Applying A Business Framework To This Personal Blog To Tell A Tale

~ ~ ✍🏻 ~ ~

Above is the Rudolph Framework. It’s from marketing guru + author Ann Handley’s newsletter called Total Annarchy. The framework is a lighthearted take on the Christmas song and children’s book, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

The Rudolph Framework “helps you understand the actual problem you and your business solve for your customers– not the one you *think* you solve.” Click HERE to be taken to her fun explanation of this framework.

While the Rudolph Framework is meant to help a business clarify its purpose, it’s applicable to personal blogs. It’s easy to conceptualize a personal blog as a business. As such the blog provides customers [that’d be you] with a product [my blog posts] that solve a problem for you.

I know that I’m getting abstract here, but I have a tale to tell and I feel the need to explain how I came by it, lest you think I’m nuts. Which I probably am, but let’s not dwell on that, shall we?

Just go with it.

Thus using the Rudolph Framework I give you the following story created by moi by filling in the blanks, occasionally adjusting a few words so that it makes more sense. See what you think.

In fact, should you like to fly your freak flag, you could get jiggy and try applying the Rudolph Framework to your own blog, even. I’d love to see what you come up with. ‘Cuz, you know, I’m nosy curious.

~ ~ ✍🏻 ~ ~

THE TALE OF THE SPECTACLED BEAN AND THE COMMUNITY IT HAS CREATED

Once upon a time, there was a delightful personal blog called The Spectacled Bean.

It had the capacity to be a catalyst for conversation based on the tales, thoughts, and tribulations of a free spirit in suburbia.

Some people doubted it because it was not all about the benjamins.

But one day, the woman who writes the blog realized she was perfectly happy doing what she was doing in the way she was doing it.

Which meant that the blog could be as varied and wonderfully idiosyncratic as the cool kids who read and comment on it.

To help them have sense of belonging online where they are understood and accepted, as long they’re polite and not spammers and not stealing my content.

And that matters because the cool kids are the heroes of this blog and what make The Spectacled Bean fun and engaging.

Thus in the process, this blog has helped coalesce a community of articulate + good-natured lurkers, readers, and cool kids who have the savvy to know a good thing when they read it.

Everyone gets a kiss. And a big ‘ole thank you.

~ ~ ✍🏻 ~ ~

175 thoughts on “Applying A Business Framework To This Personal Blog To Tell A Tale

  1. This is a fun exercise. Since I write for myself, I don’t care about benjamins at all. In fact, I’m not sure how I would transition to making money without angst. It’s about the community with all the wonderful comments. I’ve learned so much from other bloggers. Non-blogging stuff too.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Judy, yes, yes. That’s how I think about blogging, too. I learn so much about how people live their lives, and how they process their emotions, and what gives them joy. Things I’d never learn in my real life, but are revealed in personal blogs.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Every so often, someone (usually on Twitter) reminds people that “art is art, even if it sucks. So do your art and don’t worry about people saying it’s sucky.”

    Sometimes I worry that people won’t like a particular post. And then I think, “It’s my blog, I’ll write what I want.”

    Liked by 5 people

  3. I do not have a blog but I do enjoy reading (and often commenting) on blogs. I refer to my blog friends all the time when I am speaking to my family and I have found a circle of regular blogs that I read whenever they post. Your blog is always enjoyable, thought-provoking, funny, kind, informative, etc., etc. Keep up the great work! Thank you very much for being my blog friend!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Ellen D, I’m glad you found me and my blog. I enjoy your comments and support which are, of course, virtual but as valuable as any that I’d get in real life. You’ve hit upon a cogent point when you mention that you speak of blog friends to your real life friends. I do the same thing because a friend is a friend regardless of where you are in the world. Thanks so much for being one of the cool kids.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lynette, I feel the same way. If I was stressed about writing this blog, I’d not do it. BUT as it stands, the way in which I’ve come to keep this blog going works for me– and lets all the cool kids have a place to hang. Thanks for stopping by to comment.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. I love that you started this blog. It’s “right up your ally!” Even though I don’t always comment, it’s fun to read other responses to see how other people think. As long as you keep posting, I’ll keep reading!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. This is an interesting post, Ally. Fascinating about the Rudolph Framework. I like to think I am one of the fortunate ‘articulate, good-natured lurker, reader, cool kids’ who have come across your blog. As far as the kiss…….COVID times at the moment……πŸ™‚

