Know What I Mean, Ally Bean? 4 Things I Say Because I Am Me

This is funny, I say wisely

Let the flapdoodle & twaddle begin…

I don’t know if other people do what I’m going to tell you I do, but what I do is so ingrained in me that I don’t think about it unless I intentionally decide to write a blog post about it.

[Nice sentence, huh?]

I compiled the following of that which is ingrained in me by paying more attention to myself than I normally do, which is to say tuning in to who I am when I’m on auto-pilot.

So here’s what I’m getting at: I have specific things I say to myself when prompted by certain situations.  These things are not profound, but they are an indication of who I am when left to my own devices.

Allow me to explain below.

1

I am a magnet for good.

Years ago I read an article about how you should have a mantra you say whenever you go out into the world.  This mantra should empower you AND tell the Universe how to treat you.

There was a list of mantras and I picked this one, primarily because I like literal images I can envision in my pragmatic brain that also have a figurative component that makes my English Lit major heart happy.

2

Learn something!

I say this out loud whenever I see a school bus filled with kids drive by the house.  Those little trapped faces stare out at me and I feel for them, thus I bless them with what I believe is a good idea.

3

I park in “H” for hell.

There’s a story behind this one.  You see, whenever I go to any big box retail store that has a huge parking lot wherein rows are designated with letters of the alphabet I do one particular thing.

I cannot take credit for dreaming up this idea.  My mother and her friends did this.  Naturally she encouraged me to do the same thing.

Thus being a dutiful daughter I picked a letter, “H” for hell, and always park as close to it as I can.  Mom approved, although she rolled her school teacher-y eyes at me concerning the why of the letter I picked.

4

Tres bien

I say this in the morning as I pour my first cup of coffee into a mug.  It’s a blessing and a goal and a hope all in one phrase.  I will admit, however, that sometimes I say “muy bueno” or “very good” which impart the same meaning, just in different languages because variety is important.

QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

Do you, like me, consistently say things to yourself in certain situations that if overheard might make someone wonder about you?

If so, care to share what you say?

If you were forced to decide, do you think this post is more flapdoodle-y OR twaddle-ish? 

212 thoughts on “Know What I Mean, Ally Bean? 4 Things I Say Because I Am Me

    • Paula, ha! I try to not say my things out loud, but I do sometimes too. I had a boss who’d walk around chanting “it just doesn’t matter, it just doesn’t matter” and was surprised when we told her we heard her.

      Liked by 3 people

  1. Flapdoodle-y all the way…I love these…especially the park in the “H” section of a lot. Fab and funny! I also love the self-talk/mantras, generally. I don’t know why, but when I’m frustrated with the dog – when she’s being too pokey when it’s time to go outside (especially when it’s ‘her dime’ and I know she wants to go) I toss French phrases at her, urging her to “Allez”. It’s fine when no one’s around, but my sweet disabled sister? She asked, honestly once, “Does Sadie speak French?”. Oy. 😉

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    • Victoria, got it, one vote for flapdoodle. HA! I’m laughing out loud here. Oddly enough you speaking French to your dog makes good sense to me. Who’s to say that your dog isn’t bilingual? I mean, my parents spoke French phrases to me when I was child, knowing perfectly well that I might not understand them. Love your sister

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  2. I like your parking technique. Usually I park somewhere, then struggle to remember the number or letter closest! My most popular phrase to myself is “Boy, that was dumb.” It doesn’t necessarily mean something I’ve done. It could be anyone because someone is always doing something dumb. When I want to ooze self-confidence I ask, “what would Gracie do?” She is my most self assured cat. While I don’t pull out a leg to lick in stressful situations (yes, she does that to ‘break’ the tension), she has a canny knack of knowing how to pick her battles and for 8 lbs. she commands a lot of respect.

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    • Kate, these are wonderful things to say to yourself. I might adopt your “Boy, that was dumb” one because it is APPLICABLE IN SO MANY SITUATIONS. I adore that you use your cat’s personality as your gage for what to do. Gracie is 8 lbs of furry inspiration.

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  3. Flapdoodle it is! Parking lots where I live are never big enough to have letters! I look at the building when I park to see what my car is lined up with – the door, the store name, the bike rack. I tend to make observations out loud. “Look at that sunset!” which people understand and nod in agreement. But it’s things like full blown multi-person conversations that play in my head I do not share. I see a situation and I immediately start writing it in my head. If I blurted them out, some might think me daft!

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  4. While trying to think of phrases I say, I initially thought of those I DON’T say (not a fan of “It is what it is”). My running mantra is “Enjoy the mile you’re in”. Does that count?

    I consider this post a delightful blend of twaddle and flapdoodle, with maybe a hint of balderdash thrown into the mix. Enjoyable, as always!

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  5. For so many reasons I love this post. Opening wisdom quote – priceless and I hope my mind can retain it for use in the proper scenario. And I guess if I did say this out loud it perhaps would provoke stares, right? I am impressed you have four, not one, ‘mantras’. I like them all equally but the children’s faces peeking out at you and your sage and simple advice pulls at me. So very happy to read your post first thing this morning…while sipping coffee.

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  6. I like your self-talk. I have a few pithy mantras to pull out when occasion demands:

    Hang in there.
    This too shall pass.
    Keep breathing.
    Peace.
    Let it go.
    Thanks!
    Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.
    You gotta laugh.
    They know not what they do.
    This is AWESOME.
    YUM!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Nancy, I like all of your self-talk sayings. They seem to cover a variety of contingencies. I rather like putting two of them together into one useful sentence: “You gotta laugh, they know not what they do.” Bet I could say that daily… 🤔

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  7. I’ll go with flapdoodle…. I often talk to myself, but it’s more that I think of a way to phrase something and I say it aloud to size it up…I live in nyc though so I’m guessing no one notices/cares

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    • LA, duly noted, flapdoodle it is. I talk out loud to myself at home for the same reason that you do, I’m trying to phrase something. I don’t do that out in the world though. I’m too focused on being a [fricking] magnet of good! 😉

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    • Mthobisi Magagula, another vote for flapdoodle. I’m keeping a tally, of course. I know that my repetitive use of the same sayings might be odd. I feel like I’m keeping myself centered, so I keep on keeping on with them.

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  8. I agreed with none of his rulings, but when confronted with the ludicrous, I will often paraphrase Antonin Scalia, muttering, “Argle-bargle! Pure applesauce!”

