Out For A Walk: “Love You, Annie”

IN ANTICIPATION OF A haircut appointment tomorrow, I’ve been trying to decide what to do about my graying blonde hair. “Gronde” as it’s known in hair salon lingo.

Out for a walk yesterday I was lost in my thoughts, contemplating this very important issue, when I walked by a property under construction.  There were men working on the outside of the building.

As I walked by I heard one of them shout at me: “Love you, Annie.”

This made no sense to me but I smiled, waved my hand at him, and continued on with my walk.

ABOUT HALF A BLOCK later it occurred to me in a hey-wait-a-minute moment that I may have misheard what the guy shouted at me.

That what the man shouted at me was: “Love you, Granny.”

Meaning that from afar I appeared to be, of all things, a grandmother.

Peeved and dismayed as I was by this disturbing realization that shook my ego to its core, it dawned on me that I had my answer about what to do about my gronde hair.

Hence, tomorrow’s hair appointment will include highlights, lowlights– and any other lights available– to reduce the grayness in my fading blonde hair.

Because Granny?!

Me thinks not.

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Ally Bean

Observant. Creative. Humorous. Adaptable. Happy enough. Looking for the crumb of truth in the cookie of life.

86 thoughts on “Out For A Walk: “Love You, Annie””

  1. Well, I’m a firm believer in doing What’s Best For You based upon You. Period. If you feel more like You with blonder hair, then okay. If you are ready to go grey gracefully, then do that.
    I’m not one for The Upkeep that coloring requires. Hence, I have the Lily Munster look. But with bangs.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. nance, I agree with you completely. My plan is to let the gray continue to show while adding a bit of blonde highlights mixed in. As I’ve been highlighting my hair since I was 19, a few more years of doing so won’t break the bank. But eventually, I will be gray.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Not sure what you favour, but ‘barley’ seems to be popular at the moment, which I think is meant to be a sort of silvery blonde, and then of course there is the jeans dye job…I tend to think of this as a modern come-back of the blue-rinse look that little old ladies had back when I was little, but I’m not very sophisticated, unlike the (young) people that seem to go for that look.

    Hope the new do does it for you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. @breakerofthings, I don’t know anything about “barley” but maybe that’s a fancy way of saying “gronde.” I could be silvery blonde and happy, but there will be no blue hair for me, thank you very much. 😉

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    1. Maggie, yes, that could be another interpretation. Obviously I wasn’t paying close enough attention to what was really going on. But I had gray-headed worries of my own to think about, not the goofy men on the construction site. 🙂

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  3. So funny! Had you thought that in the moment you could have yelled something appropriate back…”Don’t wet your bed tonight honey!” As for hair, Lady Clairol and I are going to the grave together. My bestie was more of a platinum blonde and greyed beautifully. I’m much more honey blonde and it’s disastrous. Quite dingy. Do what works for you! My granddaughter did the purple hair thing over the weekend. Yikes! She HAD gorgeous hair prior to that. Hopefully it will wash out soon.

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    1. Kate, I didn’t think of a single comeback. Of course I was halfway down the street when I realized what the man had yelled at me. Probably proving that I’m closer to being a grandma than a hot chick!

      I’m more platinum blonde, or was. I think that I’ll be able to ease into gray, but I know what you mean about honey blonde. My stylist is honey blonde. It’s a gorgeous color, but doesn’t lend itself to a graceful sashay into gray.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. bobcabkings, if only someone else had been around I could have rationalized that the man was shouting at the other person. But alas, he was talking to me.

      Of course, the whole situation has made for a good blog post, so I’m not too distressed about it. But granny…?!!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m a grandmother, so I don’t care if I look like one. In fact, all my life I’ve been training to be a lil ol lady, so you know, hashtag goals.
    HOWEVER, I haven’t colored my hair since November, because I’ve wanted to see what’s going on up there, and I’ll have you know, it’s grayer than I thought, but not gray enough to let it go yet. Not silver enough to be attractive on its own, in my opinion.
    I’ve been debating on a recolor, or highlights, and my hair lady is moving house, so… I think I might be approaching my breaking point. I now feel like people are looking at me like something is askew atop. I think one more color, then hair lady will be all settled in and ready to highlight me.
    I hope you’re pleased with your outcome 🙂

    Annie.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joey, I’ve no problem with the family concept of being a grandmother. Relationships are a given. Congrats on being one. That’s normal and cool.