    Liked by 4 people

    • Erica/Erika, I hadn’t thought about the danger of giving a kiss during a pandemic. Granted mine is virtual so I think we’re all good here. πŸ˜‰

      You are definitely one of the articulate, good-natured cool kids, and thank you for being one. It’s been great to get to know you here and on your blog.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Janet, I’d love to read your story if you do the Rudolph Framework. It was fun to write mine, considering it was a goof to do so. I’m glad to have you here as one of the cool kids. We need to stick together in this virtual world!

      Liked by 2 people

      • You attract your readers with your writing and topics, nurture them with positivity and thoughtful posts, and set the tone, so to speak. You have built a supportive, and friendly community here. I see it every time I visit.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Thank you for your kind comments. You’ve summarized what I’m trying to do here better than I ever have. I like writing so that’s fun, and I enjoy reading what people have to say about what I’ve written. The engagement is what keeps this going for me at this point.

          Liked by 2 people

  6. You have one of the most enjoyable blogs in the blogosphere! This is the key:

    But one day, the woman who writes the blog realized she was perfectly happy doing what she was doing in the way she was doing it.

    Which meant that the blog could be as varied and wonderfully idiosyncratic as the cool kids who read and comment on it.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Marty, I didn’t think to put the image near my story [obviously] but thank you for taking the time to do that. I don’t know that I’ll make a habit of dragging business paradigms into my personal blog, but for a one-off it was fun.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. The Rudolph Framework! I love it! My blog was supposed to be a professional web presence that sold my books. It isn’t. I have maybe a dozen blog readers and I doubt I’ve sold one book through posting on the blog. But I enjoy it, posting daily keeps me in writing trim, and I love the people who come to comment, including one Mrs. Bean. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 3 people

    • Marian, when I read about this framework I immediately loved it too. It appeals to my sense of whimsy and pragmatism. Even though your purpose for writing your blog has changed over the years, you keep doing it and that makes me happy. I enjoy commenting on your blog.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. I have zero idea what your work background is/was but man you are so creative! Love this post and how you see your blog in the bigger picture. I bet you end up with 150+ comments on this post and at least a few take offs!

    Liked by 4 people

    • bernieLynne, I never had a career, per se. I worked at various jobs many of which had to do with sales and marketing so that’s why I get the newsletter that I do. I hope that some people try applying this framework to their blogs if for no other reason than to have a fun goof. Not everything need be serious all the time, I do believe.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I am slow to the widow badass’ fast. This is a fun exercise.

    I started my blog as a sort of writing practice until I was sure I could write on a regular basis. I didn’t read other blogs and invite them to read mine for YEARS. That cracks me up now. Why so serious? If you have to skip a regularly scheduled time to post, so be it. I very much enjoy the camaraderie with my readers and connecting with people from all over. I like to make people laugh and life is funny so much of the time, so I enjoy sharing those bits. Over time, I’ve really appreciated the support I get too, when I decide to share something that isn’t funny . . . because as it turns out, life isn’t all fun and laughs. Thanks for the thought provoking post.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Ernie, I can understand why you kept your blog more private to begin with. The thing about blogging is that you have to do it to learn how to do it. I was more into worrying about my schedule when I first started but over the years have adopted a more relaxed attitude about all of it. I agree with you about the camaraderie that happens in the blogosphere. I didn’t expect that but I like it. Thanks for stopping by to comment. Always fun to hear from [read?] you.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. How interesting!
    Not all about the benjamins – that took me a while and some research, what with me being Canadian, and not a Puff Daddy fan. I’m sorry to say that it’s not an expression I’ll be able to adopt and drop into conversation, because I like it.
    Love your blog – with or without benjamins.