    Great parking technique. I don’t often park in places that have letters to help you remember, unfortunately. But that’s exactly how I feel about going to places that are so big and crowded that parking areas are labeled.

    I think old fashioned sayings and rhymes tend to show up in my speech…and sometimes I learn they have racist roots and then I have to expunge them from my vocabulary. But I’ll usually ask my kid, “Ready, spaghetti?” And when he’s got a big backpack and other gear, I have been known to say, “You’re loaded for bear.”

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  9. Your phrases are more impressive than mine. The first phrase could even be inspiring! So not nonsense at all!
    The first phrase I thought of that I often say to myself is: “no one’s looking at you!” Which means I can wear what I want, cut my own hair, not bother with makeup or jewelry anymore… Sounds a bit pathetic when I type it out, but it is rather freeing. Now that I am retired, divorced, and old, I don’t have to care what others think. 🙂

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  10. Ha! That Yoda “quote” is hilarious.

    While I can’t weigh in on flapdoodle vs. twaddle (although they are both excellent words) I do think that your H for Hell idea is super smart. I will try to remember to put it to use next time I have to park in a garage.

    I don’t think I have little phrases that I say to myself, but my parents certainly had a lot of things that they said to me, and so I hear their voices on occasion. (It is better to talk to yourself or hear voices? Hmm.) And I also have things I tell my daughter, like, “You can do hard things.”

    My parents’ sayings include, “You can hold your breath that long” for situations that are tough but temporary and “There will be a beneficial outcome” for situations that seem really complex and anxiety-producing, but over which you have no real control.

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    • Suzanne, I couldn’t stop laughing when I found that Yoda image. I mean, soooo polite yet true.

      The parking plan only works with letters. I’m good with colors, too, always preferring blue when I can make it happen. BUT in parking lots or garages with numbers and directions, I’m lost. 4SE? Where is that, it tells me nothing? I majored in English not Geography.

      My parents had little sayings, too. Most were nonsensical or cautionary, more than encouraging. I like the idea of telling a child that “you can do hard things.” I also like what your parents programmed into you. Sound advice that works in adulthood, too.

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  11. My vote is just narrowly for twaddle, but only because it was feeling left out.
    I have lots of little phrases I say, (like, “Oh, get over yourself Dorothy) but mostly I have long conversations with myself that keep me on track when I’m in the middle of something. My husband is used to it, and just tells me to let him know if he needs to respond.

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  12. I have been known to use the phrase “well crap on a cracker” during times when my believed superior efforts to fix something really are useless. I may have others as well, but as you note Ally Bean, they are likely so ingrained I take no notice of them. Perhaps I should listen more closely to myself…

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  13. Oh Ally. I love all these things so much. I just know that we would be such good friends if we lived closer (I mean, we ARE good friends, but you know what I mean, I’d be stopping by with wine and cookies all the time). I just love your sentiments so much.
    One thing I always think of when I’m outside is from Hamilton “look around, look around, how lucky we are to be alive right now.” I just love that line and I hum it to myself often.
    If I see someone on the street who seems to be struggling, or someone cuts me off in traffic or otherwise seems to be…off, I think Be Well.
    I also say lines from Desiderata frequently to myself, like if it’s chaotic I think “go placidly amidst the noise and haste,” or “you are a child of the universe.”
    I recently heard a podcast that featured Val Monroe, former beauty editor of O magazine, and she talked about Mirror Meditation, which is when you look at yourself in the mirror, crinkle your eyes and soften like you are looking at someone you love, and say “Hi sweetie.” I do this all the time now when I look in the mirror. It is incredibly mood-boosting.

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    • Nicole, I am sorry that we live so far apart geographically, but like you I feel close emotionally. Friends be friends, it is that simple.

      I like blessing selfish behavior, like bad driving, by saying Be Well. I usually growl something like Really?!! which isn’t as cordial as your approach to the inevitable.

      Was the interview you heard on the Everything is Fine podcast? I heard Val Monroe on there and loved her instantly. Her sensible take on beauty and aging was spot on. Of course when I hear the word “sweetie” I think of Dr. Who and Riversong [a love interest] who often says “Hello, Sweetie” to the Doctor.

      [And my haven’t I gotten obscure…]

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  14. Loved reading these, and the comments. In the morning, when I pull open my shades, I say to myself “Opening up shop!” which is a carryover from my family’s ice cream business where we had to go in and open up the shop each morning. It makes me feel like I am preparing for a fresh start each morning, because you know, I am!

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    • Colleen, I love the “opening up shop” idea– and your reason for saying it. It makes perfect sense on two levels. When you actually take the time to listen to what you’re saying, it is fascinating. Maybe more insightful than you first think it’ll be.

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  15. I’ve never thought about it before, but I say “Take a deep breath” to myself a lot of the time. Or, sometimes it’s “Let it go.” When I’m out for a walk, I say “Show me something pretty.” I like what you say to the kids on the school bus. Now I want to say that too. If the parking lots here had letters I think I’d choose P for Peace.

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    • Robin, I don’t know how I got thinking about paying attention to what I say to myself, but I did. It was illuminating but not in a life-altering way.

      I love the idea of saying “show me something pretty” when you’re out for a walk. That’s a great way to frame the walk. By all means, bless the kids on the school bus. I’m sure it helps them do better during the day.

      P for peace is conceptually a wonderful idea, but that’d be a heck of large parking lot. Probably have to take a shuttle from your parking spot to the doors. 😉

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  16. I love this glimpse into your thoughts. I think I am constantly saying to myself, “OK, WHAT NEXT.” Or I’ll tell myself, “IT’S FINE. EVERYTHING IS FINE.” I sometimes have to stop and think about what it was that I need to remember, so I mumble “WHAT WAS THAT THING?” I guess most of my mantra includes organizing and priortizing my mind.

    When I’m out and about and I see someone with a clear and obvious struggle, I pause and put things in perspective and think how some people have a lot to handle.

    In the grocery store, I talk to myself and remind mysef of what I need to buy with verbal reminders. It’s a habit that started while mask wearing at the grocery store, and has continued even without the mask. I probably look like I’m coming unhinged.

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    • Ernie, I can understand why organizing is a priority with you. Your saying allow your mind to handle it well. I admire you taking the time to think good thoughts about someone who is struggling with who knows what problem. You are kind.

      About shopping in the grocery, I also talk to myself about what I’m buying. But I take it a step further into weirdness. If I have a few items to buy before I go into the store I assign each item to a finger or thumb. Then while I’m shopping I count on my fingers/thumbs to make sure I remember what to get. I blame a yoga instructor for teaching me to do this. It works, but you look nuts.

