More Than Ever, Cleanliness & Curiosity Are The Keys To Healthy Living

Childhood saying as timely as today’s news

I’m checking in here to see how everyone is doing.  

I don’t have anything in particular that I need to tell you, my gentle readers.

Sure, I could go on about my understanding of the novel coronavirus and how much of this mayhem could have been avoided if sensible preventive measures had been taken earlier, but to what end?  It has been discussed ad nauseam, so why be redundant?

Nope, all I have to add to the blogosphere today is two pithy little images that summarize my current approach to living healthy in these difficult times.  

Historical perspective as timely as today’s news

The first image, that I created all by myself, is something that floated into my mind over the weekend;  I’ve no specific source for the saying.  My guess is that when I was a wee little bean I learned it in Presbyterian Sunday School wherein the emphasis on cleanliness was up there on a par with all things Biblical.

The second image is one that I found recently in one of the more enlightened corners of social media.  I’d suggest that Newton’s example puts a bit of perspective on the realities of our daily lives now.  Given all this free time it’s the perfect opportunity to follow your curiosity about something that you’ve always been meaning to learn about.

And with that I shall hit publish on this post, wishing y’all germ-free days and thought-filled nights. Stay safe.

Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Humorous. Adaptable. Charmingly cynical. Midwestern by chance. Kindhearted by choice. Fond of words.

145 thoughts on “More Than Ever, Cleanliness & Curiosity Are The Keys To Healthy Living”

  1. Absolutely agree that any “home time” can be most productive if folks allow themselves to RELAX so they can think, plan and just be. Thankfully, I have the Mighty One – A. Bean – to help me with that, for which I am eternally grateful.

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    1. Zen-Den, you said it with RELAX. Not in the sense of not caring about cleanliness and kindness, but in the sense of learning to chill out at home instead of being addicted to busyness. ‘Tis a great time to be an introvert. 😊

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  2. And Shakespeare wrote… was it King Lear? I forget which one (‘‘twas a long time ago now). But you get the idea. Must get cracking. Thanks for a lighter look at a most serious topic. Mine too, tomorrow.

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    1. Janet, I don’t mean to dismiss the gravity of this pandemic, but I do think that perspective helps everyone stay rational. Hence a post that suggests a simple way, or two, to deal with this reality. Looking forward to what you have to say tomorrow.

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  3. I can’t help but wonder if all of our devices contribute to the spread of germs. Often people will hand me their phone to look at something. Of course, I immediately wash my hands after touching it. But do they ever wipe down their phone after passing it to others? Personally, I don’t want anyone to touch my phone or my computer at the office.

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    1. Jill, I wonder the same thing phones and computers. I don’t know how long this virus stays on plastic and glass, but I’ve taken to giving the evil eye to the outside of bottles of water or soda. Could they be contributing to the spread? Am I to wash them, too?

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    1. Rivergirl, for some people I’m sure it’ll be a staycation. I hope they enjoy it. Z-D is still working in an office building downtown so we wait and see what’ll happen next. Ain’t life a pip?

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        1. I wonder how he’ll like working from home? I think for those people who get the opportunity to do that, it’ll be wonderful. I worry about the people whose livelihoods depend on being around people. People like servers and bartenders and hair stylists and nail techs. How will they survive financially?

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          1. My husband works from home a day here and there anyway so it’s no big deal for us. Aside from the fact he’ll drive me crazy…
            But yes, the vast majority of workers are going to be hit hard.

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  4. If ever there was a weird time, this is it. As introverts, we clearly have the advantage right now in terms of having coping skills firmly engrained.

    The only real danger I see in my world right now is that I’m married to an extrovert. If I don’t kill him before this is all over, I will have deserved sainthood.
    … wow, that felt so good to say! My sense of humour has just been restored for another day 😃

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    1. Joanne, you said it: weird times. I can only imagine how much patience it’s going to take for you to live a subdued lifestyle with an extrovert. As a fellow introvert, I hear ‘ya and feel your pain. Hang in there, sistah!

