For Love Of Reading, Answering The Bookish A-Z Questions

Earlier this week Deb Carey at Debs Despatches shared and answered these questions. She inspired me to do the same today. Do this on your own blog if you like and/or chit-chat about books [or whatever] in the comments below.

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Author You’ve Read the Most Books From: Robert B. Parker’s Spenser series. I’ve read the ones written by Parker but not by the author who took over after Parkers’s death.

Best Sequel: No answer, I’m coming up blank on this question.

Currently Reading: Underground Fugue by Margot Singer

Drink Choice While Reading: Hot tea or cold wine

E reader or physical book: I prefer a physical book at home, but I use an E reader when I’m not at home.

Fictional character you probably would have dated in high school: I didn’t date much in high school so I doubt that I’d have gone on a pretend date with a fictional character. Just saying

Glad You Gave this Book a Chance: Slade House by David Mitchell. I tried to read Cloud Atlas by Mitchell and couldn’t do it, but Slade House I enjoyed. Sly premise, short read

Hidden Gem: Heart in the Right Place by Carolyn Jourdan. This is a memoir with a positive message that confirms you can plan your life all you want, but reality will intervene, especially when family loyalty is involved. It’s sweet and funny.

Important Moment in Your Reading Life: As an adult I read I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith. The novel is meant for YA but while reading it I had a light bulb moment wherein I realized I was like the main character in the novel and had been a writer since girlhood.

Just Finished: The Last Train to Key West by Chanel Cleton. Set in 1935 during a hurricane the novel is well-researched with a twisted plot. I enjoyed the characters, the odd circumstances that brought them together, and how they persevered.

Kind of Books I Won’t Read: Memoirs *written* by politicians or political hacks;  historical books about sports;  motivational books foisted upon us by grifters;  and any novel I sense will be filled with gore

Longest Book You’ve Read: A guess but I’d say Hawaii by James A. Michener. It’s about a million pages long. 

Major Book Hangover Because Of: If you mean what book stayed on my mind long after I read it, I’d say The Alice Network by Kate Quinn.

Number of Cases You Own: 4 actual book cases;  many drawers filled with books;  piles of books under the coffee table in the living room;  and many cookbooks stashed away in kitchen cupboards + on the counter

One Book You’ve Read Multiple Times: Chocolat by Joanne Harris

Preferred Place to Read: a comfortable chair with decent light and a table beside it for my beverage

Quote That Inspires You, or Gives You All the Feels, From a Book You’ve Read“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” It’s the last line from The Great Gatsby.

Reading Regret: I was slow to get around to reading the Douglas Adams’s The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series. I don’t know why I hesitated because they’re funny and brilliant.

Series You Started and Need to Finish: Elly Griffith’s Ruth Galloway mystery series

Three of Your All Time Favorite Books:

  • House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
  • Bel Canto by Ann Patchett
  • A Judgement In Stone by Ruth Rendell

Unapologetic Fanperson For: No one I can think of

Very Excited For This Release (More than all the others):  I’m never current in my reading so it doesn’t matter when an author plans to publish, I’ll get to the book when I get to it.

Worst Bookish Habit: Starting one book in one room, a different book in another room, a third book in a third room… then getting confused about what I’m reading. Go figure

X Marks the Spot—start at the top left of your shelf and pick the 27th book: Almost French by Sarah Turnbull

Your Latest Book Purchase: Bomb Shelter by Laura Mary Philpott

Zzz-Snatcher Book (the last book that kept you up late): I don’t stay up late reading so the answer is none.

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191 thoughts on “For Love Of Reading, Answering The Bookish A-Z Questions

  1. Oh, oh, oh – thanks Ally 😀

    Reading your responses I’ve realised I got my answer wrong to the longest book. Mine was actually another Michener ‘The Source’ – because I only checked my Kindle and not the tatty old paperbacks in my bookcase!

    So glad you enjoyed ‘Slade House’ – he’s another of my favourite authors but some of his stuff is WAY out there.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Deb, I enjoyed reading your answers to the questions so I HAD to do it too. I don’t know [for sure] how many pages Hawaii is, but it goes on forever.