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  17. I am pretty sure that at this stage in life, we all talk to ourselves and most people think we’re strange. Or maybe that’s just me because I also talk to my car, my computer, the oven and loads of other things. You should hear me in the grocery store.

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    • Jennifer, you’re right. I also talk to machines and a few houseplants, too. I feel like I’m just the right amount of strange, so people will just have to deal with it. I do, however, attempt to keep my voice low when I’m out in public, being a magnet for good, dammit.

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  18. Do I talk to myself on occasion? Yes. It’s my way of problem solving. When I was younger, I’m sure there were some that thought me little odd, but now as a senior, people just grin.

    Flapdoodle-y or twaddle-ish? Who cares? After all it’s your blog, your world. I love love it because it’s Ally being Ally. Nuff said. ☺️

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    • Johnny, yet another advantage of aging: people just assume you’re a little bonkers and leave you alone to be yourself. As for whether this post is flapdoodle or twaddle, a wise commenter above has suggested it’s balderdash. That also works for me.

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  19. I can’t tell you how much I love this post. You magnetized some good, for sure.
    When I start to feel as if everything is not as it should be around me, I try to stop and say, “In every given moment I have everything I need.” It re-centres me, takes me out of a “lack” mentality, and makes me appreciate everything I already have.

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    • Arlene, thank you. What a wonderful phrase! I can see how it instantly helps you focus on what’s important, marginalize the rest. I’ve never heard that phrase before but I need to program it into my personal lexicon of sayings that I say. Thanks for sharing it here.

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  20. I dunno if it’s flapdoodle or twaddle, but it made me smile, so: worth the price of admission. I know, it’s free–but time is money, something I often say to myself when balking at paying for something I could do for myself but pay someone else to do so that I have more time to do the things I do to earn money. Except I rarely say that any more because I hardly work for money any more, and now time is something much, much different. In a good way.

    Also, I just loved the image of you saying “Learn something” to a bus full of kids. I am sure I will now do that, too. And learning that your mom was a schoolteacher. It shows. Also in a good way. 🙂

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    • Rita, good point about how your relationship with time and money changes as you get older. Hopefully in a positive way, of course. Some decisions are obvious, pay someone to do something– others are less clear.

      Yes, I feel obligated to send positive learning vibes to those kids on the school bus. They look sad, or maybe tired, so I do what I can in my own small way. I hadn’t thought of it before, but I’m sure my mother would get a kick out of what I do.

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  21. I’m very sorry to say that one thing that comes out of my mouth a lot is, “I hate people”. To clarify, I do not hate MOST people, just the person who is doing something stupid, be it driving or voting to curtail our rights or throwing their mask on the ground. To Mulder, I often sing an old early 80s song, “Just You and I”, because it’s just us. And sometimes, it’s another hit, “Just the Two of Us”. I don’t have a mantra, but I must say that I quite like yours. Perhaps I need one.

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    • J, laughing out loud. The truth will set you free. I get the drift of your phrase and the reasons for it. I often write “people be weird” in blog comments and I mean it in a less than flattering way.

      You have two good songs that sum up how life seems to be anymore. I’m glad Mulder is there to hear you sing, add his own take on the songs. As for a mantra, pick one that resonates with you. I sometimes add my own twist to my mantra by saying: “I am a magnet for good, dammit.” My revised version makes me happy.

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  22. I love, love, love this post, Ally! First because it is such a great snapshot into who you are with this little peak into your go-to phrases. Second because of the go-to phrases themselves. I love “I am a magnet for good.” and “Tres bien” – what wonderful rituals! And third, I think if I overheard you saying any of the above, the only thing I would wonder is how to duplicate you!

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    • Wynne, you give me hope that anyone who has heard me say these phrases doesn’t think I’m nutso. Or at least not nutty enough to call the authorities. I like the magnet mantra because many times it’s allowed me to feel confident while doing things I wasn’t sure I felt confident doing. Glad you liked this post, always great to get positive feedback.

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  23. Ally, I do like that mantra of being a magnet for good. It was nice to see your long-distance wish to the children on the bus to “learn something.” We have (somehow) become the main location for bus pick up and drop off in front of our house, so each weekday I have the opportunity to advise the children to learn something at least six times. I have a feeling I’m gonna be issuing that wish to all of them now. Those parking lots can be hellish to navigate, but I never thought to park in “H for Hell.” Lol. It’s always a good day to wake up and still be in the game of life, so why not show some love for life while the coffee is getting ready to be consumed? Since I’ve gotten older, my wife has pointed out I mumble to myself on occasion, and we’re both wondering what the hell I’m saying so I can’t share what I say…yet. Maybe we’ll figure it out. While my mumbling is definitely twaddle, I think this post is more flapdoodle.

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    • Bruce, I like being a magnet for good although it doesn’t always work. But when it does, cool beans.

      Telling the kids to learn something seems like a valuable thing to do. Those little faces pull at my heartstrings. I liked school, but it was a grind over which you had little control so I feel for them.

      As for parking, anything that makes it easier works for me. Try it and see if it works for you. Flapdoodle seems to be winning. Apparently I excel at it! 😉

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  24. “I am a magnet for good,” I will say that going forward . I even made a note.
    I also appreciate Yoda’s wise words. I enjoy a polite insult.

    I only have one tidbit to share, which you may recall because I believe you mentioned doing it as well. Every month on the first, I say Rabbit, Rabbit, Rabbit. 

    This was an enjoyable post to read. ❤️

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    • Kari, you’ve summed up the Yoda image perfectly: “a polite insult.” Yep, that’s what it is. I hope that goodness finds you now that you’ve decided to be a magnet for it. Seems to work for me, if only in that it reminds not everything is bad, there could be some good somewhere.

      I do say “rabbit, rabbit, rabbit” on the first day of the month– then I hop backwards! I’d forgotten about that one. It’s been ingrained in me since college. Thanks for mentioning it.

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  25. I always say Good Golly Moses – it kind of translates to “Ain’t Life Strange.” I knew a hyper religious lady long ago who, when confused about which way to go, would say aloud (and loudly) Good Golly Moses as if Moses himself was to blame for her predicament. Perhaps some little known part of the Bible describes Moses has chronically getting lost – I dunno!