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      1. The only thing that would make this social distancing thing more palatable is if they isolate all the extroverts together. The collective sigh of relief from both introverts and extroverts would be astounding 😉

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    1. Dan, this pandemic may ultimately come down to being the revenge of the introverts. I feel sorry for the extroverts who like to be on the go, but for us, like you two, we’ll find things to do at home. No problem.

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  5. I was just thinking along the same lines that life that has been so fast and furious, has basically come to a standstill in many ways. Perhaps now is the time to apply creativity and study and BREATHE and thank God for the Blessing of Time we have been given. I have a “feeling” greatness will come out of all this. Great post, Ally!

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    1. AmyRose, well said. I agree that this pandemic has brought us all to a standstill. While I don’t mean to downplay its seriousness I do think, like you, that this could be a time for personal growth and learning. The old adage *bloom where you’re planted* as never been more true.

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      1. I’ve been “blooming where I’m planted” for years so I have a good head start on all this. No worries here. Fine adjustments here and there and life goes on as usual. I’m very interested to see what genius comes out of all this stupidity. (IMO)

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        1. Yes, I agree with you. This is stupidity. Could have been handled much better and without the sense of chaos, but now that we’re here I hope to see some genius in our future. Sooner rather than later.

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            1. Most interesting. Thanks for the link. I agree that our focus needs to be on not becoming fearful, but on remaining healthful. The idea of our vibrations contributing to our protection is fascinating. Food for thought.

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                  1. Teehee ….. Wish that were true for me. LOL I’m busier then ever ….. I recreated my life starting about 20 years ago after loosing my career, my social contacts, and my life as I knew it after a severe back injury. The blanks have been filled in and then some! LOL

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  6. I have a couple of containers of Clorox wipes (bought long before this). I travel with them (and it’s a big clunky can) now and use them on my steering wheel, door handles (inside and out) and my phone. Too bad there is no sanitation chamber we can walk through prior to entering a place. I still got my Starbucks this morning (take out only — no sitting and if you want sugar or milk, you have to order it). Business is down. Starbucks will be paying their folks but there are other businesses that can’t afford to do that. Hoping they make provisions for unemployment pay. On a personal note, wouldn’t you know it, today was my semi-annual haircut appointment. I’ll look like a wooly mammoth till this is over.

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    1. Kate, I’ve not tried to travel with Clorox wipes in the car. There’s something sensible about that idea. I keep the car clean, just not as well as you do! Of course maybe your energy for that comes from your daily Star$ addiction. 😉

      I postponed my haircut appointment, too. I made sure to rebook later in May so that my stylist knows I’m coming back later, just not now. It’s a difficult time to be in any service industry.

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  7. I’m usually at home all the time anyway so it doesn’t feel that much difference except now that I’m told I can’t go anywhere that’s exactly what I long to do.

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    1. Jean, I hear ‘ya. I’m having the same reaction to this quarantine. I like being at home, but the minute I heard I wasn’t supposed to go anywhere I wanted to go somewhere. Just ‘cuz.

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  8. I remember the quote about “germs and Jesus,” – catchy, true, and lighthearted enough for these grim times. What will come of this? Probably a boom in the birthrate 9-10 months from now. (Introverts and extraverts attract, you know!)

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  9. Never heard the first quote, but it seems apt. 😀 😁Love that Martin Kleppmann post! Who knows what great inventions will be birthed during this time? I’m using it to eat chocolate, myself. Oh and crochet, but not both at the same time.

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    1. L. Marie, I am relieved to know that you’re keeping your chocolates and your yarn separate. Obviously you’re keeping busy doing important things.

      I wish I knew the source of that first quote, but a quick Google search told me nothing– except that you can buy it on any number of decorative signs, presumably for your bathroom walls.

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  10. Interesting times indeed Ally Bean. I want to believe that something good will come from this but the pessimist within me see’s only trouble brewing before the good takes over.
    We now have higher than ever gun and ammo sales documented here in WA. That brings a sense of foreboding, but also perhaps an incentive to stay away from others as well.
    I see it as just another reason to be extra cautious when attempting to get a non-existent pack of TP off the store shelves. I’m not reaching for anything without a sense of serious caution.