      I agree about Mitchell. Cloud Atlas was way beyond me, but Slade House I read in one sitting on a long flight. Loved it

      Liked by 2 people

    • Hi Deb–I tried to leave a comment on your blog in response to your post, but WordPress gave me a hard time. This is what I wanted to say in response to you: I love this post! Given some of your favorites/not favorites, I’m wondering if you’ve read Tana French or P.D. James? They seem like they’d be your kind of writers. Literary mystery/thrillers, non-American. (I like them a lot.)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I think the longest book for me was House of Leaves. Unapologetic for Divergent… I really like the David Rosenfelt mysteries but my longest series was the Sue Grafton alphabet mysteries with Kinsey Milhone. When Sue died before writing Z I grieved. Books have that effect, you feel close to the characters. I agree with you 100% about what not to read.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Martha, I’ve seen a copy of House of Leaves– and that baby is thick. I’ve read a few of Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Milhone mysteries, on long plane flights mostly. Reading them all would make for a big commitment to one author. I can understand why you mourned. And yes, there are things I will not read. Same with you obviously.

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  3. First book that came to mind as the longest for me was War & Peace but that was so many years ago I could be wrong. It was fun to think of series books as well: I remember the Little House books as a kid, and a bit older- the Flowers in the Attic series -both of which I believe I did finish. As an adult I have that love/hate with the Outlander books and wonder if I will even be around to finish that series given we wait for years and years between books.

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  4. I like to read mysteries and I have read a LOT of them – always actual books, all from the library. Recently I started the Sue Grafton alphabet series again at A and find that I can enjoy them again as I can’t remember “who done it”! Same with Anne Perry’s Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series, enjoying them all over again.
    One book I loved that is not a mystery is West with Giraffes, based on a true story set in 1938.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ellen D., I adore your realization that re-reading the Grafton alphabet books will work for you because you don’t remember who done it. That’s how I’d be with the Miss Marple mysteries, if I tackled them again.

      I’ve heard of West with Giraffes, but never read it. Will add it to my TBR list… which means I’ll get to it in about another decade. I am a slow reader.

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  5. I didn’t read “I Capture the Castle” until I was maybe forty. Hilarious and such a love letter to England in the 1930s. Great escapism (my favorite). When we traveled to the UK, we stayed in a castle for two days and so of course that was the title of my blog post about it.

    Aside from that book, your reading list is very different than mine, which is littered with SFF and mystery and some biographies. How would you describe your favorite type of book?

    Liked by 2 people

    • AutumnAshbough, British castles are fascinating. Smith’s novel proved that. I can understand why you titled your blog post like you did. You had to, in fact.

      I’ve never been asked this question before… I’d say I like well-developed characters, a plot that moves forward to a reasonable conclusion, and a topic that throws in a bit of history, a bit of psychology. I don’t know what genre that is but that’s my answer.

      And I favor women authors, having read too many books written by men while in college. 🤨

      Liked by 1 person

      • I hear you on male authors. A book has to be HIGHLY recommended by a woman reader for me to try it if it’s written by a white man. There’s a reason why there are entire Twitter accounts mocking men who write women. And SFF is, unfortunately, rife with white males who are still living in their parents’ basement while worshipping Lovecraft and Tolkien.

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        • I didn’t know about the accounts on Twitter, but I can understand their popularity. I don’t know when I implemented my guideline about women authors. It’s been a good one that provides a balance regarding points of view that my English major lacked.

          Liked by 1 person

  6. This is such a fun survey! Loved reading your answers. You don’t stay up late reading?!? And you have books in drawers — that is so charming to me.

    I am going to fill this out and post it. I AM. (I am terrible at updating my book blog.)

    Liked by 2 people

    • Suzanne, I don’t read into the night anymore. I find that I don’t dose off if I have a book in my hands, so instead I play games of my phone that put me straight to sleep.

      Please do answer the questions on your blog. It’s intriguing to read everyone’s answers. We’re all unique– and therein is the fun.

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  7. I think the longest book I’ve read was “…And Ladies of the Club,” by Helen Hooven Santmyer. I enjoyed it, as I did Hawaii, and Sarum. When you finish a book that long, it must have had something going for it. On the other hand, I’m struggling to finish John Irving’s “The Last Chairlift.” Just not catching me, needed editing down, and I really wanted to like it because I’ve enjoyed many of his other works, and because he was my son’s wrestling coach!

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  8. Morning, Ally! I’m with you about the Great Gatsby quote. All the feels!
    I’m going to take some time to digest all the good stuff you’ve shared – this was fun to read! And…I enjoyed learning that you fancy a comfy chair and a good beverage…along with ample lighting. Some days, if the “conditions” are right, I can read just about anything if I’m in my spot. Ahh. 😉

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  9. I write about books a lot but usually only what I’m currently reading or what I DNF – so many books read over a lifetime how does one have a favorite? Books I pass over? Memoirs tho I have flipped through autobiographies I prefer biographies. Inspirational (?), self-help, ooga-booga, touchy-feely, Let me tell you how to live your life books – No.