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    • Jan, I’ve never heard that saying. I’ve heard Good Golly Miss Molly, but not the same meaning. Seems like Moses did okay finding things, the 10 Commandments come to mind, he managed to not get lost on that mission. But then I’m not a hyper religious lady so what do I know?

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  26. I often say to myself, “Get a grip!” and I often complain that I’m at “sixes and sevens” or when trying to make a decision, that it’s “six of that or half dozen of the other.” I do mangle some of these time-worn (and worn-out) phrases. When it comes to politics, you might hear me mutter either “can’t win for losing” or “the more things change, the more they remain the same.” Although I was an English lit grad, my vocabulary and phraseology are somewhat impoverished. For instance, I’d have to look up flapdoodle and twaddle to discern where your post lies.

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    • Marie, I like what you say. I use the phrase at “sixes and sevens,” too. Not often, but I like how sophisticated it sounds. My mother used to say “can’t win for losing” which is the truth many times. I hear her voice inside my head when I see those words.

      If you want to know the definitions of flapdoodle and twaddle just click on the words at the top of the post. I added links to dictionary definitions.

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    • Donna, I get that. When we go to Costco we sometimes have to park in a nearby Target parking lot, then walk over to Costco. This means that when we get back to the car one of us [guess who] has to take the cart back to Costco. BUT the savings are worth it!

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  27. I’m fairly certain I say “What in the actual hell…” quite a few times during the day; possibly with a couple of other more “colorful” words thrown in for good measure. And I am guilty of talking to myself (out loud), to the computer, the car or whatever I’m currently dealing with.

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  28. Ally Bean, your sense of humor knocks me out, and your commenters are just as funny. It is a delight to chuckle my way through your blogs and comments. My current favorite is “Dagnabit”, a catch all word for anything that runs amuck and/or doesn’t work out as planned. Sort of Elmer Fudd-ish — oh wait—I think it was Yosemite Sam. PS: consider me flapdoodle-y.

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  29. “Learn something” – I like that. I try to learn something new every day. I sometimes tell myself to relax. It was once overheard by someone who thought I was telling them to relax (I wasn’t even sure what they were doing) and they were offended.

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  30. I cannot think of any phrase I say to myself, besides negative comments in my head like What the hell?’ which seems to apply to everything these days.

    It’s rare that I park in lots with numbers or letters (I can only think of the airport), but I’d be totally down with always parking in H for Hell.

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    • Bijoux, yes I agree, what the hell seems like something to say daily, over something, always stupid. I park in many parking lots and the ones with letters are the best. I don’t remember numbers, but letters stick with me. Especially ‘H’ for hell. And there I am bringing this comment full circle!

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  31. Definitely more flapdoodle. I can’t think of any phrases, per se. Maybe the “breathe” one comes in handy. Mostly I tend to think with my lips moving and facial expressions, which concerns my husband greatly. No poker face here!

    Loved the opening meme. Gotta remember that one.

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    • Eilene, almost everyone believes this is flapdoodle. Duly noted.

      No poker face? I am a master [mistress?] of looking benignly indifferent when need be. With friends, however, I’m like you. Totally expressive, sometimes to their dismay.

      The Yoda meme is a good one. Apt, if I do say so.

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  32. Oh Ally, you make me chuckle! Yet another vote for flapdoodle, I have no idea why! I can’t think of any expression that I say to myself but I shall pay more attention in the coming days, now that you have shared yours!

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    • Judy, I’m able to swear when need be so I get that. I like your approach to parking. The cart corrals are easy to spot. Smart thinking. I have a white car and know what you mean about trying to see it. Sometimes I dream of buying an orange or cobalt blue car so I’d see it no matter what, then I remember how expensive cars are so I keep mine.

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  33. “It’s not that bad” or “It could have been worse” are two truisms that have escaped my lips many times. “Tres bien” is a very good way to greet the day. “Good morning, Lord,” is also cheerful. Good one, Ally!

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    • Marian, you tell yourself some good ones. I sometimes remind myself that something is not a big deal which is kind of a synthesis of your two sayings. But I’m not consistent with that idea, now that I muse on it.

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  34. I tend to lose my car in parking lots, so picking a specific letter would help with that. Why didn’t I think of that before? I tend to go around saying really? WTH? or other expressions of disbelief. I also encourage myself by repeating, “I can do this!”

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    • Margaret, my mother and her friends were adamant about picking a letter and always parking near it. I do the same thing with colors, preferring blue, but cannot stick with a number. Expressions of disbelief seem in keeping with our times. If you aren’t saying them to yourself occasionally are you even aware?!! 😉

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  35. I like flapdoodle for a word Ally. As a person who lives alone, it really doesn’t matter if I talk to myself and/or offend anyone when I get annoyed or start my day. Like that seagull, I can get it out of my system. 🙂 I get up and while making coffee, I have on the news and that usually sets me off before my eyes are all the way open and some days more than others, I start to think I am becoming a cranky old broad, akin to Jack Lemmon in the movie “The Out of Towners” as I complain so much lately and hop onto websites to do a chat session or get customer service info, then I am bombarded with “excuse me, would you mind to take a little survey?” With the utility companies, I think “if I don’t take the little survey, will they mess with me down the road?”

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    • Linda, another vote for flapdoodle, the winner by a long shot. I’m laughing here because Z-D cannot handle the news first thing in the day. Years ago I cut him off because he’d get so snarly about what was going on, muttering about people, before he or I had finished one mug of coffee. It was for his own good to not hear the news then– and my sanity too.

      I never thought about whether the companies that dump those little surveys on you are keeping track of you if you don’t take it. Are the surveys a loyalty test and we don’t know it? Now you got me wondering.

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      • Ha ha – yes, hearing the news first thing in the morning often sets the tone for the day. Back during the campaign for the last general election, I’d get to the Park and there was a woman walker who would look for someone to walk with just so she could complain about candidate Biden. I actually prefer walking alone anyway, so I’d dodge her every chance I got.

        Companies say they are anonymous surveys but I don’t believe that and could be a loyalty test. But it seems to me, if it’s not a survey of some sort, it is someone needing to get an Atta Boy or Atta Girl after a phonecall, or chat session these days. Every time I went grocery shopping in the Fall, I got an e-mail asking me to describe my shopping experience at my Meijer. Why???

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        • I’d avoid a chatty woman who only wants to talk politics, too. We don’t shop at Meijer often, but they don’t email us afterward asking for feedback. Suddenly I feel a little marginalized. Or maybe relieved!

