thoughts on “Three Thoughts Thursday | Writing. Decorating. Answering.”

    1. Jill, that was my immediate response when stumbling over the article. Then I read it and thought to myself, as my late great aunt would have said: ye gods! She hated chintz with a passion.

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  1. Yes! I’m a winner. Is my prize in the mail Ally Bean?
    Getting ready for work, so no time to read the link now, but does granny chic blend into it’s scheme any antimacassars? In my mind, those are about as granny as one can get 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. uh oh….I can’t open the link, says you’re not there!

    On Thu, Mar 12, 2020 at 7:05 AM THE SPECTACLED BEAN wrote:

    > Ally Bean posted: ” This is when I tell you stuff and don’t make a story > of it. • • • ONE I think that this website, Alliteration Applications, > could be a useful tool for writers. It’s easy to use and if you happen to > need to create an alliterative phrase, for some” >

    Liked by 2 people

    1. dawn, I’m here and so is your comment. I don’t know what’s up with WP this morning, but I had trouble posting this. Like we all need more difficulties in our lives, hoping this isn’t a new trend with WP. 🤨

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      1. Doesn’t show via the link, but if you cut off the stuff at the end of the URL and go to thespectacledbean.com it shows up. Maybe WP has the virus (ha-choo!).

        Liked by 2 people

    1. LA, I’m all about interior design, but this particular trend leaves me cold. HOWEVER, if that pleases someone then by all means do that inside your home. I’ll applaud you for knowing your mind.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I think it’s amazing that such an alliteration aid exists! I don’t have much use for alliterations (and even less use for needle-point pillows and whatnot!), but at least I know where to go if I need some alliterative assistance 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I ANSWERED DEBORAH!! What do I win?
    Thanks for the grammar nerd website link, by the way. I am getting better and better at grammar each year thanks to hanging out with writers like yourself.
    Also, I took the granmillenial quiz and why are 70 percent of the population using cloth napkins every day? Do they not do the laundry??

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Writer McWriterson, you are a wise woman to have picked Deborah on the poll. You win my admiration, how’s that?

      I wonder about the whole Granny Chic trend. I don’t get it. I/we tend toward a more relaxed traditional look with clean lines and family antiques. Chintz and fussy stuff? Not for us.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I doubt that this “trend” is actually “trending” in the real world. Instead, I suspect that certain designers want to encourage its comeback . . . so they are reaching into social media to get people on board.

    In short, I expect that it’s a bit like the Emperor’s New Clothes. 😆

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Nancy, I like your take on this trend and agree. I’m all for everyone decorating their home as they see fit, so if this makes a few people happy, great. As for making many people happy, I dunno. Sounds like a way to spend a lot of money quickly to me. 😑

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I like “granny chic” to a degree. Why? I’m a granny who aspires to be chic. The HGTV gal who approaches that style is probably Erin Napier on Hometown; she even designs her own wallpaper. Not totally my style thugh.

    Yes, I adore alliteration, Ally. Sometimes I consider it when creating blog post titles. Yesterday my husband came up with a semi-alliterative title for my grandfather clock blog post this week: A Ticking Time Balm. Brilliant? Yes, I thought so too. Ha!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Marian, I don’t watch HGTV but now that you mention it I wouldn’t be surprised if this article somehow ties into the show. While I don’t want the look in our house, if’n that’s your thing then please go for it.

      Like you, I do like me some awesomely articulated alliteration. The website is interesting and easy to mess around on. You may have a secret weapon there with your husband and his ability to create blog post titles. 🤓

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I use alliteration every now and again for post titles, but that’s about it. It’s useful because it’s catchy.

    Now that granny stuff–not my thing at all. It’s too Precious for me. And cluttery. And deliberate-looking. I’m not that…Sweet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. nance, I use alliteration in the same way that you do. I liked the website because I’m a wordy girl, you know?

      Yes, I’m with you about how granny chic is too precious and contrived for my taste. I like a more streamlined look, a relaxed traditional look, that suggests I know what century I’m living in.

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  8. 1) I just tried out the website you linked…put the word ‘booger’ into the synonym generator—have no idea why that word popped up in my mind. Then I bookmarked the site thinking it will fun on sleepless nights.