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    • Grace, I don’t know how to have one favorite book either. And even among the ones I’d call my favorites, my opinion changes. I like memoirs, taking them for what they are, a subjective point of view about one part of someone’s life. Kind of like a blog post… expanded.

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  10. I also have multiple books I’m reading at once, depending on my mood and other factors. I’ll have at least one audiobook going to listen to while I drive or do chores, and several paper books laying around the house. And I don’t stay up late reading, either. It really irritates the parrots and they wake me at dawn as pay-back!

    Liked by 2 people

    • KDKH, oh I’m loving how your parrots keep you from reading late. This could be the most charming reason I’ve ever heard about why someone doesn’t read in bed.

      As for reading multiple books at once, in theory it’s a good idea, but as I’ve aged I’ve begun to wonder if it is. Perhaps I’m keeping dementia at bay, OR perhaps I’m contributing to it… 🤔

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  11. I find so many of these questions hard to answer! I also really enjoyed I Capture the Castle, which I read during pandemic lockdown, I think. It was sweet and old-fashioned, and I like a good old-fashioned book. Especially one set in England. Your description of Hawaii made me laugh; I remember that big, fat book on my parents’ bookshelf. Never tried it myself. (I took off that shelf Capote’s In Cold Blood, as an elementary school student. Hawaii would have been a better choice.) I also concur with your choice for reading beverages of choice. If only we lived closer to each other, we could have a reading party in which we’d each have a comfortable chair, an excellent beverage, and time to read. Maybe we’d talk about our reading at some point, but we wouldn’t have to. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Rita, I wish I knew who told me to read I Capture the Castle, but I don’t and feel like I owe that person a heartfelt “thank you.” It’s an old-fashioned novel in the best way possible.

      I pulled Hawaii off my aunt’s shelf, and lugged it around with me forever but I did finish it. I like your theoretical idea of reading together, but not needing to talk about our books. That’s a lovely charming introverted idea! 🤓

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    • Jean, I’m the same way about my reading tastes. Even five years ago my answers would have been literary *deep* books instead of the lighter fare I gravitate toward now. I get you about not always remembering the titles and authors of books you liked. Don’t tell anyone, but I had to look up a few of those deets in order to answer these questions.

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  12. Thanks for sharing your answers. I may pass this quiz on as well. Chocolat is one of my favourites, too and I’ve always thought that the last line of The Great Gatsby captures so much about the human condition in just a few simple words. But that’s what great writers do. Great post. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Lynette, thanks for joining in here in the comments. I like questions like these because they get me re-thinking about what has influenced me. The last line of Gatsby is one that resonated with me the first time I read it– and that was in high school.

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  13. I love your answer on the number of cases you own. We’re much the same. Multiple book cases, and then there is the books in the kitchen, the living room, bureau drawers, etc. We refer to the books as organized chaos. Physical books > E-books all day long for us. We read enough on our phones. When it is time to devote time to a book, gotta have the actual book!

    Liked by 2 people

    • walkingoffthechessboard, I’ve always lived with lots of books around me so it seems normal to keep them wherever they fit. Glad to know you’re the same. I agree about reading physical books versus on a screen. I prefer the former, but accept the latter when I must. Plus any way I can find to use my phone less makes me happy. I’m tired of the darned thing.

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  14. Ooooh Bomb Shelter!!!

    This was so fun to read, Ally. Maybe I’ll do it myself! What fun. I love books and boy did I just finish a VERY POOR ONE. It was purported to be all about how books get us through tough times, and it was not at all that. I don’t often hate on books BUT I SHALL MAKE AN EXCEPTION FOR “BOOKENDS.”

    Do you ever get nervous that you will say you hate a book and then someone else will say they loved it and will be mad at you for it? I mean, I never do that myself…if someone doesn’t like my favourite books I just chalk it up to differences in taste, but some people take it very personally. I have had this happen! Anyway, I just got a little nervous that I said I disliked “Bookends” and someone else is going to be upset with me. I cannot help it, I like what I like!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Nicole, I read your review of Bookends on IG, a book I’d never heard of by an author I’m not familiar with, and I thought your review was balanced and authentic. You didn’t like the book for sound reasons, then said so.

