Talking Turkey: One Sorry Not Sorry, One Grumble Avoided

Late afternoon sunlight as seen through trees with leaves turned golden in autumn.

Today is Tuesday. 🗓

This means that if you live in the United States [and if you celebrate Turkey Day] then tomorrow is Thanksgiving Day Eve followed by Thanksgiving Day on Thursday.

I’m not sure if I could’ve made the previous paragraph more convoluted, but probably.  I was trying to be clear and informative, logical even.

Just talking turkey, you know. 😉

It’ll be the two of us celebrating Thanksgiving together this year, most years actually.  We’ve a turkey breast currently in the freezer that I’ll start thawing in the refrigerator soon.  And we’ve the ingredients to make some of the fixings that traditionally go with a turkey dinner.

The usual suspects waiting to be part of Thanksgiving dinner.

YEP to mashed potatoes and stuffing and cranberry sauce and gravy, but NOPE to green bean casserole and yams with little marshmallows.  You may consider those last two sides part of the traditional Thanksgiving Day dinner, but I don’t like them so we’re not gonna have ’em.

Sorry not sorry, don’t even try to convince me otherwise. 🤨

All that’s left for me to do is to go to the bakery to pick up some pies, cherry and pumpkin this year, then get home safely.  Starting today and for the next few days I try to stay away from grocery stores, parking lots around said, and people within.

I’ve learned that Thanksgiving week is one doozy of a chaotic shopping experience in grocery stores.  Generally speaking the shoppers be frenzied, with long lists in hand.  The best thing I can do is stay far away, giving everyone the space they need to shop, while I go home not grumbling about people.

Well, at least not grumbling about the ones in the stores. 🛒

Blue sky with rusty orange leaves, the epitome of an autumn palette.

QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

What don’t you like about the traditional Thanksgiving Day dinner? What do you like?

Do you have a sorry not sorry about Thanksgiving, or this week in general?

Tell all in the comments below. 

197 thoughts on “Talking Turkey: One Sorry Not Sorry, One Grumble Avoided

  1. I hate anything that requires fuss and expectations. I’ve gone through three rounds with my Mom about dinner so far. She has a Norman Rockwell paining in mind when in reality the event is always Picasso. I would much rather go out to eat so everyone gets to relax. This year that isn’t possible due to my dads illness, but my mom is still making too much of a production. Personally, I’d like a bucket of KFC with all the trimmings

    Liked by 6 people

    • LA, I’m with you. I could easily skip a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, and be happy with any ole thing to eat. We didn’t always have the traditional dinner when I was a kid, so I’m flexible. I hope your mother chills out about her Normal Rockwell dinner… but I doubt that she will.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You know the worst part? She’s been caregiver to my dad and she’s exhausted. I wanted to bring in a catered meal. She said no. So I tried to compromise and say ok make stuffing (my dads not really eating and it’s his favorite) and then all of a sudden she wants to make mashed potato (again my dad lives and easy for him to eat) but then she wants to make a turkey breast and I gritted my teeth cause really turkey is least appetizing food ever. Then yesterday she’s talking about all the other things while simultaneously complaining about taking care of my dad, but still saying oh it doesn’t take any time to make these things…😆😆😆😖😖and I finally say that I will throw out the window anything she makes other than potatoes and stuffing and ILl bring/cook everything else. Arghhhhh

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  2. Years ago, a now ex-sister-in-law, used to make the revolting green bean casserole (a dish that has one thing going for it, a PR campaign that pretends it’s on everyone’s table). No one in the family touched it but her, and she happily brought the leftovers home with her. Since the divorce many years ago, we have lived happily without having to even look at it. Oh, she also made the marshmallow thing one year. Same.

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  3. Agree …. Stay away from the grocery stores unless one MUST go! … and I don’t like yams either! When I was growing up, my mother would also cook (as a side dish) lasagna or ravioli (homemade). The first time my wife came for this, she couldn’t believe it. Wishing you and yours a wonderful Thanksgiving.

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  4. One word – stuffing. After all, when else do we have it (or even think about having it)? The rest – well, I’m the one having it/not having it with you, so my sorry/not sorry is your sorry/not sorry.

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    • Well reasoned, Z-D. You’re right about the stuffing. It’s a once a year thing, so I don’t mind making it, country-style of course. I like how you’ve come to realize that my sorry not sorry is your sorry not sorry. 😉

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  5. After two years of no family around, we are looking forward to a traditional meal this year. We will still have a small gathering with my son and his two children. I make our traditional meal, but I am including carrot cake this year at the request of my grandson. I never make candied yams – way too sweet. No green bean casserole for us either. I do make my grandmother’s cranberry salad – yep, bring on the Jello! We are all about comfort at our house. No dressing up – heck wear sweats if you so desire. For us, it is all about family. We could just as easily have grilled cheese and that would enough.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Maggie, I like the traditional Thanksgiving meal once a year… if I have to. I think carrot cake is a brilliant addition to the menu and will keep that in mind for future years. I agree that yams are too sweet which is why I don’t like them.

      I have an old recipe for cranberry sauce made with Jell-O but this year it’s the canned stuff for us. And as for dressing up, we don’t do that either. As a kid this dinner was formal, but now it’s much. more. relaxed. Hallelujah!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. “the shoppers be frenzied” indeed, Ally! I have to make a second trip to the store today to pick up my turkey and I am NOT looking forward to it!

    My favorite part of the Thanksgiving feast is the mashed potatoes, drenched in gravy of course. Everything else I could live without. I do wish that the other people in my family cared less about dressing and sweet potatoes, because if they did, I could jettison those in favor of some delicious caramelized brussels sprouts. YUM.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Suzanne, best of luck with your trip to the grocery today. I shudder at the thought, but a woman’s gotta do what a woman’s gotta do!

      I love mashed potatoes, too. The rest of the traditional Thanksgiving meal is just bling in my opinion. Carmelized Brussel sprouts sound delicious. Give me those with my mashed potatoes, please 😋

      Liked by 2 people

  7. I am not really a fan of any of the traditional foods except mashed potatoes (there is no bad form of a potato as long as the potato is thoroughly cooked).

    I like most of the foods, but not in Thanksgiving form. (Except for stuffing, which has onions and onions are delicious in NO form and are banned from my kitchen.) I like cranberries in upside down cake, or scones, or muffins. Pumpkin pie becomes pumpkin cheesecake with a gingersnap crust. Turkey is best in sandwich form. Sweet potatoes should be made into fries and dipped in maple syrup.