    2) I’m not surprised that “gannymillennial style” is becoming popular. Everything that was old is new again has been guiding decor and fashion forever. I’ve been there done that and am not attracted to the ‘granny’ trend.

    3) I follow Deb from the Badass Widow blog. I think I found yours through hers.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Jean, I agree that the alliteration website is fun. I goofed off on it for a long time for no reason other than I could.

      I was surprised by granny chic style. I’d have thought the idea was from SNL skit if I hadn’t read the article on a reliable website. That being said, it’s not for me either.

      I love how we all find each other through the comment sections on blogs. Without the interaction that goes on in those sections we’d not know each other– and that’d be sad.

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  9. Maybe I’m in the minority but I love florals. I always find a way to sneak them in somehow. Maybe not on a sofa but small bits here and there. I may like granny chick light. Oddly though, I’m not a fan of antiques. Those damn things are never comfortable!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Kate, I like flowers but floral prints aren’t for me anymore. I understand how to use them in design and have done so in some of our homes. I like antiques for anything like a desk or a bookcase or a chest of drawers, but not for sitting on. I’m with you on that point.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Eilene, the alliteration website got me giggling because I’m nutty like that. You raise a good question. I’ve no idea what % of people re-decorate their homes to stay in style. I bet more than I think would– especially with Instagram nudging them on.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Another fun one, Ally!. I try to use alliteration in my post titles (March Madness this month) and I try not to repeat from year to year so your tool may be very helpful. I feel a bit cheated on the poll because I think you said the name was spelled the same way so I didn’t consider Deb the same as Deborah, but I do follow most of those lovely ladies. Deborah from Temenos is the one who got me started on the A to Z because of her love of abecedariums. I must confess that when they asked in the poll what scallops were, my first thought really was the edging but I don’t like the granny style so I picked fish as my answer. I think you can kind of manipulate these quizzes to get the outcome you want sometimes. I think you should change it to Kool Kid. Hope you have a thrilling Thursday 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet, I didn’t mean to mislead anyone with the poll, but maybe I did. Mea culpa. Had I not known the answer I would have guessed Kate, so I’m not surprised it won the poll.

      I like how you cheated on the quiz questions. You’re right, it’s not too difficult to skew the result toward what you want your answer to be. I don’t know if alliteration has to be the same sound, exact same letter OR if it can be the same sound, different letters. 🤔

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Janis, I had a difficult time getting this post to publish this morning. I don’t know what happened, but eventually I got it to work. Fingers crossed this isn’t a trend with WP. Thanks for making the effort to find this post. You are an absolutely awesome!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Any fun games with words is cool. Who knew there would be a site all about alliteration. Guess there’s a site for everything. I’m always amazed
    Maybe the “granny” decor is just another revival driven by the times..- a sort of escape to something bright and comforting?
    It was really big in the 80’s I think (Times were hard then too in many places. Laura Ashley or something ?). And then there was a floral print trend back when Cher was first singing “Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves” ? (The peasant look – even Ralph Laurent?)
    It’s just one big cycle…for those who missed it the first time…for those who need to sell stuff? (Grandmother once said “don’t ever throw good quality stuff away because it’s out of style; just wait a few years and it will be all new again”)
    I’m not a indoor floral print person – even antiques. – I like it, but not for me. I really like flowers outside though.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. philmouse, the alliteration website made me smile. Like you I was amazed, but intrigued.

      You’re right about design trends resurfacing again and again. Years ago I remember a friend who was crazy about Laura Ashley and went all in for it. I don’t hate this trend revival per se, it’s just that I’m not a floral print [or flame stitch or check] person. I’d feel stifled if my home was granny chic, but if it makes you smile then go for it.

      I like flowers outside, too. There I find them lovely and inspiring. Their colors call to me unlike those same colors inside the house.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Woohoo! I’m a winner. Sorta.
    I welcome the return of bright colours to fashionable homes. I am tired of seeing 50 shades of grey interiors. Would it kill people to punch it up a bit with a few colourful throw cushions? I ask ya. 🙂

    Deb (full name Deborah)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Deb, you’re a winner. I consider Deborah and Deb to be the same name because they are, just different versions of it.