      BUT I do know what you mean about someone getting pissy with you for not liking what they like. Some people take everything personally so you can’t win if your opinion is different than theirs. Heck you often can’t win with people like that even if you agree with them… 🙄

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Fun post. I’m hopelessly captivated by A-to-Zs and I’ll definitely have to give this one a try. But in the meantime, I’m enjoying your responses. You’ve given a number of new titles/authors to check out. I’m not sure that’s actually a good thing though as I already have a mount of TBRs still to be tackled. I seem to be residing in an inexplicable anomaly where no matter how many books I read the remaining piles never seem to decrease. Such a delicious problem.

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    • Deborah, yours is a delicious problem to be sure. I know how you feel. I read slowly and I always have more books I want to read than the ability to read them. I can see how these questions appeal to you, knowing your penchant for the alphabet.

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  16. Love Robert B. Parker and have read every book, even the faux ones. (they are sometimes meh but there is a hint of the humor) I enjoy most of Rendell’s works and some of them would be top of my list. “Anna’s Book” stayed in my mind for a long time. I’m a big Galloway fan although I’m sad that Griffiths is ending the series in her next book. There are several authors I read that are finishing up long running series with their latest. 😦

    Liked by 2 people

    • Margaret, great way to refer to those *other* Spenser books, the faux ones. I’ve only read the one Rendell book because it’s considered a classic mystery that turned the genre on its head. I’m thinking I’m going to wait until the last Galloway mystery comes out, then binge read all of them in order. I’ve jumped around with them, so feel I have little grasp of the timeline.

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    • Jan, at least reading about Hawaii in the middle of the snowstorm might make that book go faster. It seemed almost interminable to me. The Spenser mysteries are light reading, something to pick up when you want escapism with reliable characters who always solve the mystery. I have enjoyed them over the years.

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  17. I love getting to know people through their books, and I especially love it when our choices overlap. I never read books more than once, but I actually did make an exception for Chocolat, as I loved it that much. I also don’t watch movies, but had to see Chocolat, particularly because of Johnny Depp.

    Motivational books are also a hard pass for me. I’ve read all of David Sedaris’ books, and again the exception of reading a few multiple times, like Holiday on Ice to get through the holidays!

    I just finished Big Girl by Mecca Jamilah Sullivan about a morbidly obese girl growing up in Harlem. It’s about body image among black women. Fiction, but meaty.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Bijoux, it’s funny you mention not re-reading books because Chocolat is one of the very few I ever do that with. I saw the movie, too– for the same reason.

      I understand how motivational books can come on too strong or weird, I don’t lean toward them. I like David Sedaris, but had forgotten about him so thanks for the reminder.

      I’ve not heard of Big Girl, but it sounds like it tackles a timely issue, I hope in an image positive way.

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  18. My longest book was Centennial by James A. Michener. I’m sensing a theme here about his books and length! But I remember LOVING it (I think it was over 1,000 pages – I would never tackle something like that at this stage in life, but as a late-teen I remember sitting in front of the wood stove and devouring the book; I had also watched the mini-series so was quite invested in the story)!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Elisabeth, yes there is a theme. I remember the mini-series [sort of] but never entertained the idea of reading Centennial. After I conquered Hawaii, my love for him waned. The dude was wordy, I’ll say that. 🫤

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  19. I added some of your reads to my to-be-read list:

    I Capture The Castle
    Last Train to Key West
    A Judgement in Stone
    Slade House

    I enjoyed Cloud Atlas, but had to work at it ~> I watched the movie, then read the book, then watched the movie a 2nd time, then read parts of the book again.

    We have the same idea when it comes to preferred place to read. 😀

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    • Nancy, I gave up on Cloud Atlas, never bothered to see the movie. You are a more dedicated woman than I. Slade House is a fast read, but I did like the story. Hope you enjoy the other books, too. Happy reading 🤓

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  20. Ah, one of my favorite topics – reading. I always have a book or two going at the same time. I prefer regular books but right now I’m waiting on some books so I’m using a tablet. When we made a cross country move about 18 years ago, I donated all my books and gave away my bookshelves. When they tell you how much they cost per pound to move, it tends to encourage you to downsize. I also don’t read a book a second time so I found that my local library is my best reading buddy. I get notified by Goodreads about authors I like bringing out a new book, head to the library website, put a hold on it, and they email when it’s ready. If they don’t have it, they buy it for me. When I’m done, I drop it off. I LOVE it! I’ve read all the Spenser books, and the news ones are good too. I average reading a hundred books a year, and when I update my library list, I always smile at how much money I saved. I could keep writing on this topic, but will stop so I don’t put you to sleep.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Judy, I’d not pay to have all our books shipped across country, but they’re here so why not enjoy their ambiance? I know a few other people who do what you do: request a book from the library, get it as soon as it is published, then read & return. I bet you’re making good money by not buying those books yourself. Smart thinking, of frugal one! I’m a slow reader so your 100 books per year is impressive.