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    1. Deb, I agree with you, I too have sense that things will get worse before better. I don’t know if that’s my natural cynicism or reality as I see it playing out in front of me.

      Guns have always been a big part of the culture where I live, so I don’t know that the existence of more of them will change much in that respect. People who collect [hoard?] them will continue to feel superior to all other people, but whether they’ll shoot us, who knows? Hope not.

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      1. I hope not as well Ally Bean. I suppose I associate the ramp up of sales in firearms with that social idea of survivalist planning. I know plenty of folks own and carry guns, but wonder if it’s those same folks buying more or others feeling they now need a more definitive method to get what they believe they need…?

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        1. Good question for which I have no answer. The whole gun culture is something that is often based on emotions/feelings, rather than rational thought. As such I don’t try to understand what appears to me to be inexplicable behavior, hoping that those of us with cooler heads will prevail.

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    1. Donna, there are lessons to be learned from history. First you’d hope that the lesson would be to take any virus seriously, but short of that one can learn to be productive when forced to stay at home. Hoping we see a surge in creativity as a result of this pandemic.

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  11. I would like to point out that Newton was celibate. Shakespeare had a wife in the country during the plague years who brought up his kids.

    Those of us trapped with spawn will be following our child’s curiosity while attempting to save as many pets, electronics, and breakables as possible during the Time of Isolation & Rain.

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    1. AutumnAshbough, I didn’t know that about Newton although I did know that about Shakespeare. Your point is taken and I wish you only the best as you live your life, with children, during the Time of Isolation & Rain. That is such a poetic way to describe these times. Nicely said.

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  12. Love the comments. I’ll just add that I noticed you said you made the quote box…already a fruit of your new-to-learn-during-this-time. Yay for you!
    BTW: never heard that saying until this post…must be a Presbyterian thing, like you say.

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    1. Laura, yes I agree that the comments have been wonderful on this post. That’s why I keep a blog at this point: to see what people have to say. I’d forgotten the childhood saying but when I remembered it I knew it’d make for a perfect thought, all things considered.

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  13. So many previous Commentors have mentioned my thoughts. My days won’t change all that much except knowing that I mustn’t go out and about makes me want to all the more.

    Even if Rick is eventually sent home, we got used to that dynamic when he was recovering from his back and shoulder surgeries.

    It’s the high school seniors that I feel so sad for. No prom, no graduation, no Last Day Of High School Ever…all of those huge and momentous things they will likely not get to experience. For some, no big deal, but for others…memories not made.

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    1. nance, “memories not made” is exactly how I’ve been thinking about the high school and college seniors. Those last weeks of school were such a giddy time, having finally achieved the goal, feeling such a sense of relief and joy. But you’re right those kids won’t have any memories like those and it makes me sad, too.

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  14. I’m safe at home with plenty of staples and TP. Picked a good time to retire, apparently – state of my investments, notwithstanding. Luckily I don’t need to touch them for many months.
    I’m seeing all these quotes about what creators came up with during self-isolation due to plagues and reading others urging us all to use to time to work on our life’s masterpieces. Oh, the pressure! Don’t people know this activity will distract me from obsessively refreshing my news feeds?! 😜😉

    Deb

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    1. Deb, obviously you are a wise woman who knows how to anticipate all contingencies, planning your retirement right when we need to stay away from each other. As for the pressure to be creative at home, I have broad shoulders so such pleas roll right off me. I’ll just continue to do my own thing in my own way, refreshing my news feeds hourly as I usually do, while writing these blog post masterpieces.

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  15. I worry, but what I can do about the situation and how much control do I have? I’m trying to balance reading, walking, running, TV and projects. So far, I’m falling down on the projects because they’re no fun to start. Maybe I have to get more bored first? I love the Isaac Newton info; I need some inspiration.