      I know what you mean about all the gray tones, some are drab, some resonate. I like warm grays but I’m also a person who’s known for adding splashes of spirited color to a room so for me gray is the backdrop.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. susie, granny chic is close to Victorian style in its fussiness. I only learned about this trend recently but don’t think I’ll be jumping onboard. The alliteration website is a goof, but a good one.

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    1. Anne, Deborah or Deb is the answer so you did good. I consider those names to be the same, one being the diminutive of the other.

      I enjoy following interior design trends, but like you I don’t judge how other people decorate their homes. I know what you mean about some of those deep low chairs. Why? 😐

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  13. When is classical prehistoric going to come back into fashion? Rock walls with hand painted art, sabertooth tiger rugs, stone loveseats. I mean, if you’re going to embrace past trends, why not really live in the past?

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Deborah makes a lot of sense. It was an extremely popular name in my age group and many of us are bloggers or read blogs. I don’t care for fussy or chintz. I don’t think I would like wallpaper much either. I prefer modern, clean lines, but with accent colors.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Margaret, I wonder when Deborah peaked in popularity? I bet there’s some connection that stat and why so many read this blog. Women of a certain age, you know!

      Granny chic is too twee for me. I’ll never put wallpaper in a house after some of the experiences we had along the way removing wallpaper that other people put up. It was called sweat equity, but really it was just a kind of hell. 😬

      Liked by 1 person

  15. My house is very eclectic – a smattering of the chinzy and the modern. I did note that wall papering is coming back into style. Not for me. I’ve had to strip wall paper off of too many walls! Horrible job!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jan, you and me both. We bought houses along the way that came with hideous wallpaper and we stripped it off. Never would I even consider wallpaper again, even if I liked it.

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  16. I use alliteration sometimes, assonance also Ally. I love to play with words too, including using onomatopoeia, just for kicks. My boss is a wordsmith and collects odd words then uses them. I think he was using “kerfuffle” before it enjoyed its current popularity. I had never heard the word “gobsmack” until highlights of the Oscars the morning after as to how Brad Pitt described his surprise of winning. Then Kate Crimmons used that word (where have I been – I had to Google it after BP used it?)

    As to granny chic, now I have some afghans that my mom knit and are in the TV room. I don’t watch TV in there (have not seen TV in over a decade) but it makes the room look cozy. No more granny chic though at this house – Early American/country and I have a lot of ducks, roosters, and geese hanging around here. As long as we don’t go to “Little House on the Prairie” chic, we’re good. My room is is so cluttered and stuff is stored under the bed so no room for the chamber pot. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Linda, I like words, too. Using a variety of them is fun and makes for more meaningful &/or silly conversations. And who doesn’t want that?

      You make a good distinction between granny chic and Early American style. They are different but like all decorating trends they have certain things that overlap. I’m with you about Little House on the Prairie style. Too harsh and uncomfortable for me, but if that’s something someone likes, wanting to live like a pioneer, then have at it. I’ll try to not think of you as a weirdo. 🙄

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Have you ever looked at the website Bas Bleu? I won’t send the link as you’ll need to fish this comment out of SPAM, but my boss used to order from their hard copy catalog all the time. That catalog featured all kinds of flash cards of unique words and phrases and he’d memorize them all, then buy more. It was a fun catalog to look through. I’m going to skip the LHOTP decor for now, though I’ve already lived through the early 70s when we thought we were all that and more in our maxi dresses – what were we thinking?

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        1. I don’t know that website, but it sounds interesting. I remember maxi dresses, but the whole concept of them makes me fretful. How could anyone walk with all that fabric hanging around one’s ankles?

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          1. The site is fun Ally. I had not looked at it in awhile. Long dresses were dangerous – but palazzo pants were also in style around that time, as were the “elephant bell” bluejeans – equally as dangerous. Palazzo pants during the day made no sense to me, but I saw many kids tripping over their clothes on the stairway trying to get to their next class timely. I was not allowed to wear those clothes, except the maxi dress I bought with my allowance – my parents were strict about my clothes. I wore it one time I believe, but not to school. I know I have no pictures of me wearing it.