      I’m bothered by the dubious way in which “granny” is used by our society to conjure up images of decrepitude. That’s my hang-up.

      As for a brunette going gray, I realize that it’s a much more significant change in how you see yourself than it is for a blonde. We just kind of fade into gray, while you have to face the issue straight on.

      Will wait to see what you decide to do next, but am sure that you’ll look great no matter what. To each her own vis-à-vis hair color.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. When I was younger, my hair was a dishwater blonde, and I often lightened, highlighted, or whatever it took to have a pretty blonde color. Now that I’m growing more “mature”, it’s ironic that my hair has lost its pigment and is a slightly grayed platinum blonde without the effort it used to take. There is always hope.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Carol, your hair sounds like it might be the same as mine. My stylist assures me that in a few years I’ll be a naturally shiny gray color that will require nothing more than cuts. I’m looking forward to being that “mature.”

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I also want to know if gronde is a made up word. It’s great! Seriously, I had a few belly laughs at this post thank you! 28 years ago I was at the bank with infant son in tow, the teller said oooo how sweet! Is he your grandchild? I told my sis who lives elsewhere and she’d had a similar thing happen to her with her small child in tow, at a bank! We could only laugh! Good luck with the changes!!

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    1. Susan, I’m not clever enough to come up with the word “gronde.” It was told to me by a hair stylist– so, you know, I’m just going with it.

      I love your story from the bank and agree that you have to laugh at the whole gray hair thing. Or at least, if you’re an emotionally stable woman you laugh at it. Just saying…

      Liked by 1 person

  7. What a terrible thing for that guy to yell out! Even if those weren’t his words, he was cat-calling you regardless. That always gives me the skeeves.

    I’m all for coloring our hair until we reach the time of our lives when we’re comfortable with gray hair, and what it means to us symbolically. For everyone, that’s different. Gray hair at the age of 40 or 50 to me symbolizes stress!

    My mom colored hers till the day she died, and she was in her mid-80s. Personally, I think that’s overkill. At some point, certainly by the time someone is in their 80s, we should embrace the idea that gray hair can also symbolize longevity.

    We could say the same about wrinkles, you know, but I would never get a face lift or do Botox or anything like that. Not sure why I draw the line there (pun intended). Why do I agree with coloring our gray but not straightening our skin? It’s a thinker.

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    1. Kate, I was surprised about the cat-calling, considering we’re in the middle of suburbia here. Go figure.

      My mother never colored her dark brunette hair. She grayed in dramatic perfect face-framing swatches so that the evolution of her hair looked wonderful– planned even. Eventually she had all white hair and it looked great on her.

      I should be so lucky.

      I understand how you feel about botox and all the other stuff. For a few years more I’ll continue having my hair highlighted, but to inject chemicals into my skull so as to not have wrinkles, I dunno. Kind of creeps me out. But I know a lot of women who do it, so there you go.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. At almost 58 I can’t bring myself to let the gray go wild just yet. I have dull brown hair without any color in it anyway, so I use that as my excuse to cover up the returning gray roots on a fairly regular basis. As to that remark, well my feminist agenda on sexist language feels that it was highly uncalled for and obviously rude, but I also fear that I would be just as confused as you were, and also not have had a great comeback even if I was sure of what I heard in the first place. There was a time and place when I would have ignored any remark, now…I’m feeling a bit more bold in my need and ability to speak up. And speaking of patriarchal, sexist things…why in the hell are men nearing 60 and graying called distinguished and women get ridiculous made up names to describe their own aging process…”gronde”!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Deb, I did something wrong with the comment reply. Sorry. You got the wrong reply, but I have no idea how I did that considering I hadn’t read your comment yet. Oh well, whatever…

      As for how much longer I’ll be fighting the grayness, I realize that in a few years, being a blonde, this will be a non-issue. And I’m grateful for that because unless I want to spend thousands in upkeep, I’ll just age appropriately and become gray. But it is weird that an arbitrary comment from some guy got me thinking down this path.