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    1. Margaret, I’m adapting each day to what needs to happen for us to remain safe. Not worried, more like aware. I wouldn’t concern yourself about starting your projects any time soon, seems as if this self-quarantine scenario is going to go on for months. They’ll be time for you to do the things. 😉

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  16. This might be just what we need as a society. A chance to slow down, pause, reflect, and breathe. We’ve become so focused on Go-Go-Go, that we don’t realize how much stress all that doing adds to our lives. Instead of hopping on a plane to “get away,” we can stay put and read a book. Instead of driving to a restaurant and waiting to be served, we can learn to cook our favorites at home. And, hopefully, a “Newton” among us will realize that Time Travel is do-able . . .

    Stay well, Ms. Bean!

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    1. Nancy, yes I agree with you. We live in a world in which many people seem intent on never sitting still, never being satisfied. It baffles me, but I’m a natural born sloth, happy to do less, enjoy more. Of course, I want to be a healthy sloth so I am all about cleanliness and learning a thing or two along the way. 🦥 [And now I know there is a sloth emoji. What a great day.]

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  17. “a wee little bean” I love that description of you! I had read the Issac Newton one on FB and thought about the weeks and weeks of empty calendar space I now have to resume my neglected murder mystery…..

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    1. Joni, as of yesterday my calendar is completely clear until May. It’s weird to look at it all blank, but if it’s for the best then so be it. I’m all for you resuming your murder mystery, as long as you remember to check in with your bloggy friends once in a while. Happy writing.

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      1. Oh I’ll still be blogging once a week as that is fun….the other writing not so much. Re clear calendar we’re pretty much shelter in place now except for groceries etc. Stay in and stay safe! except for walks – saw my first robin today so spring is on the way.

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  18. I spent the first couple of days after the “suggestion” to just stay home saying “AHA! I TOLD YOU SO!” to about 10 people who thought me a wee bit nutty for canceling my group activities and finishing my stocking of the pantry more than two weeks ago. I’m not one to usually do so, but these particular people needed that as well as me sticking my tongue out at them now due to their scoffing, dismissive hand waving, et al.

    I’m hoping to get a lot of writing and reading done. What will you be doing with this time, Ms. Bean? Anything creative? Reading good books?

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    1. Tara, I’m glad that you planned ahead and had the satisfaction of setting a few people straight about your smarts. Like I say: do no harm, but take no shit.

      I’ve many books to read, and games on my phone to play, and boxes of family photos and memorabilia to go through, and recipes to try, and walks to walk. Not worried about keeping myself entertained.

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      1. Yeah… YEAH!

        Introverts will survive this just fine. I do believe the extroverts in my life may drive me insane, though. 🙂 Enjoy the books and games and photos and recipes. I being walking more tomorrow, now that I’m done all my “duties” for prep, etc.

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  19. It will be very interesting to see how long the four of us can be together 24/7 without some major squabbles, especially since they’ve been occurring regularly even before the virus. Thank goodness for the studio, my little sanctuary. Also thank goodness I already worked from home and as I’ve said somewhere, maybe all these people who are telecommuting and conferencing will need to have their recorded discussions transcribed. I’ll be available for that! Stay safe. We are sheltered in place with a delivery of groceries, including the coveted toilet paper, supposed to occur this afternoon. 🙂

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    1. Janet, I’m pleased to hear that you’re safe and have something productive to do to occupy your time. Not surprised to learn of the squabbles, considering how this situation is stressful beyond the usual family stuff. We have yet to try having our groceries delivered. I venture forth bravely into the wilds of the grocery store, at least for now.

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      1. It was our first time with delivery too so we got free delivery and $20 off so even if we never do it again, it was worth it. The shelves were BARE when we went to the store on Sunday. We didn’t order meat or produce, the two things that I would be skeptical about having someone else pick out for me.

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        1. Thanks for that information about the process. I haven’t even looked into it. I’d be like you about having someone else pick out meat and produce. I can understand why home delivery is a good thing so we’ll see if we use it in the future.

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  20. Two introverts in this household so we are good! We were talking this morning about having plenty of proteins and starches, but not a good supply of partisables. Then, a text from a neighbor alerted us to the re-stocking of a local grocery store. Now, we have plenty of everything… for now.