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              1. Ha ha – my parents said “we clothe you and how you look to the outside world is a reflection of us.” My parents were older and very set in their ways. I had to fight hard to use my own allowance for that stupid dress.
                I had a wooden purse that looked like a treasure chest and Grecian-looking, lace-up sandals that I bought with my allowance to go with it. Great get-up, huh? I can still see my mom, as we got ready to go visit friends of the family – she was eyeing my outfit and saying “I’m telling Werner and Alfonsa that you bought that outfit yourself – if you put on that outfit to go out in public with us, we’d leave you behind!” That was about my era as a teenager. Now I’m going to put on my sweats and bundle up … a far cry from my “fashion years” … enjoy your day Ally and perhaps you’ll continue on that 80-mile trail.

                Liked by 1 person

  17. I’m split in half on the quiz. Cloth napkins, quilts, embroidered pillowcases — these things feel timeless and homey to me and that is comforting. I do have a lot of handmade craft in my home, very personal. BUT I like clean clear surfaces too much to enjoy the twee in my own space. No fuss for me, I say.
    I do like alliteration, I do.
    I follow one Deborah religiously and another I read from time to time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joey, I can understand how the quiz might not have encapsulated your exact decorating vibe. I imagine like all things design-y it’s a matter of the proportion of the items in question. Go more one way, it’s granny chic. Go more the other way, it’s modern eclectic. And who knows what’s in the middle? Maybe you! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I’m a granny chic – chintz, wicker, still have some tiny floral wallpaper in two rooms, blue and white dishes, but unfortunately I do not do needlepoint. I like the color and the coziness of it all but sometimes people think my home looks like a B&B. A work colleague stayed over one night during a snow storm and I laid out her breakfast stuff, blue and white china on on a blue tray, for the morning (she had the morning shift and I had the evening so I didn’t get up early). That Christmas she gave me a set of white damask napkins embroidered with my initials – she must have thought I was a cloth napkin of person, but then my guest bedroom is blue and white – straight out of Victoria magazine.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Joni, you sound like you know exactly what you like in your home and you make it so. I admire anyone who decorates in a way that appeals to them, even if it’s not my thing. It’s the act of making a space your own that is what makes the space perfect, not the design trend itself. I like blue and white china and we have some outdoor furniture that is wicker [or maybe it’s rattan?] so I’m not entirely against granny chic in our home.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Like many people who haven’t moved in 30 years I just have a lot of nice stuff I have accumulated over the years that has meaning to me and I still like. And yes I know when I go to sell that wallpaper will be gone, but I have an older home with a lot of wood trim, but someone buying it would probably gut the inside and put in all white baseboards and doors, of which there are 13 which is why I don’t do it! Wallpaper does come off easier on these old plaster walls though as I found when I removed the kitchen border.

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        1. We’ve been here 20 years and of late I’ve become more focused on clearing out the accumulation we have. I can only imagine how much stuff you have! I understand how it happens. I imagine you’re right about who’ll buy the property and what they’ll do with it. Wood trim isn’t popular like it once was, which I have mixed feelings about; I like both wood and white trim. I didn’t know that about tearing wallpaper off plaster walls. Interesting.

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          1. I’ve done two major clearing outs lately, once in 2017 after reading the Marie Kondo book, and this past Jan/Feb, mostly the basement and kitchen stuff, but there’s more that could go, esp. dishes – it’s a never-ending thing, but I am consciously trying not to buy anything more. Sometimes I think I’d like to have a booth at a flea-market! The painter just ripped that paper off the plaster easy peasy- actually my neighbour was over visiting with her 7 year old granddaughter and he let her rip it off – what fun she had doing that! Well the parts she could reach.

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            1. That’s sweet that the painter had the little girl help him remove the paper. We have the never-ending stuff + things problem going on here, too. I’ve inherited furniture and things, and we’ve changed our style over the years, so our basement is a flea market in its own right. What to do, what to do, eh?

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  19. Yahay – a winner! I nearly voted for Kate in the poll, but decided if I didn’t vote for me, how could I expect anyone else to 🙂 Thanks for the alliteration website – with my blog name it won’t be any surprise that I’ve a bit of a soft spot for it … and now I could get lost for ages playing. I browsed the choices in grannymillenial quiz, confident that it’s not my taste at all. In the years when I browsed antique markets, it was always the art deco/nouveau stuff that caught my eye, while the Victorian stuff which my (ex)SIL adored, was way too fussy. I was amused to read a couple of items (cloth napkins and blue & white china) were indicators, as my daughter has both 🙂 But against a backdrop of clean and minimal modernism, I think they look quirky rather than fussy – not that I won’t take the opportunity to tease her 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Deb, yes you are a winner. 🏆 Good that you went with your name and for a smart reason at that.