    The nice thing about hosting a feast is that you can cook it exactly as you like it. 🙂

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  8. I don’t do the candied yams or green bean casserole, either. I make the dressing ahead of time so as to free up the oven for the turkey, and I can reheat it while the turkey rests.

    Little by little, I’ve pared down the menu–no rolls, only one veg, no sweet potatoes–but I still wish it were easier. I make two pumpkin pies, but I hate pumpkin pie. I end up eating whipped cream and chocolate syrup for my dessert, if I have one at all.

    By the time I’ve made the whole dinner, planned and prepped and smelled it for so long, I rarely eat much of it. I prefer it leftover the next day when it’s much more relaxed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • nance, I like your planning, your revised menu, and your conclusion about eating the leftovers the next day. Thanksgiving dinner in its traditional form is labor intensive and creates more dirty dishes than any other meal I make. I’m with you about pumpkin pie, which is why I ordered a cherry one, too.

      We’ll be making dinner together so that makes it easier, but the thing about Thanksgiving dinner is that it just doesn’t happen. Ever. It is the opposite of my word of the year, simplify. 😏

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  9. Thanksgiving your way – good for you Ally.

    I like almost everything on the table. My gripe is with the people who insist that corn doesn’t belong at the feast. This includes my ex-mother-in-law who refused to serve corn. So, my sorry, not sorry is that we’re having corn.

    I came very close to an encounter at the checkout yesterday. The woman in front of me was being so rude to the cashier. I felt so bad. I came close to saying something, but I thought it would likely make matters worse. I did offer some comforting thoughts to the cashier and offered to be a witness if the woman complained.

    People…ugh.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. It’s not even Thanksgiving here and grocery stores are crazy. Maybe we have a lot of expats? My neighbour went to Costco yesterday; she left at 10am and got home just after ONE O’CLOCK. What even. I have to get groceries tomorrow and I’m dreading it.

    I have never, ever, ever liked the traditional turkey dinner, even back in the days when I did eat meat. I can’t think of a single thing I liked. My mom makes a great sweet potato dish that’s just slow-cooked sweet potatoes with olive oil and Mrs. Dash, I like that. I don’t like pie, I don’t like mashed potatoes…so I’m not a great person to ask!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Nicole, no kidding? That long at Costco? I know it’s a big store, but we’re usually able to get in and out quickly. Shoppers with a purpose, no one dawdling. Lots of checkout lanes.

      You and my mother would have gotten along perfectly. She disliked the whole Thanksgiving dinner menu, usually making herself a large tossed salad, then nibbling on the traditional fare. She was a great cook, and what she made was delicious, but it was NOT her favorite meal.

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  11. Shopping is a bear if you wait too long. I’m leaving now to get an extra bag of cranberries and maybe a few sweet potatoes. I LIKE Thanksgiving because it’s about grah-ti-tood, even though Christmas encroaches more and more on the November holiday. HAPPY THXgiving to you and Zen-Den! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marian, I wish you well on your shopping trip to the grocery. May the berries be fresh, the potatoes plentiful, and the people pleasant.

      I like the concept of gratitude/thanks, don’t get me wrong. But maybe we could do it in a more relaxed way? With less emphasis of traditional dinners, and more on having fun with loved ones. Outside of the kitchen.

      Happy Thanksgiving to you, too.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I like the food of Thanksgiving! My sweet potato casserole is mashed with butter and cinnamon with pecans on top – quite popular with the family. I make the whole feast gluten-free and dairy-free for my daughter who cannot tolerate gluten or dairy. My sister is making a lot of the dishes this year as it is her turn but we have it at my home because I have more room so it will be easier for me this year.
    I am just glad to be together with family.

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    • Ellen D, it sounds like you have this traditional dinner well in hand. I’m not a fan of sweet potatoes/yams on principle; they just seem wrong to me. I like savory food, I like sweet food, but not together in one vegetable on my plate. If that makes sense?

      It’s great you’ve found ways to make your feast gluten-free and dairy-free. Even 5 years ago that’d have been difficult. I get why everyone is coming to your house. Space is important, no need to feel crunched together.

      Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

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  13. I find one of my kids who is cooking something, and when asked “if I have plans” (which of course I never do) I am told to come eat and so I simply eat whatever they have fixed, smile and find myself grateful that I didn’t have to do anything and won’t have to contend with leftovers that I really don’t want anyway. Then on Friday I usually just have a salad 😉

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    • Deb, I LOVE THIS COMMENT. You’ve made me laugh out loud. Yours is a pragmatic approach to Thanksgiving and I applaud it. Here’s to no work, no leftovers– and a happy healthy vegetable-filled Friday.

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    • Curt, you make a good point. If’n you don’t like to cook, but you can do it intently for one day, then stretch out the leftovers for days after… is it worth it? Now I’m off to read your post.

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  14. Hi, Ally – Our Canadian Thanksgiving is in October. This year, we left the fuss, the muss and the grocery stores behind and celebrated as a group of ten friends (all fully vaccinated) at a local restaurant that was offering a very affordable Thanksgiving Dinner …. and very spaced out seating (we had a whole room to ourselves). That might just become our new Thanksgiving tradition.
    BTW – I’m a ‘yes’ to everything on your Thanksgiving Dinner List except for yams with marshmellows. The latter is a definite ‘no’ for me!
    Wishing you and Z-D a very Happy Thanksgiving!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Donna, I like the date of the Canadian Thanksgiving. It makes sense to me to have the celebration earlier in the fall. I love your idea of going out to eat on Thanksgiving and making that the tradition. We’ve done that and it can be relaxing IF the restaurant is able to accommodate crowds. In fact the best Thanksgiving dinner I’ve ever had was in the French cafe in the Paris Las Vegas Hotel & Casino. Go figure, huh?

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  15. Happy Thanksgiving, Ally! Or as we 🇨🇦 call it…just another Thursday in November 😁. Our Thanksgiving (October) is but a fleeting albeit delicious memory…sigh!