          Liked by 1 person

          • When I took the bus for years to Downtown Detroit, I got on the bus and opened my book as quickly as I could to avoid chatting with anyone. I have an old radio with an ear bud. The radio is very small. I have thought of wearing it, but not turning it on, to avoid chitchat. I’d feel relieved to not be part of their marketing campaign or their need to get customer feedback.

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  36. I love this post. I don’t think I talk to myself very much–or maybe I just don’t notice. One thing I do say is very simple. In the morning, I may be lying in bed, dozing and thinking. Then suddenly I say, “Okay,” and I pop right up, as though the word makes it happen.

    Being a widow and living alone, I ought to talk to myself more. Having a few mantras at the ready is a good idea. I sometimes say, “Bless him (or her)” when I pass someone. But having a specific wish is even better. I like “Learn something” for school buses. And the day’s first sip of coffee deserves a special phrase.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Nicki, I’m glad you liked this post. I knew that I said things consistently in the same situations, but had never tried to keep track of what I said. So I became more self-aware.

      I’m laughing at the idea that saying “Okay” is what gets you up in the morning. That makes perfect illogical logic sense to me. I don’t know when I started saying tres bien over my coffee, but I figure it can only help me deal with whatever the day will hold.

      Like

    • evilsquirrel13, I like your reasoning about Row 8 in place of H. I’ve never taken this consistent parking idea to its logical conclusion, but you have and it’s brilliant. I’m going to say yes, when need be, 8 is the stand-in. As for Row 666, now you’re just being silly.

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  37. “I’ll be jiggered.” Which applies to any situation where you don’t know what to say. Or when you don’t really care, but know you should appear to be amazed or interested.

    Also, “Come on people,” which is another good, universal phrase. It applies particularly well when referring to idiots at a four-way stop, but sounds nicer.

    Liked by 2 people

    • An Audience of One, I love the “I’ll be jiggered” saying. I’ve only read it, never heard it said. My equivalent, courtesy of Snagglepuss, is “heavens to murgatroyd” that I use it when I want to appear interested in something I have nothing to say about.

      As for a four-way stop, you are much nicer than I when I get into one of those situations. I usually just yell, snarl really, GO! And when someone doesn’t I pronounce him an idiot.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s a great one – and yes, certainly the same usage applies.

        And truthfully, I’ve gone the snarling route plenty of times. I do TRY to start nice, but sometimes you have to call it like it you see it. After all, most people seem to turn into idiots at four way stops anyway, so your way of cutting to the chase makes a lot of sense.

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  38. I spent most of my time at work yesterday trying to figure out if I have a mantra (no), and whether I talk to myself — aloud or otherwise. I decided I’m either linguistically economical, or my jib’s just cut differently. Most of my ‘conversations’ are limited to one or two words, like “Idiot!” for the driver going 30 miles over the speed limit, or a mild expletive like “Crap!” when I drop a favorite tool into the water, or discover the neighborhood cat’s managed to kill another bird. There is one bit of wisdom I’ll sometimes let slip from time to time. I got it from Grandma, and it’s remarkably useful in a variety of settings: “There ain’t no accountin’ for folks.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda, I’m smiling at the thought of you contemplating if you have mantra while you work. I love your Grandma’s saying because it is true, homespun, of course– and did I mention, TRUE?. As for your economy of words, that’s admirable. I can be way too wordy when I get off on a tangent– and the older I get the more tangental I’ve become.

      Like

  39. For several years I’d pick a new mantra every New Year’s Day. One of my favorites was “Inhale the good shit, exhale the bull shit.” The one I chose the year my husband died was the most effective: “Hope, health and moving forward.” I would repeat it whenever I did things alone for the first time to give me courage.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jean, I like both of your mantras, adopted for different reasons. It’s interesting how just saying something that you perceive to be positive can help you get through the day, week, year. You’re right, it’s about screwing up your courage.

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  40. I’m sure I do…but they’re so normal to me I can’t identify them? I tell my kids they’re a “joy and a blessing” most days (even though sometimes surface-me doesn’t feel that way)!

    I love how you describe your morning coffee: “It’s a blessing and a goal and a hope all in one phrase.” Growing up my Dad would take his first long sip and say “Heavenly.” Every time. It’s such a happy memory for me, and now I understand.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Elisabeth, you’re good to tell your kids that which you say, regardless of the immediate truth of the statement.

      I can understand how saying “Heavenly” over morning coffee would be a positive way to start the day. It is a happy memory, thanks for sharing it here.

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  41. I adore your Mantra for when you leave the house, and I might adopt that one.

    I am getting the biggest kick out of your parking lot theory. I’ve never heard of such a thing, and I will probably ALWAYS think of you when I see a parking area with lettered lots. (Your Mom sounds like a hoot)

    I have some, but probably not that unusual. I tell my husband and kids when they depart to Make Good Choices. 😳 (also, I love you)
    I still say Lefty Loosey, Righty Tighty when trying to work the hose spigot, or something else challenging.
    After getting out of the bath, I always say: I’m CLEAN to anyone or no one when finished.
    I find myself saying or mumbling daily: What in the hell? Or just The hell? This works for many daily scenarios.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Suz, the mantra is soothing and inspiriting and most importantly, easy to remember. My mother was a hoot, but only around those people she liked. She was a super introvert.

      Make good choices is a wonderful thing to say to yourself, to others, to the world in general. I like that. I’m glad you tell whoever is listening that you’re clean. Best to be clear on that point, always.

      As for what the hell… who isn’t saying that anymore?

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  42. Not sure it is a mantra but whenever I find myself in a “situation” I start singing Favorite Things. As for talking to myself, we have full blown conversations and sometimes we agree. I personally park as far away from everyone as possible because the general public is full of ignorant a-holes.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Danny, your approach to talking to yourself is unique. Singing a particular song. I like it. Good point about parking away from people. I do that at the grocery, but that lot is smaller with no letters or numbers or colors to go by.

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  43. What a delightful title and subject for a post. I like all your ideas. I feel the same way about coffee, though I don’t put specific words to it. Having the same letter for parking, and a funny way to remember that letter, is a terrific idea. Blessings on school kids–also a good idea. The only thing I can think of that I sometimes remind myself of is: I can do hard things. I should probably say that to myself more often lately, because just about everything seems hard now. Well, mainly just walking, but that affects so much. That and reminding myself what my mom would tell me frequently as a kid: no matter how bad you have it, there is always someone who has it worse. I watched the movie Father Stu last week, and it put me to shame for complaining about my current state. Seeing someone deal with way worse helps me put my trials into perspective.