      We used to go to antique markets, but haven’t done that in years. I’m not much for the fussy Victorian look that to me is the essence of granny chic. We have blue and white china, an eclectic mix of it in fact, but I think of that more as relaxed traditional than granny chic. Of course, as with all design trends, take what appeals to you and forget the rest. Whatever works, works. And when it doesn’t work anymore, let it go. It’s just stuff.

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    1. Pam, as I am neither a granny nor chic I take your point. Funny to me how I ended up with so many Debs/Deborahs. If there’s a message in that I don’t know what it is, but I like them all so *yay*

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  20. At the risk of being the 700th reader to tell you, your link doesn’t work. When this happened yo me, it was just a typo in the Read more space.

    Janet

    On Thu, Mar 12, 2020 at 7:05 AM THE SPECTACLED BEAN wrote:

    > Ally Bean posted: ” This is when I tell you stuff and don’t make a story > of it. • • • ONE I think that this website, Alliteration Applications, > could be a useful tool for writers. It’s easy to use and if you happen to > need to create an alliterative phrase, for some” >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet, thanks for letting me know this. I don’t know why but I had trouble yesterday when I posted this post. Some people got the link while others did not. From my end of things it looked like all was well, but again I have no idea why. My husband suggested it’s because WordPress has the virus. Seems like as good of explanation as any.

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      1. Bizarro. I thought my comment would go directly to your email inbox. I just replied to the notification. But here it is. And, I wouldn’t have even known had Susan Scott not liked it, which for some reason I was also notified of. (Thank you, Susan) But I was not notified of your reply. If your hubs is right, this truly is a most unusual virus. Now, I shall go read the post that started it all. Ta ta.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Janet, thanks again for letting me know about this. I’ve done nothing different on my end of things that should cause the WP system to go bonkers, yet it has. Now that you mention it I’m not getting notices from some other bloggers after they reply to a comment I left on their blogs; when I return to their blogs later I see that they have replied. Somehow it seems fitting that this would happen at the end of last week. So. tired. of. problems. not. of. my. own. making. 😧

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  21. I follow two of the Debs (Deb’s Dispatch and Widow Badass), so that was a pleasant surprise. My dad was the alliteration king in our home while growing up, and I’ve never been able to replicate his cleverness. But the website you offer is a nice aid. I like to look at grammar and language sites for tips, but then forget about them completely when it’s time to write. Duh. – Marty

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  22. Marty, I cannot explain why Debs/Deborahs are here, but they are. And I appreciate them, of course. The alliteration website was a bit of silliness, but it struck me as it could be useful to some of my readers so I put it out there. I had a fun time goofing on it.

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  23. I remember learning about alliteration in grade school. It was one of more entertaining composition lessons.

    I’ve used it frequently in my writing, but it feels cheap. I suppose because somewhere in my writing education I was told to avoid it. But it crops up more often that I care for.

    Like this sentence in my most recent post – “Baby boy Beebe” (and Beebe is pronounce Bee-bee, so an extra hit.) It sticks out like a sore thumb to me.

    [shrugs] whaddya gonna do, eh?

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    1. Maggie, I know what you mean about alliteration. It is a bit of a ploy for attention.

      Your latest post appeared to me as existing, but when I clicked on the link it wasn’t there. I had the same thing happen with this post, so something is up with WP.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. Grandma chic – ugh! It brings the smell of mothballs to my nose. No needlepoint pillows needed in my new home.
    Thanks for the link to the website though – I love the sounds of alliteration! I tried the random sentence creator and got this:
    “Anxious Amanda aimlessly answers amount.” [My mind instantly drifted to the toilet paper supplies panic] Lol.

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    1. Amanda, it’s funny how the term ‘granny chic’ elicits definite responses. Everyone immediately knows if it’s something they’d like, even without seeing pics of it. I was the same way as you, saying “no way” immediately. But to those people who adore it, what a fun thing!