    Deb

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  16. Being Italian-American, turkey and white mashed potatoes and that brown stuff Anglos call ‘gravy’ is just not a part of our diet. We always had guests for Thanksgiving and indeed a turkey was made but usually never made it out of the kitchen to the dinner table. One year it never made it out of the freezer in time. I absolutely hate mashed potatoes or even white potatoes in any form but I love sweet potatoes/yams. Matter of fact we had mashed sweet potatoes yesterday – personally I like them just baked, well actually microwaved, with just some black pepper, eat them right out of the skin with a spoon but for my husband I mash them, add cinnamon, nutmeg, black pepper and butter. The whole marshmallow thing is a no. Yuck. Never had green bean casserole in my life.

    I am married to a Boston Irish guy so I will make a turkey breast and he gets his choice of mashed potatoes (Bob Evans) or stuffing (Stovetop) not both – too many carbs. I will have cranberry sauce (yup the stuff from a can, I like it – sue me.) I will make that brown gravy stuff – from scratch – (a roux, chicken bouillon, white wine, worcestershire sauce, it’s not bad, certainly not something I would eat on a regular basis or at all.) Once a year my husband gets ‘his’ food –

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    • Grace, I understand about how cooking a turkey can be a trial. I’ve had successes, I’ve had failures. Through it all I have remained indifferent to turkey. Should I never eat it again, I wouldn’t complain. I like chicken better.

      I try to like yams but to no avail. I can, and do, eat them plain, but to mess them up with marshmallows is a bridge too far for me. Now mashed potatoes, I like– but my mother was like you, she didn’t like white potatoes so we didn’t have them often.

      Your gravy recipe [concept?] sounds greats. I might toss some white wine into mine this year, although tossing white wine into the cook works well too. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • Um, why would cooking a turkey be a trial? My mother couldn’t do it, that’s true – she always overcooked it but I think that’s because it was an afterthought. I cooked a whole turkey once, just like roasting a whole chicken – it’s no big deal but I don’t want to eat it LOL

        Brown gravy recipe: 2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour – make a roux. Add: one cup of bouillon that is 3/4 cup of bouillon and 1/4 cup of white white wine, a couple of shots of worcestershire sauce. I have at times even added a shot of hot sauce, just for fun.

        I don’t get the marshmallow and sweet potato thing either…

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  17. To be honest, I eat sweet potatoes throughout the year.One of my favorite dishes is a sweet potato spinach sauté that uses coriander, cumin, and lemon. Very middle-eastern, and delicious.

    I got interrupted while reading because I suddenly thought, “Oy! There’s not going to be any whipping cream left!” So off I went. Sure enough, there were only quarts on the shelf, but I snagged one. Over the years, my Thanksgiving dinner has morphed a bit, but I still have to have the traditional favorites. Instead of roasting a whole turkey, though, it’s a smoked turkey breast or an apple stuffed pork loin. Cranberry sauce is a must have, but I make mine fresh now: ground raw cranberries, a ground orange, honey, and chopped pecans. Stuffing and gravy are must-haves, but I’ve gone southern and now make cornbread dressing. I always get a couple of quarts of good gravy from a local catering place. Add in some kind of veggie, and homemade yeast rolls, and you have a dinner.

    My one no-no is salad. No tossed salad or coleslaw belongs on a Thanksgiving table. Period.

    Dessert? (It has to be) homemade pecan pie, apple cake, and peach cobbler. I can’t wait!

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    • I’m laughing at the thought of you stopping mid-comment to go buy some whipping cream. I get that, it sells out quickly around here too, and I only eat homemade whipped cream– no Cool Whip for me. Ever.

      Your cranberry sauce recipe sounds very similar to my late aunt’s one. She made it every year. Our stuffing is southern/country-style, made with cornbread and biscuits. As for a salad, gotta take issue with that. I grew up with a mother who was obsessed with raw vegetables, so I think of a tossed salad as part of the traditional fare.

      I hope your Thanksgiving dinner is all you’re hoping for and that you enjoy it… gratefully. 😋

      Liked by 1 person

  18. I don’t like green bean casserole and brussels sprouts.
    I’ve been asked to make and bring my bread dressing…it’s super simple and sooo good, pumpkin pie which we’ll buy, and I’m making a chocolate cream pie. I’m looking forward to it. This is my favorite holiday.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Deborah, another vote against green bean casserole. So far it has proven to not be a commenter favorite. I’m surprised I figured I was in the minority about not liking it.

      I haven’t had chocolate cream pie in decades. What a throwback to my childhood. It sounds like you’ve got your favorite holiday well in hand. Happy Thanksgiving.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I thought that green bean casserole was popular too!

        This is going to be the first time I’ve ever made a chocolate cream pie. My mom makes the best one. Mine won’t be as good because I’m using a cookie crust and she always makes her pie crust and mine isn’t nearly as good as hers.

        I hope you have a lovely Thanksgiving.

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  19. One year my brother was tasked with bringing the pumpkin pies. He is an accomplished baker so it wasn’t outside of his skillset. Sadly (for us) his work schedule interfered. On the way to dinner he stopped to pick up pies but there was only mincemeat left. No one in the family eats mincemeat except for him (and I’m not sure he really likes it either). This happened 40 years ago but it’s one of our T-day stories. Mincemeat pie doesn’t appear in my house for T-day or any other day. I like sweet potatoes but not with marshmallows. I like mine mashed! Happy t-day. We are going to my 91 year old bro (kitchen still in construction) and there will be 4 of us. I’m bringing the pies (he he). We’ll see what I get.

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  20. You’re right about the grocery stores!! I went yesterday and it was nuts. Love turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and pie – really any kind of pie except Pecan – totally worthless. lol. Not a fan of cranberries or gravy either. Headed to a friends place this year – Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday 🙂

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  21. I’m not sure how bad curbside pick up will be this next month, but it’s got to be better than going in the stores. I am with you on the avoiding grocery stores thing!

    As for dinner, give me turkey, stuffing, cranberries (in fact I’m stocking up on cranberries to freeze since you can’t get them off season and I make mine with stevia or other sugar substitutes), creamed onions and plain sweet potatoes. No green bean casserole for me! I like squash as well but if I’m making sweet potatoes it just seems redundant.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Zazzy, we haven’t tried curbside pick-up in a while, but if the Covid-19 infections spike after Thanksgiving, as is predicted, we’ll go back to it.

      You’re right about cranberries. They used to be available for months, but now there’s about a 6 week window of opportunity. I haven’t had creamed onions is years. What a throwback to my childhood. My dad was a fan of them. I need to make those sometime this winter.

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  22. I remember the mania when I lived in Phoenix (a long time ago), and came to realise what an important holiday it is in the US.