      I agree with you about the inherently sexist word “gronde.” I hadn’t thought of that before, but you are so right. I’m distinguished, dammit. Inspiring, even. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. If I didn’t color my hair it would be a very dull dishwater blonde. I don’t have much gray yet (my mother was about 50% gray when she died at age 83), but I am sort of looking forward to having more since gray hair is supposed to be coarser and my hair is straight and wimpy. I think I would have giving that guy the one-finger granny salute.

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    1. Janis, funny that for me with naturally curly hair they tell me my hair will be softer and more manageable once it grays! It’s always something, isn’t it?

      I didn’t think of a thing to do except wave vaguely in the guy’s direction. I was really deep in thought, I guess. Next time, however!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Maybe he thought your name was Annie instead of Ally? Love the granny cartoon. My hair has been showing a few grays here and there but it is so thin and I have so little of it that any hair is good hair to me. Pondering the question further though, I wonder if I dyed it if it would look like I have more hair? On the other hand, with my luck, I’d have some kind of reaction and it all would fall out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Janet, don’t do something that’d make your hair fall out. Think of the mess! 🙂

      Maybe the guy knew me and got my name wrong, but I have no idea who he was. Maybe I looked like someone he knew, although this is a huge city and the chances of that are slim? I dunno. It was odd, but has made for some good laughs.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. This made me chuckle, not at your expense but at your delivery of the material. Too funny, and I suspect it’s only a matter of time before it happens to me. My hair isn’t gray yet, but according to my teen sons, I’m already well into Granny Land!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Carrie, I like your term Granny Land. No doubt my clothes say I’m there already, but my hair? Geez louise, I thought I had that issue under control. Well, at least I will by tomorrow at this time. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  12. What I did about my ‘gronde’ (what a great term!) was to have it bleached platinum blonde. That way the grey sort of blends in, it’s white (which is in keeping with my mature years) and I can still say I’m a blonde. Well I AM. And I always thought Jean Harlow, Marilyn Monroe, and other cutie/beauties were so sophisticated with their platinum..maybe it’ll rub off on me! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Embeecee, I like your approach. It makes you happy and adds a bit of mystique to your persona. I’m sure that people say: “look at that sophisticated platinum blonde over there.” Not a soul will notice your gray hairs. Clever girl.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. My version is that he confused you with someone else and said ‘love you Annie’. But if I’m wrong, the silver lining is that being a grandmother does come with many perks. Just saying!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Donna, I wonder if you’re right about the name mix-up. None of this exchange was threatening, so who knows? And you make an excellent point about the grandmother thing, as long as it is referring to a familial relationship and not to an ancient woman, I’m ok with it. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  14. I’m rather when my time comes, my hair goes the way of my aunt’s, which like your mom just grayed just enough to add some pizazz to her look but not enough to require a separate savings account to pay for colorings.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Allie P, I hope that is how it happens for you. It’s the easiest way to morph into gray– and look glam along the way. I, of course, have different coloring so I fear looking like a frizzy dirty Q-tip, instead of a stylish older woman. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Getting shouted at still? He must have thought you were pretty cool for an old lady HAHA
    I probably would have shouted back something like “Hey, there baby cakes” without thinking. What a jumble of characters there are in the world.
    I don’t have time or energy (or money) for highlighting or constant hair care. Tried that a couple of years ago – and it looked great at first, but then after several highlights, low lights, and assorted mixes, may hair rebelled win color and condition. Grew all that out and stopped worrying. Besides, I rarely see myself, so I can just pretend – reality is what we decide HAHA
    Just do what makes you happy and dance on

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    1. philmouse, I didn’t think of the shout from the the point of view that I must be a cool old lady. I LIKE HOW YOU THINK.

      If what the stylist tells me is true, I’ll gradually glide into silver-y blonde hair that will then go gray/white. I can deal with that, so I’ll dance on with highlights for a few more years.

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  16. Your hair has always looked nice, no matter what! I agree with everyone else. Do what makes YOU happy!
    I always hated my hair growing up, but I like it much better now. I suppose when I start going grey, like yours, it will just get lighter. And that will be OK.
    I don’t like the term Granny, but I call myself Grammy. I don’t know why. It just seems to sound better to me. Maybe because it sounds like an award..Ha! Being one sure is keeping me in shape!