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  44. I really really really like the way you think. No flapdoodle there – all honest-to-goodness goodness. I find myself parking in the “B” lot of a large parking lot. Then I can sing to myself “Let it be, let it be” and remember where I’m parked. Besides that, Let it Be is a great mantra that helps me during the day. Also, “You can do this!”

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Travel Architect, flapdoodle is the winner by far. Apparently I’m not twaddle-ish, a surprise to me. I had to convince myself to remember to pay attention to what I say mindlessly when prompted by circumstances. If you do this experiment on yourself, you may be amazed– or alarmed, I suppose. Who am I to say who you really are? 🤔

      Liked by 1 person

  45. I often encourage myself to “use my tools,” which is a way of saying I need to approach the situation differently rather than assuming its the catastrophe it appears to be. I have a way out, I just have to use it. Lo and behold, the new solution shows up then. I just have to be willing to use a new way of thinking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • KDKH, this is BRILLIANT! I get what you’re saying and why/how it frees you to find solutions and get unstuck. Yes, this is something I need to add to my how-to deal with life toolbox. Thanks for sharing it here.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Barbara, I love this. Of course the Muppets would have a good saying, applicable to many situations, profoundly useful. Thanks for sharing it here. The letter parking idea really works, when you’re in a parking lot or garage that uses letters.

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  46. Okay, that was fun. I’d have to take the same approach as you, cataloging what I say at the moment I say it. But I know mine are out there. Great sentence to kick off the blog (and LOL’ing that you acknowledged it). Also, you say you were “left to your own devices”. I’m glad that phrase hasn’t been left in the past!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dave, I only began to think about this when Z-D, the semi-retired who is here almost all the time now, mentioned that he’d noticed that I always say “learn something” when a school bus goes by. It got me wondering what else I say habitually.

      I’m glad you liked the first sentence, I felt like a true wordsmith with that one. Is “left to your own devices” no longer said? I mean, I have devices and I am often left with them, so why not say so? 🤓

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  47. LOL! Wisdom is chasing me too and who knew I could run this fast!!! 🤣 That’s a funny little rip. I’m going to remember it but most likely only apply it to myself.

    When coming home from a trip of any length and I see my valley come into view for the first time I always say to myself and sometimes out loud, “Legends are to our backs, and we are come home”. It’s what Gandalf said to Bilbo when they got first glimpse of the Shire after their adventure in the Hobbit. Or close to it. I probably botch it. 🙃

    I don’t think I say anything else, but I’m going to pay attention to myself and see if I do.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Deborah, I loved that Yoda image too. I could stop laughing after I saw it. Nice way to be polite in a passive-aggressive way.

      You are highbrow quoting Gandalf. I’m impressed with how apt that quote is. Smart thing to say to yourself, to anyone who’s listening to you.

      Once I decided to pay attention to what I say, I was amazed/underwhelmed. I mean I do say the same things repeatedly, but I’m not showing any great shakes of ingenuity. Kind of fun exercise in self-awareness if nothing else.

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  48. It took me a while. I knew The Engineer’s saying instantly when I read your post but mine was harder to find. I have a few it turns out but the one people will remember about me when I am gone is “and the sun was shining”. I am so literal. My memories revolve around whether or not the sun was shining. I hope my grandchildren remember me during any sunset. Maybe it’s a weird tangent but hey it’s all I’ve got today in the gloomy cloudy day. As to Yoda and the saying – that’s hilarious. And to parking I’m with a few others. Don’t live anywhere that the parking lots are that big! H for hell… that’s a good one. Bernie

    Liked by 2 people

    • Bernie, “and the sun is shining” is a wonderful thing to say and be remembered for. I like it. I agree, the Yoda image made me laugh out loud. I live in a world filled with parking lots and parking garages. It’s easy to get lost looking for your car. “H” helps.

      Like

  49. I don’t think it’s either flapdoodle-y OR twaddle-ish (and I clicked on the links to make sure I had the proper definitions). I find it very interesting. I don’t know if there are things I often say (to myself or others). I am now going to start paying extra special attention because I’m guessing there are. I could, however, tell you things that I have noticed others say frequently, but that’s not the same thing. Love the Yoda meme, too. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Robin, I didn’t really think about doing this until my husband, recently retired and at home with me all day, mentioned I talk to school buses. It got me thinking about what else I say. If you decide to pay attention to yourself you may be, I hope, pleasantly surprised. I was.

      Liked by 1 person

  50. I say, “Speaking of raccoons” when I want to change the subject. Allow me to explain. When I worked for a church curriculum publisher, I worked in an open area with five other editors. One of them was an elderly woman who constantly had visitors who would stop by to chat. Well, one guy came and stood there for at least an hour talking with her. We couldn’t escape hearing the conversation. The guy went on and on. We kept waiting for him to leave. Finally, he said, “Speaking of raccoons,” and launched into a story. The rest of us burst out laughing. Suddenly he realized we’d all been listening and left.

    Liked by 2 people

    • L. Marie, that is HILARIOUS. I love, love, love this story and why you say what you do. I’m going to adopt this phrase to use when stuck in conversations I don’t want to be in. Thanks for my LOL moment of the day. 🦝 [According to my emojis that is a raccoon. I dunno…]

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  51. Definitely flapdoodle-y, but please don’t ask me why (it’s just a feeling, you know?). Whenever I’m faced with something I definitely do not want to do, I always mutter “It’ll be a cold day in Hamtramck…,” which is a city near where I grew up in Michigan. I think I stole it from a friend of a college roommate of mine, who actually was from Hamtramck. – Marty

    Liked by 2 people

    • Marty, that’s a perfect example of saying something habitually that might sound strange to other people. I like it. Flapdoodle is winning this contest. I had my money on twaddle, but what do I know? 🤷‍♀️

      Like

  52. Flapdoodle-y… what an awesome word, which I have to immediately submit to my active vocabulary! 🙂

    OMG, hahaha, I just realized I misread the first sentence as “I am a magnet for food” and I was like, well, that sounds like someone who enjoys going out and having a good meal 🙂 LOL Magnet for good makes so much more sense.

    I also love that you say “tres bien”, because I’d agree that the first cup of coffee in the morning is indeed tres bien. If you want to add German to your rotation, we’d say “sehr gut”.

    Trying to think of phrases that I say to myself and can only come up with “I can’t make this shit up” and “one thing at a time”.