    Our Thanksgiving is in October but much more low key. It’s always on a Monday and people may get together on Friday, Saturday, Sunday or Monday, depending on their family and/or configuration of friends. The best part is that it’s not in any way overtly religious (it can be made out that way, of course), so everyone gets a nice long weekend. While many people do eat turkey, it’s not at all unusual for people to have something else entirely. I didn’t grow up with turkey and really don’t care for it much.

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  23. I don’t like celebrating a food-centric holiday since being diagnosed with celiac disease in 2015. I am cooking this year for just the 8 of us, so I went to the trouble of making a favorite dessert, a GF version. I love mashed potatoes and Turkey and cranberry sauce. I make a sweet and sour green bean casserole that I can do GF which is a little bit of heaven. I will have plenty to eat but still miss the gluten options.

    My sorry not sorry is easy. My sister invited everyone to her house. My other sis said yes. I said we would take a pass. Just us. Not interested in my sister’s nonsense or my other sister’s enabling behavior. Sometimes it is toned down but one cannot be sure. After the year we’ve had, my patience is shot.

    Oh and Curly dances on Friday in Midwest championships. I’m glad to have it over Friday and not have to wait till Sunday which is usual. Regardless it is a long, stressful day and I will be tense until is over.

    Enjoy your non green bean or yam meal.

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    • Ernie, food-centric describes this holiday. Maybe that’s why people get so into making it perfect, as if that’s possible. Your sweet and sour green bean casserole sounds delicious as long as there aren’t any of those dried onions in it. Yuck

      It’s wise to avoid relatives who don’t have your best interests at heart. Do your own thing, let them stew in their own juices. You deserve a pleasant day, not struggling with your siblings.

      Good luck to Curly. Just think on Saturday morning you’ll have a weekend in front of you, with all the stress-y events behind you! Happy Thanksgiving.

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  24. There isn’t much I don’t like about the traditional Thanksgiving dinner. It’s always been my favorite day of the year. It’ll also be just two of us this year, but hey – leftovers are the best part of the experience!

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  25. I’m with you on the green bean casserole and the yams with marshmallows. I just like plain-Jane green beans and yams. Maybe with a little butter. We are celebrating Thanksgiving with our son, his wife, and some of her family in Oregon this year, so I am happy to accept a supporting role, rather than having to produce the entire dinner. Happy Turkey Day to you and Zen Den!!!

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    • Laurie, I like most vegetables plain-Jane-style. We’ll have green beans, just steamed not covered in saucy stuff. Lucky you to be in a supporting role, that’s the best place to be. Involved tangentially, offering moral support. You’ve got this! Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours. Enjoy!

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  26. It will be just my husband and me this year too and for the first time ever, we decided to buy a pre-packaged meal from Costco (turkey breast, mashed potatoes, stuffing, beans, and cranberry sauce). We will have to cook the turkey but it appears that the rest just needs to be heated. I will miss having the turkey carcass at the end to make soup from. Hubby also bought one of those GIANT pumpkin pies all for himself since I don’t care for pumpkin pie (I showed great restraint not purchasing a GIANT pecan pie for myself). Sorry not sorry: no yams with little marshmallows have crossed these lips and will never ever do so.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Janis, I’ll be interested in knowing your review of your Costco pre-packaged meal. We thought about something similar with Kroger, but decided against it… this year. Those pies are huge, btw. I can eat a couple bites of pumpkin pie, then be satisfied. Your husband is going to have a lot of pie on his plate, so to speak. 😳

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  27. I will be shopping today and then making a long car ride tomorrow. Grades are due and parent conferences are today (the reasons shopping didn’t happen this weekend), and what I’m really looking forward to is Saturday, when I will be back home with no work weighing on me.

    We don’t do turkey and I’m not sorry about that, no sorry to temper it. No one cooks it well and it’s not that great. We will have prime rib, but mashed potatoes will be the best part of the meal.

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    • Rita, I wish you well when you go shopping today. Maybe you’ll hit a magical time when there’ll be few shoppers! One can hope.

      I’m not a fan of turkey either but this year we’re going for it. I like prime rib. That’s a great choice instead of the bird. Most commenters have been on Team Mashed Potatoes. Funny about that!

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  28. Don’t like: spending hours preparing the big feast, eating it in 15 minutes, and then spending an hour or more on clean-up. Seems like an imbalance of energy expended vs. enjoyment.
    Do like: Turkey sandwiches for several days following the holiday. Thanks to my husband’s family, I know the best/only way to enjoy the leftovers: in between two slices of good bread–lightly spread with mayonnaise–put a layer of turkey, a layer of stuffing, and a layer of whole berry cranberry sauce. Makes the effort all worthwhile.

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    • Donna, I, too, question the time commitment versus the minutes spent eating. It’s an imbalance to be sure. And then there’s the clean-up, which depresses me to no end. However we’re giving it a go this year.

      I’ll try your husband’s family’s leftover turkey sandwich on Friday. It sounds better to me than the sit-down meal. Am I allowed to admit that?

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  29. I’m not sorry that Mom and I are dining alone and not going to my brother’s where there will be a large group of unvaccinated people. I’m sorry that some are so entrenched in their illogic that they can’t do anything for the common good. I love stuffing/dressing with turkey and gravy. I dislike candied sweet potatoes and mashed potatoes. I would eat green bean casserole but it’s not my favorite. I enjoy pumpkin pie but LOVE pecan pie.

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    • Margaret, you and your mother are wise to avoid that crowd. It defies reason that they want to get together and potentially spread the virus the rest of us are doing our best to fight.

      You know when I wrote this I forgot about pecan pie. I don’t remember ever having it at Thanksgiving, only at Christmas. Yet many commenters have talked about it as part of a Thanksgiving feast.

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  30. We will enjoy a vegetarian and mostly gluten free holiday at my sister’s with 2 nieces, a nephew-in-law, and our great-nephew (7 mos. old).

    On the menu ~ lasagne, mashed potatoes, GF stuffing, veggies (not sure which ones), and pie. Instead of making the dinner here and carting it (through the woods and over the river) to Orlando, I offered to bring appetizers . . . which will come in handy since our dinner will be later in the day since J, N, and Landon have another dinner to attend at 1:30.

    The appetizers will include crudités, hummus, chips, curry dip, cheese, crackers, and black olives. Because it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without black olives.

    HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO YOU AND Z-D!

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    • Nancy, I’m laughing about the black olives. You and Z-D are two peas in a pod on that point. I like all of your appetizers btw. Suddenly I’m craving curry dip.

      Your celebration sounds wonderful. I think of lasagne at Christmastime but not Thanksgiving, although there’s no reason it wouldn’t make a fine feast on Turkey Day. I’m sure all turkeys everywhere agree.

      Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours. Gobble on 😋

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  31. Agree with you about grocery shopping and the green bean casserole and yams with marshmallows. I would get by with just stuffing but my husband likes mashed potatoes so he makes those. Our 12 pound turkey is defrosting in the fridge and I’m crossing my fingers that our oven, which has been working sporadically lately, does not pick Thursday to take a break. Cranberry sauce, jellied or whole? I prefer jellied.

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    • Janet, we’re the opposite: Zen-Den wants stuffing, I want mashed potatoes– so we have both, obviously. Finger crossed about your oven, too. I like all things cranberry so it makes no difference to me if it’s jellied or whole. Just as long as it’s on the table.

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  32. It’s great that you are having a low-key holiday. This is the first year we will not have neighbors and friends with us. Everyone had somewhere to go or would be out of town. It is also unusual that our small family will be almost complete. Our son, daughter, and two grandsons will be here, and only the grandsons’ mother will be missing. She lives in NJ and doesn’t have vacation time. We are generally a convivial group and will enjoy being together. Happy Thanksgiving!

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    • Anne, your small family gathering sounds perfect. While big Thanksgiving feasts can be fun, low-key makes for a more relaxed atmosphere which I prefer. I look forward to your photos and stories about the day because I know you– and there will be photos and stories. Don’t try to tell my otherwise. Happy Turkey Day!

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      • We often had 30 people for Thanksgiving in NY. Those gatherings were relaxed, because we were in the fellowship hall at church. Four of us did most of the food. There were lots of toys that the children could play with in a long hall. We mingled and had a chance to visit with everyone. It was great while it lasted.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Crystal, I understand that many people love the fancied up yams, but I. just. can’t. for the reason you mention. Fortunately we can each make whatever we want to eat at our feast. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your husband.

      Liked by 1 person

  33. Thanksgiving was always our favorite holiday when I was young. My parents put together a very traditional Thanksgiving dinner. The table was opened as big as it could be and we had a big family gathering. We did not celebrate Christmas or Hanukkah so Thanksgiving was the day of love and gratitude. In 1970, my siblings and I gave up eating meat. That changed everything. My parents still made a turkey, but we made soybean burgers from scratch. Adventurous teens we were. I’m still not eating meat, so we’re having some yummy tofu dish with lots of veggies. Happy Thanksgiving!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Robin, you have lovely memories of your early Thanksgiving dinners. I can understand why Thanksgiving meant so much to you. You made soybean burgers from scratch? That’s creative, and rather healthy for teenagers. I like tofu and I like veggies so I could be quite happy with your planned feast. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

      Like

    • John, it’s difficult to know where the value is when it comes to turkey. I saw someone on Twitter posting about a $120.00 organic farm-raised 24 lbs turkey. I’m still tying to process that idea. O’Charley’s sounds like a great idea.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. Happy Thanksgiving Ally Bean! Glad you’re keeping it simple. December is around the corner – reminds me to order the ham (cooked and dressed) and salmon … we do cold foods for Christmas lunch, unlike many who do the whole shebang, roast this and that, many side dishes, hot Christmas pudding … makes no sense to me, since we’re in summer time – and the livin’ is easy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Susan, I’d enjoy Christmas more if I lived in a place where it is summertime. I’ve said that for years, and I agree that a cold luncheon on Christmas Day would be delicious. Of course I like low-key anything so I’m onboard with your idea. And with our simple Thanksgiving dinner for two.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Holidays meals should be what makes the folks eating it happy. 🙂 I love a good old turkey dinner, white meat only, no green bean casserole, and I can take the yams or leave them, marshmallows or not. I bought a fully cooked turkey breast, cleaned and sliced, and it’s in the freezer. My daughter was planning to have a KC BBQ meal and said we could get together in our garage with a window open and the heaters running. Done! The garage has been cleaned and vacuumed, and I’ll be working on BBQ beans, coleslaw, and deviled eggs. She’s bringing the large variety of meat ordered from KC, home-made rolls and dessert. My planned small turkey dinner will be eaten over the weekend. Life is good here, and it sounds like it is good at your house, just the way it should be. 🙂 I did the last of my errands this morning. I left the house at 7:45 a.m. and was back by 9:15 a.m. There weren’t many people at the grocery store at 7:45 and I self checked. Many of the stores around here are closing on Thanksgiving, and I say ‘it’s about time.’ Happy turkey day!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Judy, I like your change in plans. BBQ in the garage sounds wonderful and lots of fun. I agree that Thanksgiving dinner should be whatever you want it to be. We don’t always do the traditional one. You were wise to go to the grocery early. Obviously you beat the crowd. I’m not sure which stores around here are going to be open on Thanksgiving. I’m not much of a shopper so I haven’t been paying any attention, but it seems like they should be closed. Enjoy your Thursday feast– and then your weekend feast. Happy Thanksgiving.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. This year has been so tough on our family so we are trying to be super relaxed. Our big feast will be Saturday. I do the ham & turkey while my husband does sides and we will do desserts together. It’s go-woth-the-flow this year.

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    • Jan, I’ve never had oyster stuffing but when I was a kid as the first course on Thanksgiving we had oyster stew [that was really a cream soup]. I liked it, but have never made it. Happy Thanksgiving to you, too.

      Like

  37. This is the first year in a long, long, long time (the more I think about it, maybe ever) that it will just be the two of us for Thanksgiving. And it’s going to be weird. The Husband will make something – but I don’t think he’ll be making the traditional dinner.

    And we must be soul sisters – because I agree green bean casserole and yams (with or without marshmallows) are disgusting. I knew I liked you for a reason! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Gigi, I bet you’ll get over the weirdness and enjoy your day together. I’ll tell you one thing, it’ll be much calmer than with other people around. We don’t always make a traditional turkey dinner, but this year we decided to go for it. As for being my soul sister, YES! I just cannot deal with those two side dishes.