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    1. Beth, I tend to almost always do what makes me happy! It’s part of being a free spirit, I guess.

      As for the hair, I’ll get a few highlights, then re-evaluate in a few months. It’s not like it’s a permanent change, like a face lift!

      I agree about Grammy being better than Granny. Grammy sounds hip. Granny reminds me of The Beverly Hillbillies– not so hip!

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      1. I never thought of Granny on the Beverly Hillbillies! Ha ha ha!!
        You’ll have to post pictures of your highlights.
        You are definitely a free spirit. Yay!!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Se, I would think blond hair wouldn’t show the gray as much. (Read: at all.) There goes that hope. Thanks for the warning, love, another blond.

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  18. What a great post – made me laugh, taught me a new word, and had me thinking about hair. I’ve got one very precious silver hair that I artfully arrange everyday so it’s front and center and ready to catch any available light and dazzle anyone who might look. So far apparently no one has noticed. 😦

    But it’s not stopping me from calling myself an alchemist – turning brunette hair into silver, now that’s something to celebrate.

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    1. Deborah, you raise an excellent point about the alchemy of hair color change. Brilliant observation. I imagine that your silver strand, artfully placed, dazzles all who see it. But just wait until there is more than one strand with which you must deal. Let’s see what happens to you then…

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    1. In My Cluttered Attic, I appreciate your good manners in not yelling at me. I always knew you were one of the good ones. Happy weekend right back at you!

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  19. Many younger friends or the same age ones are grannies, and I REALLY want to be one! But I don’t want anyone thinking I look old enough to be a grandmother. A bit hypocritical of me, I know. I unapologetically die my hair. But when I went out with Alison, she kept complimenting me on how GREAT I look for 60, then asked me, “Have you had botox?” HAHA, doesn’t she know me better than that? I wear my life on my face, and am proud of it. I guess her boyfriend’s mother has had it, so she was just wondering. 🙂

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    1. Margaret, it’s not the actual family relationship of being a granny that bothers me, it’s the implication that being one means you’re dowdy and decrepit. Plus, how awful did my hair actually look? As of yesterday I now have a more medium blonde color so I feel/look better. But really…

      Alison didn’t know that you hadn’t had Botox? That’s hilarious. Obviously you look great, but still… that child should know her mother better than that.

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      1. I think she knew, but wasn’t sure exactly what people look like when they have botox. She’s 27 after all. But perhaps she thinks that since I die my hair, botox is just a step up from that. Ashley knows EXACTLY what people with botox look like since she lives in LA, plastic surgery capital of the world. Some very “interesting” people down there!!

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        1. Margaret, around here women as young as 30 are already doing the Botox thing, so Alison is not too far away from possibly trying it herself! I don’t care for the Botox frozen face look, but I’m lead to understand [by an acquaintance who works in a plastic surgeon’s office] that young women think that having no expression on their faces makes them sophisticated. o_O

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  20. What is wrong with people that shouting a comment intended to be insulting to a complete stranger for no reason is considered ok? Sorry, but this really burned my butt.

    Rock your hair regardless of what colour you decide on!!

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    1. Joanne, I get what you’re saying. All I can think is that the man shouting at me thought: 1) he knew me [Annie]; 2) he didn’t consider the comment to be insulting [love you]; OR 3) he considered it ok [flattering?] to harass a woman walking by herself in suburbia. This will go down in my personal history as one of my weirdest walks. :-/

      And yesterday the hair color I chose is a medium blonde with some natural silvery highlights courtesy of Mother Nature. Not so granny, but decidedly age-appropriate.

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  21. I had a granny that we grandchildren called Granny (To distinguish her from our other grandmother, who got the title Grandma). Unfortunately, modern grandmothers don’t seem to care for either word anymore…. but particularly “Granny” which has almost achieved the status of a slur against older women. It does take a lot of guts to call a random stranger Granny, though….

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    1. evilsquirrel13, you explained it well. I take offense at being called granny, even if I was one– which I’m not. And as for the guy who yelled this at me, I dunno… some people crave attention, I guess.

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