    Interesting times, for sure. Stay well, Ally Bean!

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    1. Janis, Z-D is still working in an office instead of at home, so we’re good on a day-to-day basis. No hunkering down here entirely, yet. I don’t worry about entertaining myself at home, but I do wonder about getting fruits and vegetables. I thrive on them.

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  21. He-Man has been telecommuting for years so, we don’t have that to worry about, he’s still working.

    I’m backyard birding, taking my walk up to the mailbox, and painting at home since my class has been postponed. I suppose I should do Spring Cleaning, but blah! I’ve never been into that.

    We’re going to get through it. Stay well!

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    1. Deborah, you sound like you have this situation under control. I’m with you about not being a big fan of spring cleaning, but this year I might get more into it. Being at home all the time, don’t you know! Be safe.

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  22. I remember that “germs and Jesus“ as a cross stitch hanging in my babysitter’s bathroom when I was little. I stumbled upon one recently that I liked “wash your hands as thoroughly as if you just chopped jalapeños and now have to remove your contacts.”

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    1. Katie, I’m laughing out loud here. That’s a great saying that gets to the point of things, perhaps more memorably than the “germs and Jesus” saying. Thanks for the laugh.

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  23. So you’re telling me that nothing good can come of a quarantine. See-calculus.
    I don’t think I will be coming up with anything more than how many M&M’s can I shove up my nose without having to go to the flu hospital. But it’s a goal, so I am happy about that.

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    1. Writer McWriterson, you make an excellent point regarding calculus. It might not be the best example of something great for all people. I know I didn’t take it in school. As for your M&M goal, if that’s something that’ll make you feel good about yourself in these trying times then go for it. I, personally, would take the M&Ms and eat them. But I’m not as creative as you.

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  24. Allie,
    I didn’t think I could take another Coronavirus blog post, but you really found a way to make it entertaining and as always, your readers have the best comments.

    We are still going out and supporting our service industries until we have word that the virus has come to town. But all indoor group activities are canceled and the library is closed for two months – such a drag. But I have no shortage of reading and writing to do. Looks like my research trip is not going to pan out, either. Ah well. Hope all this blows over sooner than later and with a minimum of casualties.

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    1. Eilene, thank you. While I’m taking this virus seriously I do think that there have to be some moments when we all smile about things. I know if I didn’t I’d go bonkers.

      I’ve been grocery shopping, but I haven’t been in a restaurant or any other retail store for over a week now. We’re both easily amused at home so being here will be ok, although Zen-Den is still going to work downtown each day.

      I can understand why you won’t be coming this way for research. Sorry we won’t get to meet. Thanks for letting me know. Stay safe, be well.

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  25. I love, Love, LOVE that bit of information about Newton. Thank you for sharing, and inspiring, us binge watchers to do something… more 😉

    Just like Carl Sagan said, “All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.” You’ve inspired me to up the value of my social distancing (though don’t expect Calculus Strikes Back to come out of it :))

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    1. Endless Weekend, I’ve not read that Sagan quote about the unequal value, but I like. I don’t know that I’ll be doing anything here that is shifts a paradigm, but I do have a few ideas about a few things. Now is the time to immerse myself in my projects, while washing my hands hourly, of course.

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  26. I love your message, gentle writer, Ally. Follow our curiosity. I agree with one of your comments, too…..don’t dismiss the gravity of this pandemic, but I do think that perspective helps everyone stay rational.” Last week, I heard how a woman began screaming non stop in our Costco, losing it. Not a good thing. I want to err on the side of rational. Nice to always have you in my personal space, Ally. xx

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    1. Erica/Erika, thank you! I wonder if the woman who lost it in your CostCo had a few other issues before this pandemic began. And the stress of this situation sent her over the edge. I’ve not doubt that could and will happen. I imagine as we go along we’ll all reveal who we really are, for better or worse. Seen a bit of worse already, truth be known.

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  27. I’ve been in “checking-in” mode myself, so I appreciate your post. All is well here in Northern Ontario – our communities are following all of the protocols and closing or limiting public access to all but the essentials – the bug hasn’t made it here – yet – but it will.