      Liked by 1 person

  38. I’ve posted in the past howThanksgiving is my least favorite holiday. We have hosted for 15 years or so and there’s nothing like making a big meal of food you hate for a house full of relatives . . . I dislike turkey and mashed potatoes. I find it to be a carb fest, but I do like sweet potatoes made any way (even marshmallowed!) I do 3 shopping trips, the last being tomorrow to pick up a fresh turkey (we also do a separate breast). I make everything homemade except the rolls. It’s quite the production, but my husband loves it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bijoux, I’m not crazy about the traditional Thanksgiving dinner. I’m not a fan of turkey. I admire you for making the dinner, especially from scratch. It’s a lot of work and you’re right it’s all about the carbs. It’s been a long time since I spent Thanksgiving with relatives so I can only imagine how that’d be now with talk of politics and vaccination status. Maybe next year you could plan a vacation to Tahiti in late November. Avoid the whole thing. 😉

      Like

  39. I don’t like my father-in-law’s chestnut stuffing 🤮, nor did I ever much care for my Dad’s wife potato/bread stuffing…they have to be separate to be enjoyed. I love my mother-in-law’s cranberry relish and my wife’s baked goods. I also just love being with family. I miss my parents, they’re both gone (I never had much of a relationship with my dad’s second wife after my mom died), I really miss my Mom’s bread stuffing…it was a highlight growing up. My in-laws don’t care for turkey so it’s my second ham Thanksgiving.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. We Canadians celebrated our Thanksgiving a month ago but happy Thanksgiving you y’all! 😊🍗

    I don’t love turkey actually… Sorry not sorry lol

    And I don’t like any dried fruits or seeds or nuts in my stuffing 😑🙄

    I love any type of roast Veggies and all the wine and bread 😍🥖🍷🍞

    Liked by 1 person

    • bosssybabe, truthfully I’m not a fan of turkey either. I can eat it, but prefer chicken. Stuffing is idiosyncratic because everyone makes it differently. I can deal with nuts, if I have to, but no seeds or dried fruit, please. I’d be happy with roasted veggies, bread, and wine, maybe with a piece of pie for dessert. I get that.

      Liked by 1 person

  41. Pingback: Green Bean Casserole Guarantees a Super Bowl – Swinged Cat

  42. Odd man out here. I LOVE the meal! Of course ours was a month ago and I am super happy to repeat it again at Christmas time.
    We do a HUGE home raised turkey, bread stuffing, massive amounts of whipped potatoes, gravy from scratch (my son usually makes it while my daughter doctors the potatoes), cranberry chutney (spicy!), Peas and carrots (mixed for my son in law and he often peels the carrots), apple salad– just apples and whipping cream – think it’s a poor farm version of Waldorf), an Asian take on sweet potatoes and parsnips), buns (my cousin makes) and pumpkin plus another pie. Yep the whole meal deal. Sorry not sorry!! And leftovers – bread, turkey, stuffing,gravy , chutney, bread sandwich. I walk a LOT during these days to ensure I can still move!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • BernieLynne, your menu sounds varied and plentiful and well-planned. I know that many people love a traditional Thanksgiving dinner and really do it up, enjoying every bite. I have nothing against the idea, of course– just not my thing. I can understand why you walk so much after your meal. I’m fascinated with your poor farm version of Waldorf salad. That’s new to me. I grew up on Waldorf salad, it was one of my mother’s favorites and showed up on the table often.

      Like

  43. I agree about staying away from the stores if at all possible (also on the weekend.) Not sorry that we don’t do turkey. My family never did when I was growing up and since we got married we haven’t either. This year we’re having ham and mashed sweet potatoes with bacon and maple syrup (a bit, not too much), the latter a new recipe which I hope will turn out well. But bacon! I’m not big on cooked green beans (unless they’re roasted) or the sweet potatoes with marshmallows. We’ve often had homemade ravioli for the major holidays but since my parents and brother and family are going to be here and we have several picky eaters, we’re going more traditional. Happy Thanksgiving!

    janet

    P.S. My s-i-l is bringing a pumpkin pie but I’m doing a fresh fruit pizza (not cooked, of course.)

    Like

    • Janet, growing up we sometimes had turkey, sometimes didn’t. One year we had tuna cakes, cuz that was affordable. I can be happy with any meal on Thanksgiving so your ham sounds delicious to me. I hope your new recipe is a hit. I’d love homemade ravioli but get why you chose the menu you did. I love the idea of a fresh fruit pizza as a dessert option. I haven’t had that in years and always liked it. You’ve given me an idea…

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  44. So far so good. We’re having Thanksgiving at my house this year. I have a 20 lb. turkey in the fridge. The table is all set for 9, and I have the gravy half made. My guests are taking care of most of the rest of it. I made general suggestions and I left the rest up to them. I was especially please about the grandchildren. My granddaughter is bringing the dressing. Her fiance is bringing roasted veggies. And my grandson is bringing a sweet potato dish of his choosing. He’s become quite an accomplished cook, so I’m expecting something unique.

    Big surprise: No crowd at the supermarket when I was there on Monday.

    My worst Thanksgiving involved a snowstorm and a rather long trip to another city. I hate that sort of thing. When we lived abroad, we skipped Thanksgiving or had a chicken.

    Like

    • Nicki, you have it going on. Well planned, my dear. I like how you’ve given suggestions but not demands about what everyone is to bring. A much more relaxed approach that I am all for. I’m intrigued about the sweet potato dish. Wonder what that kid will come up with?

      No crowds at the grocery? I’m amazed, but pleased for you.

      I understand about the travel in snowstorms. We used to drive all over the state so that we could celebrate Thanksgiving with family that was scattered hither and yon. It was stressful, and in retrospect I realize not much fun. But we thought we had to do it, so we did.

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  45. Happy thanksgiving, Ally! And Happy Thanksgiving Eve. It seems like those pilgrims should have spaced out Thanksgiving and Christmas a bit more throughout the year in terms of shopping load! Lol. But what do I know, we don’t have any such fun rituals like that down under. I have to ask though… yams and marshmallows? Why and what is it?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Amanda, I agree. I’d like Thanksgiving better if it weren’t in late November. In Canada it’s in October and that makes more sense. You don’t have a national holiday based on gratitude? Interesting.

      This is a recipe for Candied Yams and Marshmallows. I’ve no idea how it came to be associated with Thanksgiving. To my knowledge the pilgrims didn’t bring marshmallows with them to the new world.

