9 Links For People Who Like Wordplay

… because information is FUN dammit.

Dear me, am I seeing a photo of a deer? Aye, it is a deer, my dear. Is the deer near here? No, from what I hear, the deer is not near here, my dear. 😁

 • • •

Need a laugh? Enjoy a generic millennial ad here.

But I don’t want to not say this word when I apologize.

Did you know that grok, like Jabberwocky, are examples of nonce words?

Miss Phryne Fisher’s 1920s Australian slang is here to help you increase your vocabulary.

There used to be more to the alphabet.

If you write headlines, how good are they? Find out here. [link revised 9/22]

The Oxford comma has an online dating profile that you can view here.

Looking for some petty phrases to use in your work emails? Click here.

According to this, your craft beer name is your grandfather’s job + a word you don’t fully understand.  My craft beer is: Salesman’s Milieu.

Published by

Ally Bean

Observant. Creative. Humorous. Adaptable. Happy enough. Looking for the crumb of truth in the cookie of life.

43 thoughts on “9 Links For People Who Like Wordplay”

  1. Do you know that if something is ‘sick’ it means it’s great, fantabulous etc … what are some of the others I’ve come across … ‘lit AF’ – I think it’s rather rude but thankfully I’ve forgotten. Will check those links anon, thanks AB

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    1. Susan, I didn’t know that “sick” meant great. I’ll keep that in mind now. Thanks for the info.

      “AF” after anything means “as f-bomb.” [Considering this is a PG-13 blog I will not write the actual word, but I’m sure you get the gist of what I’m saying.]

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  2. Love the Oxford comma link. Too funny. If anyone makes me give up my Oxford comma, I’ll huff and puff and blow down their punctuation house, and if I have to apologize for it, I’ll use the word ‘but.’ 😉

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    1. Carrie, you and me both. I love the Oxford comma, and while all my college English profs tried to stop me from using it, they did not succeed. Of course, thinking back on it, I may have gotten more B+ grades because of it. Oh well…

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Oh, this was a contentious topic in the English Department. I came from a small town high school where I was taught to use the Oxford comma, but among the college PhDs such an idea was antiquated. Forget clarity, get modern, they said. 🙄

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    1. Anne, I keep files of links that I might need for some reason, and every once in a while, like today, I post them here on my blog. No obligation to click on a link, but some are entertaining/informative as heck.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Yours was the first email I opened this morning, but seeing as how it has all these links and you know I love me some wordplay, I had to save you for after breakfast, doors, lunch, dog, and laundry. And I’m so happy I did!
    LOVED the millennial video! Such a hoot, I shared that sucker!
    Saw the original tweets on office emails, my fave is definitely “Pursuant to my last email… ”
    I think I may have a crush on Oxford. I’m hoping we can get together later, cause I, too, am down with cheese.
    Headline thingy wanted my email, which is shady af, although not as shady as Oxford.
    The Australian slang was lit, some of it known, some of it renamed, some of it worse than a but in an apology.
    Nonce words are my life, and fill my home.
    NOW, the thing I was most disappointed in? The old alphabet. Have you ever read some Gaelic, Welsh, Irish, old Blighty kinda stuff and been like, Why are there all the extra letters? I must admit, I am annoyed but intrigued and should have taken more linguistics.
    TOTES FAB POST! Would recommend A+++ You’re a thought leader, Ally Bean!

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    1. joey, I’m so pleased that you liked this bunch of links. The millennial video made my day when I saw it. Team Oxford is getting stronger with each comment here. The Australian slang tickled me, as did the obviousness of not saying “but” when you apologize.

      In college I had to memorize the beginning of Canterbury Tales in Old English. Welsh is foreign to me, although my mother and her sisters knew some of it because of ancestry. My guess about the extra letters in words is that they have something to do with Latin and printing presses, but that’s entirely a guess. If I ever knew for sure, that piece of info is long gone from my brain.

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  4. I’ve read several of Harriet Lerner’s works so I recognize exactly your resistance to dropping the ‘but’ word. I’ve tried it and just about strangled on my words. It’s a powerful and appropriate way to acknowledge my role in the dynamic, but good grief I hate to admit that!

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      1. Exactly – Not saying “but” takes the conversation in an entirely different direction. Like the transmission shifting from drive to reverse, with all the associated grinding of the gears.

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  5. I love me some wordplay! Fully on Team Oxford too. I didn’t know that “grok” was a nonce, but it’s one of my favorite words (although I don’t get to use it as often as I’d like to). That generic millennial ad was spot on… don’t they all look like that, doing their millennial stuff? 🙂

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    1. Janis, I’ve been pleasantly surprised by how many of my readers are on Team Oxford. I rarely use “grok” which suggests to me that I need to re-think my life. It’s a good word. The millennial ad was funny. It made me realize how consistent they seem to be. Were Boomers like that, too?

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  6. Sooooo funny!
    Showing my age (and lack of coolness), I had to Google BRB.
    Sad thing is, Google told me it meant ‘Bham Royal Ballet’.
    Bad Google. And I need to get a life — I know!

    Liked by 1 person

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