    I’ve been urging people to be kind, remember to breathe (through a mask, if you must) and yes, wash your hands!

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    1. Maggie, it sounds like you’re on top of the situation where you are. I suspect you’re right in that the virus will find you eventually, but as long as you can minimize its impact you’ll be ahead of the game.

      I like your focus on being kind. So far when I’ve been to the grocery, for the most part, people have been kind– but the stores aren’t fully stocked and it’s chaos trying to find what you need to buy. Not a relaxing experience if’n you get my drift.

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  28. I’m an introvert and normally feel quite comfortable at home. This is kind of strange because you know you can’t just run an errand if you feel like taking a break. But, our ancestors did a lot more with less, so we’ll stay home, do our part to hopefully help flatten the curve, and then return to a more normal routine. I do wish someone could clear the beaches around the country so the spring breakers don’t extend the time the rest of us have to shelter in place, but I think the problem is ‘wishing.’

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    1. Judy, I feel the same way as you. I’m at home most of the time but I dart out to the grocery or hardware store without much thought about it. That flexibility is what I like about being at home. You make a good point about our ancestors so look to the past. And I like your wish for the present, but getting college kids to not go on spring break might be impossible. They are healthy and know it all! 😉

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      1. Have you seen the pixs of the beaches in Florida, Padre Island, Galveston? Jam packed still. Galveston (city limits) closed all entertainment venues, bars and restaurants (expect for deliver/curbside/takeout) but not until after St Patrick’s Day. As you say, the “bullet proof” mentality. I also hope there’s not a huge spike in younger cases in a week or so – how will they trace back where they have been. Disturbing data from Italy showing the younger group not as protected as they thought. And we’ll all be stuck inside longer! (add grumpy face here)
        Take care

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        1. I’ve seen the beach photos. I’d say that if next week there is a spike in novel coronavirus cases among that age demographic, then there’ll be no way to trace its source. I wonder where all of this is going to lead, but can only do my best to keep us safe. What other people do may ultimately harm me, but I cannot stop what they do. Que sera, sera…

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          1. At times like these, you can only take care of your own pack ( and we all here count in that, too, right:? HAHA)
            …oh, you can wash incoming cans/bottles lightly with soap and water or use spray antibacterial spray, or those antibacterial wet wipes….it gives my husband something to do as we are stuck home – everything is closing here – but no traffic for once. HaHa. Paper money/coins is suspect just as much.
            If you use that hand gel a lot, be sure to also use hand cream as the gel dries out skin and cause it to crack opening it up to infections (Kid’s a doc. They have always had to be careful of that in hospitals.) 40% of cases are in the 20-45 age groups…”They/experts who are supposed to be guiding people” say “they just didn’t have all the data to tell people before”….which is not exactly the entire truth.
            Basically – stay away from people!
            Take care and blog on…you always give a smile

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            1. Thanks for the tips about what to do. Just about everything is closed here, too. I’m comfortable staying away from people so in some ways this plays into my wheelhouse. Silver lining I suppose.

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  29. These are trying times for sure Ally … for me, it is not a big adjustment since I work from home and have done so since 2011 and not seen my boss in person since 2012 – we communicate solely by e-mail and phone and occasionally he drops off dictation tapes or mails them to me. I have no family and only one friend now who lives in the area, so no unexpected guests bearing germs dropping by. I am hoping our state does not go to a “shelter in place” mode so I can still enjoy walks but maybe they will have to be curtailed too if we go that route. It is said that Shakespeare wrote some of his finest works quarantining himself during the Plague. Every day there is something else – our Governor (Gretchen Whitmer – D )is sparring with Trump as he feels she has gone too far in declaring a state emergency (last Thursday already, and before he declared it a national emergency) and many people rose to her defense and the bickering between Ds and Rs got pretty intense on Twitter because of those Tweets. Our Governor now wants no more gatherings of more than 10 people – we stand at 65 people testing positive with COVID-19 but no deaths … yet. Stay safe.