      Like

  46. I stay far away from grocery stores this week, too. We’re getting turkey dinner take-out again this year, which includes and eliminates the same things as yours. 😉 I don’t like home-made cranberry sauce. My sister doesn’t like turkey. She ordered clam chowder from the same market. Thanksgiving isn’t what it used to be, for us, anyway, but that’s okay with me. I’m grateful for the family I have left and for not having a huge mess to clean up!

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  47. I love most traditional Thanksgiving foods. Give me all the turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, pie… I’ll pass on the cranberry sauce and the yams with marshmallows! Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Christie, you’re a true Thanksgiving aficionado, an easy guest at a dinner. I’m with you about the yams with marshmallows, obviously. I don’t know when they became a thing, but not having them is better than having them, imho. Happy Thanksgiving!

      Like

  48. We don’t celebrate Thanksgiving on this side of the pond, so we generally have the big turkey shenanigans only at Christmas. My mother did try to introduce the green bean casserole after a visit to my sister in the US – I did not receive it well. Yams & marshmallows sounds yucky too. Stuffing, however, is an art form and I’ve always based mine on one in my mother’s old Joy of Cooking book – so it’s US rather than UK style, somewhat like my gravy is. We are expecting a Turkey shortage over here – due to Brexit or COVID or both – but I’m loving ham, so am totally chilled about it. Himself likes to do something sneaky and Scandinavian with fish for Christmas – sometimes a hit, sometimes not so much. Let’s see what this year brings. Till then, Happy Thanksgiving for tomorrow Ally & Z-D 🙂

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  49. It’s just Joe and me this Thanksgiving again, too. The girls are too far away. I’m trying to keep it simple. We agreed to have Cornish hens instead of turkey but I discovered that Joe had smuggled in a huge turkey and hidden it in a cooler in the garage! WTH! “I couldn’t help it.” he said. “It was 49 cents a pound.”

    Like

    • Anna, ha! A great story. God save us all from our frugality ways. I haven’t had Cornish game hens since I was a kid. Whichever bird you roast, I hope you enjoy it. Happy Thanksgiving!

      Like

  50. Happy Thanksgiving-to-be, Ally Bean. Your sorry not sorry sounds good to me. My hubby and I will have turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy. Those are all HIS favorite things. I am making something with brussels and dried cranberries, not sure what yet. That will be MY favorite part. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kathy, we’re making a traditional meal this year for the first time in a long while. I’m not a fan of it, but Z-D likes it and also likes to cook so it’ll be fun for us. Brussels sprouts with dried cranberries sounds intriguing. Enjoy! And Happy Thanksgiving to you, too.

      Liked by 1 person

  51. Yeah, I’m with you on skipping the green bean casserole and yam/sweet potato ‘pie’ a la marshmallow. Not a turnip fan either. Because it was just the two of us as well, we opted for our turkey dinner last Sunday. Why not? Who says it has to be on a Thursday? 😉 We opted for squash, stuffing and roasted brussels sprouts to go with the turkey and gravy (a MUST). Saying no to mashed potatoes was hard, but even with the above menu, we felt stuffed. I love the leftovers, which we are enjoying. My son told me that many Americans throw out the uneaten food. WHAT??? The leftovers are the best part! I don’t cook for a week! 😀
    However, I will wait on putting up the Christmas decorations at least until the weekend. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Eliza, I haven’t had turnips in years, maybe decades. I never much liked them either. I like your early Thanksgiving dinner approach. Your meal, even if it lacked mashed potatoes, sounds delicious. Interesting about Americans throwing out leftovers. I didn’t come from a family that did that, nor did my husband. As for the rest of my fellow citizens, who knows? 🤷‍♀️

      Liked by 1 person

  52. My mom and I just had a turkey breast and the trimmings which were just cooked in separate pots, nothing fancy. For the longest time since I’ve been alone (2010), I bought some Oscar Carving Board turkey pieces (already cooked) and threw them into a saucepan of green bean casserole fixin’s and made a side order of Stove Top stuffing. It wasn’t the most traditional meal, but got it done. Now since I put a crockpot, I’ll put a similar mixture into the crockpot … I put a box of Stove Top stuffing onto the bottom and layer in the veggies and chicken and a liberal sprinkling (oh heck … the large-sized box of Durkee onion rings) on top. I’ve never had yams and don’t have any urge to try them. My mom did the baked squash with mini marshmallows (not a fan) or turnip (not rutabagas, but the big waxy vegetable a/k/a turnip), also not a favorite of mine. I operate on the KISS method of meal prep. I got some holiday cookies to have and had a bad day at work and ate them last week. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda, I like your crockpot approach to making your Thanksgiving Day meal. You’ve got the flavors of it, and found a way to make it ezpz on yourself. We don’t always make the traditional feast so this year will be special in that way. Laughing about your now long gone cookies. I get that. In fact that’s why I picked up the pies yesterday, to avoid any temptation to eat them beforehand. Happy Thanksgiving!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I just got the crock pot last year and like it. I follow a blogger “In Diane’s Kitchen” and she features easy recipes every day. Her crockpot meals inspired me to get a crockpot. It looks a little different than a traditional Thanksgiving meal, but tastes great. Yes, now I’ll have nothing no treat to have with the egg nog. Baked goods with tantalizing smells are hard to resist. Happy Thanksgiving Ally!

        Liked by 1 person

  53. My thanksgiving menu sounds like yours Ally, other than we add squash and mushy peas. I also made a one crust apple pie this year. I got talked into buying a Butterball whole turkey this year instead of my usual turkey breast, and what a greasy mistake that was. It’s been decades since I’ve had a Butterball, but that was when we used to have the big family dos with all the siblings. I always thought butterballs were good but this was a small ten pound one with hardly any white meat on it, just a pile of greasy bones, we barely got any leftovers out of it. so that was disappointing. We have our Canadian thanksgiving in October so reading about yours make me crave turkey again. I don’t go near the stores this time of year, even though the Black Friday sales aren’t as popular here, it’s still a zoo with all the monkeys on the loose!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni, I haven’t had a Butterball whole turkey in years. Like you I remember them as being delicious with plenty of leftovers. What a bummer that you had a lousy experience with one. I can’t stand greasy meat.