    Liked by 2 people

    • San, I’m laughing out loud about your misreading of what my magnet does. Sure, sure, food finds me no problem and that can be good, unless I’m trying to squeeze into a certain pair of jeans. But as a rule, I ask my magnet/the Universe to bring me good.

      Thanks for telling me the German way to say “very good.” I admit to knowing very little German despite having German ancestors on both sides of my family line.

      I say “you can’t make this shit up” too, because well, you just can’t. Sadly that saying floats into my head often, especially these last few years.

      Like

    • New word for me as well, and I’m ready to incorporate it into every-day speech, too good to pass up on, I wholeheartedly agree!

      And what’s hilarious is I misread the “magnet for Food”, too, and I re-read it because it didn’t “jive” with The Spectacled Bean I’ve come to know. So I figured it was a passing error to be ignored, until I saw that I’m not alone in misreading that, and am now wondering if I should have had THREE chocolate cookies today, instead of TWO 😀

      As for German: one of my friends in high school tried to not swear, so she only swore in German. Imo curses in German sound even “stronger” than ones in English 🙂

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      • Endless Weekend, the only thing I can think to say about your comment is GOOD GRAVY! I mean, all things considered, it does seem to be the appropriate response.

        German is a language that I know almost nothing about. Now I have two words I can say, so this is progress. ☕️

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  53. That sentence about wisdom made me laugh out loud! I loved it so much I had to share it with my friends even before I started reading your post. I tend towards self-deprecating humor so I just had to say, “Yes, this is me…I run so fast that wisdom can’t catch up with me!” LOL

    I love all your sayings, all very positive — specially the “I’m a magnet for good”. Too funny about H for “Hell”. I’ll bet your mom found your reason to be funny even if she didn’t want to admit it. But I’m really curious where you live or where you go that parking lots require numbers/letters. I don’t remember when the last time was that I went to such a place — but it’s possible I just haven’t been paying attention and have been relying on others to lead me to where the car is parked. Ha-ha!

    I tried to think of things I regularly say and couldn’t come up with much; I’ll have to do more self-awareness sessions!! I do talk to myself sometimes, like “Okay, M, time to get up and do something productive” if I find myself indulging in too much couch-sitting or internet-surfing. I say, “Stay in your lane!” when another car accidentally veers into my lane. I pray, “God, bless them and their families” when I see a bad accident on the freeway. I can’t think of anything else — althoughI do know that my husband and I engage in fun scripts occasionally. I’ll have to try to remember it next time we do. Oh, I talk to the dog often!! I not only say something TO him, but I also make up his response to me! I tease/play with him often, and I say out what what he must be saying, “Oh, geez….why do I have to put up with this?” LOL

    Very fun read and interesting topic, as usual, Ally Bean…and it’s neither flapdoodle nor twaddle in my opinion.

    Liked by 2 people

    • M, the Yoda wisdom seems spot on. I couldn’t stop laughing when I saw it, so I had to share it here.

      I’m sure you’re right that my “H in hell” approach to parking made my mother laugh. She had a good sense of humor, but tried to raise a proper daughter. You don’t deal with large parking lots/garages? I live in a region with over 2 million people, we drive everywhere, then must park. It’s easy to forget where you left your car.

      I talk to myself and encourage me to get going, go do something, too. I understand your approach to life. Hilarious that you talk to the dog– and then respond as if you were he. That’s funny and makes for some great conversations, I’d guess.

      I’d not considered the possibility that this post might not be either flapdoodle or twaddle. Interesting answer, thank you.

      Like

      • In my younger/single years, I lived in the Los Angeles area and I have had to deal with large parking lots/structures more then. In parking structures, I’d remember the floor and then just backtrack, remembering how I made my way from the car to the elevator and do the reverse. It didn’t work in bigger venues where you could exit the building/venue in a spot different from where you entered; that usually only worked in large shopping venues/malls but not in something like sports stadiums. I did learn my error the hard way once in a parking lot of a baseball stadium, entering in one door and not taking note then going out another door. Luckily, I went out with friends then and they gave me a ride, driving around looking for my car!

        Nowadays, living in a coastal town of San Diego area, I don’t go out to places like that much anymore and when I do, I’m usually with my husband/son/friends and I just follow them. LOL My husband doesn’t like dealing with huge crowds so we may get to a baseball game/concert or some other large event once a year. My son is really good about remembering or “feeling” his way — maybe much more aware? better recall? — so he has helped us many times. He’ll be on his own soon, and my husband may need my assistance remembering where we parked (we’re both getting older! LOL) so I should be more aware and try to stick with one like you do — but sometimes, it’s just not possible when you’re lucky to get a spot period! Oh!! I have read and even used a tip: Take a picture of the column number so you’ll remember because our memories now fail. I think I did this when we were out of the country in Jan 2020 and had to park in a humungous parking structure!

        Liked by 1 person

        • I’m laughing about your friends driving you around so you can find your car. Parking in stadiums is always confusing even when you think you know *for sure* where you are. Ha! As if…

          That’s excellent advice about taking a picture of where you parked. I haven’t been anywhere with complicated parking [like the airport parking garage] in a white but will try to remember to do like you did. We all have our tricks about how to not get lost.

          Like

          • It was funny once we found my car! But believe me, I had nightmares for a few years after that — dreaming I couldn’t find my car and no one to help me.

            I’ve also done the “click my remote and listen for the chirp from my car” in some instances I couldn’t find my car because I was too distracted when I parked and went in the store that my brain didn’t register where in relation to the door I parked. Nowadays, too, I try to park in the same rows the few times I do go to the stores.; I park on this row when I go to Target; I park on this row when I go to the big grocery store; and this row when I go to the smaller farmers market store — I guess they’re my “go-to” rows, similar to your Row H but I only know them by their location in relation to the front door. 🙂

            I just asked my husband if there are parking lots we use on a regular basis besides the airport’s (which we don’t use anymore) and convention center’s (where we park to catch a baseball game or other bigger events) that are numbered/lettered. We could only think of the amusement parks around: Legoland, Disneyland, Sea World, etc. but I feel like more parking structures (like the hospital’s/clinic’s) do have these row designations but we just don’t notice….so I’m going to try to remember to look when I’m out and about. Our Target has a huge parking lot; I won’t be surprised if the rows are numbered/lettered!

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  54. “It’s better to have and not need, than to need and not have.”