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    1. Linda, I wonder in the end how often this virus will be spread because of family togetherness and how often because of going into the world? No answer yet, but some scientist will figure it out. We’re good here, but Z-D still goes to work so difficult to know what’ll happen next. If nothing else more people on this street are going for walks, which should make the family care doctors happy.

      I didn’t know that Trump was feuding with your Governor, but am not surprised. He’s incapable of anything verging on rational thought so a smart woman is too much for him. As we’ve all seen over and over again. Stay safe and be well. The mantra for our times.

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      1. It would be interesting to know the ratio Ally. If one family member ventures out to work and five members stay at home due to their school or work situations – were some members “spreaders” while they were still at work and/or school so we just assume the only person going out in the world is the culprit for contaminating the family?

        Good luck with Z-D going to work; my boss is going too, though our business has slowed to a crawl. He teaches a labor law class at University of Detroit Mercy and had to learn how to Skype for last night’s class. He said the office building is mostly vacant these days.

        Yes, Trump didn’t like how proactive Whitmer was so he lashed out in his usual slamming manner and she responded to him in kind, by giving him a few Tweets representing the timeline of how she has taken charge in Michigan, where he had not done anything. She is rallying for more ventilators. He likely doesn’t care for her as she was the Democratic response to his SOU message. I read the comments by others – whoa!

        You stay safe too Ally.

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        1. I’ve never Skyped so if I needed to do so I’d have to learn how to do it, too. I hope your boss enjoys this new way of teaching.

          I looked at the link. Thanks, I think. Clearly The Donald is a fool, so your governor was only pointing out the obvious. Have you seen the hashtag #TrumpLiedPeopleDied? That one seems to be getting to the heart of the matter.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Robb is enjoying the class this way Ally, although our office building is less than a mile away from University of Detroit Mercy and he is Skyping from work. We’ve slowed down a lot the past week, so he’s been creating a lot of handouts for his students – they have 2X as much to read now! I looked at the handout from the University on how to set up Skype for the students – it looked complicated to me.

            You’re welcome for that link – I am glad our governor could substantiate what she’s done to date and reply so quickly. Today she’s made arrangements for the National Guard to deliver supplies to hospitals, health departments, etc. We’ve grown to 336 people with COVID-19 in one week; last Thursday it was two people. I was following that hashtag #TrumpLiedPeopleDied when it was trending and I agree that it got to the heart of the matter. Today the media was blamed for making it appear nothing was done by this administration. SMH.

            Liked by 1 person

  30. I verbally am berating myself about the fact that I continue to touch my face on a regular basis. I just can’t seem to stop. My wife says the rules about it right now only apply to when one is outside and not at home, though I’m not sure I agree with that view. Still, as I’m reading others’ blog posts, news stories, etc., I can’t seem to break the habit of holding my chin, rubbing my cheeks, probably touching my mouth, etc. For me anyway, it’s becoming an extremely tough habit to break. Thankfully, though, there are three faucets with soap in our home, so I’m hitting them up regularly! Keep them hands clean, Ally. 😉 – Marty

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Marty, as a teenager with acne-prone skin I learned to not touch my face or else I’d make myself look worse. I don’t know that the logic behind why I learned this behavior will work for you, though.

      Maybe you need to do that rubber band thing where you wear one on your wrist and snap it hard when you’ve done something wrong to remind yourself to not do it again. Or just wash your hands obsessively and let the cards/virus fall where they may. Stay healthy, my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Very well said, I agree with the Newton’s example. One needs to be creative and free of anxiety and worries. Anyway, the whole world is talking about precautions and why not we just look the brighter side.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Amen to both quotes. And I had to chuckle at the second one as my 19yo son, in his first year of Uni is currently doing all his calculus studied online. These sure are strange times we’re living in. Stay well and safe Ally. And keep smiling. That’s what we need, not manic fear.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Miriam, thanks for stopping by to read and comment on this post. I cannot imagine what it is like to be a college student today. I don’t mean to minimize what is happening, but perspective is everything, eh?