      I’ll avoid all stores as much as possible until January. I’m not a shopper to begin with, and once the stores become zoos, I’m happy to stay home and order online. Plus I want my booster vaccine, scheduled for mid-December, before I get around people again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I like to shop, but just can’t stand the crowds, esp the weekends, so I might try a Monday or Tuesday to finish up the Christmas shopping, but I’m still leery of Covid too. At least you can get your booster – we are behind again, my mother has hers scheduled for mid-Dec, but there is no sign of boosters for anyone younger than 70.

        Liked by 1 person

        • They opened up the age restrictions here last week. Everyone can get one now so we immediately went online to schedule ours. The soonest appointment was mid-December. Hope you’re able to get yours soon– or at least soon-ish.

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  54. My “tradition” has changed over the years, having grown up with turkey, stuffing, potatoes, squash & gravy plus all the pies and cookies and oh-so-healty others you could even imagine. Do I miss all that? Sure, occasionally. Thankfully, and for my aging health, my wife has taught me that less is better, and now, after much weight loss and feeling better than I did decades ago we’ll be enjoying a small rotisserie bird, my homemade stuffing, fresh Brussels Sprouts and fresh green beans, and finishing with my wife’s tantalizing homemade apple pie. Happy Thanksgiving to you.

    Like

    • presstfortime, your Thanksgiving dinner is well-planned and sounds like it’ll be perfect. I like all that you’re having. It is a healthy approach to the meal, different to the one of your childhood to be sure. For some reason this year we’re doing it up for the two of us. On the one hand why not? But on the other hand, why? Still it’ll be fun– as I hope your day is. Happy Thanksgiving!

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  55. For the past decade, we’ve celebrated Thanksgiving gathered at a close friend’s home – she grew up in the US and always cooked a turkey for our potluck get-together. The rest of the motley crew who gathered are mostly Asians who grew up in Asia, some who went to the US for school. So we brought a mish-mash of dishes to eat with the turkey; never green bean casserole nor yams with marshmallows (which I actually love – sorry!) though.

    This group hasn’t met for Thanksgiving for a couple of years already – last couple of years we tried to Zoom from our homes to at least touch base & share what we were thankful for. This year, our Hostess is back in the US to celebrate with her family there after not seeing them for a very long time.

    So, it has been a bittersweet remembrance as we give thanks virtually with our family & friends around the world.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ju-Lyn, it’s fun knowing that you and your friends have celebrated our Thanksgiving where you are. That’s cool, but I can understand how the tradition has changed these last few years. Everything has.

      As for yams with marshmallows, I understand in my brain why they’re supposed to taste good, but to me they’re too sweet. I like savory, I like sweet– but not on the same plate at the same time. Still you have at ’em. All you want!

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  56. Pingback: With roux your gravy is made… – Just Tawkin'

  57. I love traditional thanksgiving food (except for the cranberry sauce, which my mom used to prepare by opening a can of it and dumping it in a dish). Every year, I look forward to Thanksgiving, but once the day arrives, it does seem like a lot of work for a quick meal. Probably because I usually host! I firmly believe that most of the people who say Thanksgiving is their favorite holiday probably don’t actually cook the meal and have lots of people over, but I could be wrong.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ann, ha! So true. You make an excellent point about those who haven’t made and hosted Thanksgiving. I’m inclined to agree with you. Making a traditional Thanksgiving meal requires planning and a lot of pots + pans + serving dishes, and work, work, work. Plus you have to have somewhere to put all the people once the meal is made. It’s an event and those just don’t happen without effort.

      Liked by 1 person

  58. Hi Ally, I love green bean casserole. For the last twenty-six years, we have usually had Thanksgiving at our house, my best friend’s house, or my husband’s brother’s house. This year his sister had us for Thanksgiving this year and wanted to do it all.

    She planned for weeks. When we talked about it on the phone, I reminded her each time we chatted that there would only be three of us and that I wasn’t eating sugar. Her menu included the green beans mentioned before, yams, but I convinced her to leave out the marshmallows and brown sugar, and forget the mashed potatoes. We finished with turkey breast, gravy, a Hawaiian roll for each of the three of us with one left over, some cranberry sauce, and water to drink. I brought sugar-free orange jello and Cool-Whip to mix with her cottage cheese and mandarin oranges, and we skipped another bag of marshmallows. She bought her brother one piece of cake for his birthday and they split it into four parts and the two of them ate three of them. She also bought one piece of pumpkin pie and they split it into two parts.

    As we left, I tried to leave the leftovers at her house, because I knew what would happen to my almost-perfect diet. She insisted that we take some home, so we repeated most of the meal at dinner and loved every bite. It was a glorious Thanksgiving, and I was very grateful for the stress-free holiday.

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    • Marsha, I know that many [most?] people love the green bean casserole. I figure that by me not eating it at a meal, there’s more for everyone else. I’ve no moral objections to it, I just don’t like the taste of those burnt canned onions.

      Your Thanksgiving dinner sounds like it was perfect for the small group. You had a meal that accommodated each of you as much as possible– and was marshmallow-free. While I am all about a s’more in the summer, I find marshmallows weird at Thanksgiving in November. Call me fussy!

      I like one meal of leftovers after a traditional Thanksgiving dinner. I’m glad you got one, and no more from your celebration. I’m with you on being grateful for a stress-free holiday.

      Liked by 1 person

  59. Once again, late to the party, but I so love and appreciate your tree pics. I notice your take on green bean casserole. You must be one of the people Swinged Cat mentioned seeing disliking the stuff. I like it, but I didn’t make it, so can I stay friends with both of you still? 🙂 I hope you had a nice day. Our family ate ham! 😛

    Liked by 1 person

  60. We are fortunate in that Thanksgiving dinner is a team effort. There are 4 households coming together, so no one person has to make all that much. I make my contributions the day before, except for fruit salad that I make day of. Like you, I try to avoid grocery stores on the day or two before, though I did have a few SMALL things to get on Tuesday. Like rolls, since I don’t make my own.

    I am also a big no on green bean casserole or candied yams with marshmallows. I do make a sweet potato pudding that my family loves, though as I don’t care for sweet potatoes, so it’s not really anything I care about. I love green beans, but have only had the casserole once, and I could not imagine what all of the fuss was about. Not my thing. Green beans, lightly steamed, then sauteed in butter with some sliced almonds I could get behind. Or tossed with Gorgonzola cheese and toasted walnuts. Yum. Heck, even plain. Just not overcooked and put in a casserole. Maybe the one I had was a bad one?

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