    I got this one from my dad, and it’s served me well over the years. Removes any indecision. Headed outside on a cloudy day and wondering whether you should bring an umbrella? Trot out that mantra and you’ve got your answer. And this can be applied to almost any situation imaginable.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Mark, this is great advice and now that I know it I’ll add it to my personal lexicon of sayings and phrases I say to myself. Anything that brings clarity to my life is much appreciated. Heaven knows there are days when the cloud of confusion follows me everywhere.

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  55. Ally, I love your sayings and there’s also a multitude of riches to be found in the comments. I’ve realised that my internal monologue is actually a bit of a Negative Norah, a Debbie Downer if you will. It’s something I’ve been working on and I’m going to seek a mantra rather than keep on telling myself that I’m tired (even when I’m not). Thanks Ms Bean 🙂

    Other than that, I do talk to myself a lot, especially when out walking and always hope that no-one else notices, but maybe my neighbours are thinking I’m some mad old duck! 😀

    Like

    • Deb, I agree. Many commenters have suggested some good mantras and self-talk that could be helpful, either to feel empowered or laugh in the face of dismay. It’s not like I’m a Pollyanna, but for some reason I do manage to say some good things to myself.

      I like the idea of you walking around talking to yourself, your neighbors with raised eyebrows, wondering about you. It sounds like the beginning scene of a fun movie.

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  56. Hi Ally! Your “H is for hell” parking space made me laugh out loud. We don’t have alphabetized parking spaces here, but I distinctly remember parking way out in hell at the mall during the holidays when I was younger.

    As far as things I say to myself…well, I’m trying to get past the swear words…

    I’ll come back if I think of something.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mary, we have fewer lots with alpha letters than numbers, but when I get into one I announce my intention.

      Yes, I get you about the swearing. I say things that are not suitable for this PG-13 blog, but more as a reaction to situations and not habitually.

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  57. I have lots of little mantras that I pep-talk myself with. One that keeps me from descending into clutter and laziness is, “If it takes less than a minute, just do it.” I only wish my husband had this mantra.

    When I’m shopping for myself, I ask one question, “But do I love it?” If the answer is no, then it goes right back on the rack.

    (Of course, I often take a shot and ask the cats to vacuum or get me something to drink, but that has yet to be successful.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • nance, good mantra about one minute, do it. It is perfectly sensible. In fact I think that mantra should be part of marriage vows!

      I try to love clothes and accessories that I buy but sometimes the only thing that fits is something I don’t love so I buy it because I gotta wear something. Still…

      You say your cats aren’t helpful? Well color me shocked.

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  58. Greetings, Ally. I don’t say things to myself. But I do have an approach to parking in parking lots. I don’t like congestion. So, I usually park in spots where no other cars are nearby. That way, fewer potentially annoying situations can develop. But sometimes that can’t be done, so I take a deep breath, pull in next to somebody, and hope for the best.

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  59. Do you, like me, consistently say things to yourself in certain situations that if overheard might make someone wonder about you? I think my facial expressions say unspoken words. 😏🤔🤣🥰

    If so, care to share what you say? “Well, that was interesting” keeps me learning new things. It’s a challenge for me to not go up and ask questions when those moments happen. I love the idea of where to park in a parking lot…………..why didn’t I think of that, now I shall ponder what letter would or wouldn’t be better for me than H for Hell! 🤣

    If you were forced to decide, do you think this post is more flapdoodle-y OR twaddle-ish? I think you’re great at combining them both. I always smile, regardless of what your post is about!

    Like

    • Shelley, I tend to have an expressive face, too. I’ve learned over the years to try to keep it neutral, but I don’t always achieve that goal. I had a yoga instructor who suggested we should always say “isn’t that interesting” when encountering someone spouting what we thought was a wacko idea. It’s useful, I get that.

      I try to keep things fresh and different here. I suppose you’re right that I do combine both flapdoodle and twaddle equally, occasionally drifting into malarkey. Thanks for stopping by to comment.

      Liked by 1 person

      • The world is full of “that’s interesting” things/moments to discover. 😉
        As I read your posts, I imagine the expression on your face as you write your clever words to reenact the scenes onto the page for us to admire. Have you ever set a mirror in front of you like I do when I do my face pilates exercises? I was shocked and my mirror is tiny! 🤣😂🤣 That little mirror has helped encourage myself to smile more! 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  60. hahahaha that MAY actually be my most favourite meme ever lol going to try to search it now and send it to everyone I know!!! LOL…

    I do this thing (I will try to explain it as best I can lol) where if I am trying to differentiate between my husband and my daughter, i.e. making them egg rounds in a pan… he likes only pepper on his eggs, I make hers with a sprinkle of salt and pepper, in order to remember which one is his lol I always look for the imperfect egg (in this case eggs) and I say to myself, this one is husband’s egg because he’s imperfect LOL…. I don’t know why I can’t use another example LOL it makes me laugh in my head all the time and I’ve been meaning to tell him but it sounds like it makes more sense only in my head LOL… I do it with other things too, not just eggs hahaa

    Like

    • Jenn, yours may be the best, most relatable, comment on this post yet. OF COURSE you associate the imperfect egg with your husband. WHO WOULDN’T? Your daughter is perfect, of course. I hope you decide to tell your husband about this logic and share his response. Tell him after he eats his peppery egg, of course.

      Like

  61. I smiled at your park in H. When I traveled extensively for work, I took to writing down where I parked – they told you where in the lot when you arrived so you couldn’t have a regular place. I only lost my car once. However, just last week, we parked in a new to us parking garage, came out a door that was “exit only” and coming back, went into the wrong garage and up 2 flights of stairs to not find our car! It took 2 more tries to find the right garage entrance. I looked at it as “more steps for the day”!

    I don’t have anything I regularly say to myself. Oh dear.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pat, I’ve done exactly what you did last week. I exit a garage going out a one way door, then can’t find which ingress door gets me to the correct stairway. It’s infuriating, but it’s also good exercise. In a way. I like your idea of writing down where you parked– or taking a picture of your car.

      Not everyone has something they say habitually, but for those of us who do, we are a bit wacko. At least that’s my takeaway from the comments on this post.

      Liked by 1 person

  62. Hi Ally – not enough room to type in my running internal narrative based on what’s happening around me, that would cause all to wonder about me. Long run-on incomplete sentence, sorry! Great post – as always very enjoyable 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Barbara, what I’ve learned from the comments on this post is that many people know they’re talking to themselves and what they’re saying is a bit wacko, BUT we do it anyway. We’re all consistent, but a little nuts.

      Liked by 1 person

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