      Your alliterative sentence is adorably accurate and authentic. It’s a fun website to know about.

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  25. Hmmm…now I wish I could remember which name I voted for. And I am thinking about writing a post about Deborah in the Bible. Apparently, she was quite the bada$$!

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    1. Laurie, I was pleasantly surprised by the number of Deborahs who comment here and who I follow. It’s a lovely name. I remember Deborah in the Bible, but not much of her story now that I think about it. 🤔

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  26. I wanted to answer ‘Neither’ to most of those quiz questions so I guess that makes me a typical cynical Gen Xer.
    Old fashioned styles usually only attract those who haven’t lived them before. I think if you’re of an age when you remember a certain style you’re more likely to shudder at its return. I saw three mullet hairstyles last week. WHYYYYYY?????

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    1. MOSY, I know what you mean about the answers to the questions. Perhaps the quiz wasn’t as well written as it could have been? 😉 I’m not into the granny chic vibe, either. I agree about how old-fashioned styles are for those who haven’t experienced them before, but that still doesn’t excuse anyone from having a mullet hairstyle.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Sheryl, I’d no idea about this decorating trend until I stumbled on the article last week. Apparently it’s been going on for a few years as a kind of backlash to the return of mid-century modern that has been the look lately.

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  27. I’m glad I’m not the only one who could not link to this post Ally Bean! I’ve been giggling a bit at some of the responses, so thanks for the laugh to all.

    Is Granny Chic merely florals and chintz? Granny Chic can apply to all Grannies who have their own particular chic. Bold beautiful, soft and beautiful whatever kind of chic. Although I’m not a Granny (I would like to be but my sons have not produced) I do have the odd floral cushion thrown in among the other different ones. Comfort would be my first consideration but definitely the other would be how I then design it the way I want to …

    A deluge of Deborah’s and all their derivatives … I agree it is a lovely name – and she is an important woman in biblical times. I will refresh my memory (note to self).

    I am nervous to check out that alliteration link …

    Thanks for a great post. Keep safe and well …

    Like

    1. Susan, it’s been fascinating to see who was able to get to this post and who wasn’t. I didn’t do anything different when posting it, but it sure went its own way instead of the tried and true path. Thanks for finding me here despite the publishing mess.

      My take on Granny Chic is that it’s fussy and floral and bright colors. It’s a response to the more clean lines and subdued textural fabrics that have been all the rage here in the USA. I like the cleaner lines and am all about texture, so this style isn’t for me. But for those who love it, go for it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes as you said re fussy and overly floral and a bit cutesy etc – maybe an attempt to regain lost times or something? I too like clean unfussy with a touch of colour here and there whether cushions artifacts throws etc –

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I’ve the exact same approach to decorating. I imagine you’ve nailed this trend with your suggestion that this is an attempt to regain lost times. And if that makes you feel good about yourself, huzzah!

          Liked by 1 person

  28. I had a peek as you can see
    and must of sorts let it it be
    For to be or not to be
    diverse and of verse
    as doth the rime
    speak to me
    – (I can’t make up any more)

    SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE’S “THE RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER”
    “The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew,
    The furrow followed free;
    We were the first that ever burst
    Into that silent sea.”

    Liked by 1 person

  29. What a refreshing personality you are, Ally. I like using the Thesaurus when I write to give me a wider selection of choices instead of using the same word twice or thrice. Decorations …. I’m original. I don’t follow trends and as an artist I choose what is pleasant to my eye or what I am in the mood for.
    Don’t loose your sparkles. This world needs more sparkle.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. AmyRose, thanks for stopping by the blog. I’m with you about the Thesaurus. I don’t use it to sound pompous, only to relieve the tedium of using the same word over and over.

      I call myself an active amateur when it comes to interior design. I/we have our own style and are comfortable with it, but I do enjoy reading about and seeing photos of other people’s homes. This granny chic trend caught me by surprise.

      You sparkle on, too. There can’t be too much of it right about now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You are welcome, Ally. My use of the T. is the same as yours …. variety purposes.
        I’ll have to check out the granny theme. It intrigues me.
        True regarding sparkle. Insanity seems to be the rule of thumb. No insanity here, thank you! (smile)

        Liked by 1 person

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