      Liked by 1 person

  33. With everyone staying in, the sounds of all the birds singing in the mornings isn’t covered up by traffic and yard crews. The dog walks are even more pleasant and relaxed. (We just ignore the sound of oak pollen falling on my hat). And there’s not as much worry as the squirrels scamper across the streets. And no one has to worry about being late for something. Maybe some unexpected benefits ( but then again, we don’t have any kids here driving us crazy)

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    1. philmouse, today is the first day that Z-D will be working from home, so our days are going to get easier, less stressful because of that. I’ve noticed fewer cars on the street and more people out on the street instead. Kids are playing outside during the day which makes for some unexpected noise, but good noise, you know?

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  34. I’ve been steady with not panicking and even trying to see the humor when possible. I probably took it a little too lightly as I don’t watch the news and I really didn’t follow this until last Friday. So, I had a little panic tonight and panic is not helpful. Watching others panic has scared me more than anything besides reminiscing about The Stand. I called my brother tonight and feel better now. Staying at home is not a big deal for me, I am usually at home. And I will try and relax and not imagine a Stephen King future. I hope everyone I see online is staying happy and healthy.

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    1. Zazzy, I limit how much and where I read news so while I stay informed I don’t get sucked into stories like many people do. I can see how you didn’t know much about it until you did. Of course now that you know what’s up, I’m glad you had your brother to talk with about it. I’ve never read any Stephen King books or seen any of his movies, but I understand your point. I don’t believe that this pandemic means the end of civilization, a la some doomsayers, but I’ll admit that I’d like this germ-y virus to die away, never to return.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I agree with you Ms. Bean. And now, by the way, is not the time to start reading dystopian novels. Ultimately I believe we will get through this but I think many of us have some moments of terror of the what-ifs.

        Liked by 1 person

  35. Fun quote. And what about Ben Franklins famous quote: “Cleanliness is next to Godliness.” But wait, I just looked it up (curiosity in the time of coronavirus) and it was first used in a sermon by John Wesley? Huh. Well, we are living in place, reading/writing/talking with so many friends on phone and e-mail. Re-connecting, because we have the time. Lots of love around, and love makes the world go round, so maybe love will help us get through this crisis.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Pam, I’d forgotten about that BF/JW quote but it might be the basis of the Germs Jesus saying from my childhood. I’ve been checking in with people irl who are Christmas Card Mailing List Friends. All seem well, but a trifle bored. I’ve also been checking in with bloggy friends, with mixed results. There’s a bit of snarl in some corners of the blogosphere. Still, I’m with you about how love will get us through this pandemic. And clean hands, of course.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I don’t think anyone has anything nice to say about the pandemic. You’re not alone on that point. Thank you for checking in here. I can only imagine how difficult your life is right now. Stay safe, be well.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Forget the extroverts (although I am one too!), I’m more worried if we go into lockdown that I’m going to go stir crazy from not being able to go running. I need open air and endless paths. No treadmill for me please.
    Germ-free days and thought-filled nights to you too! (I quite like that as a send off!)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joey, I’d be pleased with myself if I managed to organize a few closets during this self-quarantine. And try some new recipes. I’ve no illusion that I’ll ever be as significant as Newton, and I’m ok with that.

      Like

  37. I have to admit that the list of online training courses I’d like to take is approaching the length of my books-to-be-read list – and that’s decidedly dangerous. But … I seem to have less time on my hands at the moment than previously. I’m calling my mother daily, allowing the chat to ramble wherever she needs it to, and walk for 5 minutes in every hour to regain full mobility in my knee & have exercises to fit in for the same purpose. The end of the day comes & I’ve made no progress on either those training courses or my reading. But hey, it’s keeping me occupied 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Deb, all things in due time, she says philosophically. If and when you get around to taking the courses, you’ll enjoy them. And if you never take them, so be it. At least you had the fun of thinking about taking them.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ally, I have and one of the things that I’m seeing recommended at the moment is that we take the time to dream a bit, especially about stuff we’d like to do when we can again. Thank you for reminding me of that.

        Liked by 1 person

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