    Liked by 4 people

  11. I like what you said about doing what you do whatever flight of fancy, serious issue, or idiosyncratic form your blog posts take. I absolutely hate all of advice and rules for success offered by so-called experts. It’s all about loving what you do. If people respond, great. If not, I just keep on doing what I love to do. I’m just using different words to express what you said in your post.

    Liked by 4 people

    • David, I like your words so feel free to say them. Or write them, I guess. I’m not into all that *How To Blog* advice either. You try one thing, you try another thing, then you see what works for you. Of course I started my first blog in 2004 so there was no advice back then, just a lot of learning experiences along the way.

      Liked by 2 people

  12. I blow the kisses! Thank you for being this blogger. Your business is thriving, benjamins be damned!
    It’s one of those things that I learned and promptly forgot, like Euler circuits and cow paths. I read the first line, and was like, oh yeah, and visions of Rudolph with Island of the Misfits rushed into my head. For me, it was business writing class. I sold a wagon. Which I now realize is the last time I thought about this, because when I needed a wagon for my toddlers, much as I admire the aesthetics of the traditional red Radio Flyer, I opted for the green Little Tikes wagon, complete with bench seat storage, a door, and an ergonomic handle.

    Liked by 5 people

    • joey, after a brief search to find out what are Euler circuits, I’m with you here. From what I can tell they are a cousin of Boolean gates, something I’ve erased from my memory.

      On a happier note, this framework got me thinking about all the Rudolphs I’ve known over the years and how the woman who wrote this framework is clever. Also, I’d buy the Little Tikes wagon, too. It’s all about the ergonomic handle, in my estimation. Comfort trumps tradition.

      Liked by 2 people

    • The Travel Architect, I understand. My motivation was boredom, pure and simple. I saw the framework in the newsletter then decided to apply it this little bloggy… to see what I could see. πŸ€·β€β™€οΈ

      Liked by 2 people

  13. A kiss and a thank you right back at you. Your story of the Spectacled Bean fit right in to the Rudolph Framework. As a maybe too serious and not very clever writer, I love your blog for your imaginative ideas and clever ways of saying things.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Joni, the clever framework is from Ann Handley and I’m sure she didn’t envision it for a blog, BUT it was fun to write this tale using her prompts. I’m a goof.

      I don’t know if doing this exercise will help you decide what your blog is about, but if you do it you might be surprised. I know I was pleasantly pleased with where my tale went.

      Liked by 3 people

  14. hi ally bean!
    i am so going to join in with this for my blog.
    thanks for sharing and inviting the join in.

    my favorite line was how it is “not all about the benjamins”
    first – because that literally underpins the intrinsic motivation that drives so many of us – we put our heart into our endeavors and all that
    second
    that phrase for money was such a good choice – informal and fit so well and reminded me of a line in breaking bad “stacking the benjis”

    i already think of your blog with the “cool kids” term
    and now will think of you even more as it showed up here
    πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 4 people

  15. You summed up the benefits of a non-monetary based blog very well! And I do wish WordPress would quit sending me emails with advice on how to make more money for my business via my blog, because I don’t make any money from my blog, and I intend to keep it that way.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Barbara, you flatter me. Thanks for the kind thoughts. I’m glad you’re one of the cool kids and that you can go with the vibe of this blog. Writing this tale was decidedly playful. In February. When there’s little else for me to do.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Junie-Jesh, I felt happy answering the prompts and I think the identity of this blog is perfect as is. I’m not too deep here, but I am authentic. Try the Rudolph Framework on your blog and see what story you tell, what problem you solve!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. This may have been on of the first time I’ve been included as a cool kid. I like it. And the exercise. And that you’re a blog for the fun of being a blog. I appreciate it!!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Very cleverly done!

    The older I get, the more I dislike the Rudolph story. Santa only wanted him when he needed him. And the other reindeer were jackasses. In the cartoon, Santa was also a jackass, but to be fair, in the song he doesn’t really say anything until the foggy night in question.

    Liked by 2 people

    • J., I hear you. It’s annoying that Santa is so shallow that he only remembers to include Rudolph when Rudolph can be useful to him. And the other reindeer are snots, pure and simple. The story is as much of a cautionary tale about users as it is an inspirational tale about sharing your special ability with the world.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. At first I thought I was reading a business mission statement framework but realised you have done it again. Posted interesting content with your inimitable
    Ally slant. Your blog is light hearted and entertaining as is reading those stellar comments. Even if I don’t get the Benjamins references! The blogging community you created is a priceless treasure! (And it is independent commentary!). The freedom to write as we please on our blogs is a blessed mode of self expression.
    Don’t stop blogging!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Amanda, the Rudolph Framework is, of course, supposed to be used by a business, but it called to me to use here on the blog. I was amazed that by answering the prompts I ended up with this tale. Try it on your blog and see where you end up.

      Thanks for your kind thoughts about this blog. I like seeing what commenters have to say to what I write– and like you so rightly pointed out we have the freedom to write about what we please on our personal blogs. That takes self-expression into different directions that can be fun or serious– although I usually keep it light here. Just cuz.

      Liked by 2 people

  19. I absolutely love the Rudolph Framework. I had to scroll all the way back to the top of your post as all that was coming to mind was “thingy” – I tell you, my brain is absolute pap this week ‘cos of too much trying to sort out computer issues. I need me a nerd. Anyhoooo, I love it, I’m going to try it and not just on the usual one but the professional one too, ‘cos it’s cool.

    PS: I don’t know about the benjamins – I shall consult the big G. Google that is of course, for well brought up – but fallen – catholic girls like myself are in fear of lighting bolts πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 2 people

    • Deb, I’m glad this rang true with you. When I saw the Rudolph Framework on the newsletter I knew it’d be fun and focusing to try on the blog. I’m glad I did it. The prompts are good ones, that a few commenters have suggested reminded them of Mad Libs.

      I’m sorry about the benjamins reference. Many commenters have mentioned that they didn’t know the saying. I didn’t realize it was distinctly American. It means being completely focused on money, doing something to make money. Benjamins being a slang term for a $100 bill that has Benjamin Franklin on it.

      Liked by 2 people

      • No need to apologise, I rather like learning about the differences between our two nations who share a language. At least benjamins is way easier to understand the connection than many a cockney rhyming slang reference. One example being “Get yourself up them apples” meaning “go upstairs”, from the rhyme apples & pears for stairs (insert eye rolling emoji here).

        Liked by 2 people

  20. Aw, I missed this when you published it (because this cool kid has been having A Week, for the third week in a row), but I kinda love this. And now want to think about this idea for my own blog, which has been feeling rather fuzzy of late. I think you’ve perfectly captured what your blog is about, AND that it is what you think it is. So, you maybe didn’t need the framework, but I’m a lover of frameworks and the way they can help us think about all kinds of things.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Rita, when I saw this framework I immediately loved it. I agree with you that frameworks can help you think about things from a different point of view which is what happened here. I wrote the tale following the prompts and voilΓ  my story made sense. Kind of fun, if not a little different.

      Liked by 1 person

        • Decades ago a therapist told me I was an introvert with an extroverted personality when necessary. Today that is referred to as a ambivert. I prefer being introverted but can be extroverted when real life forces me to put myself out there. And in some ways writing this blog is real life now.

          Liked by 3 people

          • I’m an introvert too, but writing allows me to be an extrovert when I choose, emphasis on the “when I choose” πŸ˜‰ My job of the last 10 months (aka Real Life) forced me to be extroverted way beyond my comfort zone. I’m looking forward to my blog becoming real life πŸ™‚

            Liked by 2 people

            • Marie, I like your codicil: “when I choose.” ME TOO. I know that once you’re free from that job, you’ll ease into the real world of blogging where you can be as open or reserved as you want to be.

              Liked by 1 person

          • Blog writing is good for you then. I was very shy and introverted, but that was because of being uprooted from Canada and moving here at age 10. It was not just simply being uprooted from school which I loved plus leaving all my friends, I was bullied by my teachers and classmates, so I withdrew immediately, my grades fell as I hated school and I became shy. I only overcame that shyness when I began working at the diner where I had to interact with people. No more being shy and introverted – it was good for me. Now I am a homebody (but enjoy that description) but like you I have the gift of gab when necessary.

            Liked by 2 people

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