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  21. “…Hawaii by James A. Michener. It’s about a million pages long. ” That made me laugh. Aren’t all of his books about a million pages long? This reminded me of when I read “Texas.” It came in two volumes and when I got to the end of the second volume, there were about 40 pages missing!! All that reading and no ending.

    You read some interesting books. I also have books in different rooms and understand how confusing it can be at times.

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  22. I enjoyed this post but, you know what, most of the books you mention I’ve never heard of. Just goes to show there’s a lot of publishing going on. What would make this questionnaire difficult for me is I’ve been listening to audiobooks more than I’ve been reading books. I listen when I go for my walks or to the gym, when I clean house, and for a little bit when I go to bed. The rest of the time I’m working on my computer or knitting while watching TV or talking with my husband. The last time I sat with a book and just read … I was on an airplane. Somehow, that just doesn’t seem right.

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    • Marie, I see your problem. These questions assume you read a book, not listened to it. I don’t know if that really matters, but there’s an issue there.

      I often find that someone will mention a book or author I’ve never heard of. With all the self-publishing anymore publishing houses don’t control the narrative like they once did. We read what we find to read, NYT best seller lists be darned. Word of mouth is usually how I find books.

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  23. I knew you were a reader, but I didn’t know you collected/kept all your books. Or at least enough to fill some bookcases. I used to keep them, but now I only hold onto a few that I love and want to share with people.
    If I had to look for the 27th book, I’d have to go to the girls’ old playroom shelves, which might be a Dr. Suess book. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Suz, over the last few years we’ve gotten rid of about half of our book collection, so to me it seems like we’re living light. If nothing else books are great for decorating. I’d love it if your 27th book was Dr. Suess. That’d be fun.

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  24. Hi, Ally – Your “Will Not Read List” is exactly the same as mine. Also, books filled with horror (both psychological and physical) do me in. Six years ago I read ‘Devil in White City’ for book club. It still gives me nightmares – literally!

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  25. Well, what a compendium: “The Complete Guide to Ally’s Book Life.” I liked Edith Wharton and some other authors you list. The last book I’ve read from my library stack, My Life: Growing Up Asian in America. Worth my time.

    No horror or politics for me either, although I made an exception for Michelle Obama’s Becoming.

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    • Marian, I hadn’t thought of these questions as being anything other than a fun diversion, but now that you say it “The Complete Guide to Ally’s Book Life” has a wonderful ring to it. Makes what I wrote here seem more significant than it is.

      I read Becoming too and didn’t think of it as politics– and isn’t that interesting? I thought of it as a memoir written by someone I admire, albeit she happened to be a First Lady. When I think of political books I think of seedy people and duplicitous behavior, not what Michelle is about at all.

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  26. I loved reading your reading list. Interestingly, I think there’s only one or two books on your list that I’ve read. As I’m typing this I’m wondering if I could come up with the list I’ve read. I don’t think so. I do remember though that life was so enriched by good literature.

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    • Robin, you hit the nail on the head about answering questions like these: everyone’s answers will be wildly different and that’s what makes posts like this fun. I bet you could answer these questions more easily and quickly than you think. I know I did, just tossing out the answers off the top of my head instead of laboring over every word like I usually do. 🤓

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  27. This is a fascinating post – with a bunch of books to be added to my “to read pile” – damn you!!
    I can’t believe how few books we have in common…
    As I read your responses, I tried to think of what mine would be. Hmmm… Looks like I am going to have to write my own post. My sister told me I had too many books. What the hell does she know, anyway? I just had to schlep them all from the main floor to the basement in preparation of my renovation. I donated 6 boxes of books this time; 8 boxes when I moved from my old house to here and I still have four book cases full…
    Reading is the best thing ever.

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    • Dale, I think your realization of how few books we’ve read in common is the point of this exercise. I answered the questions candidly, not expecting anyone else would have the same answers. And therein is the learning aspect of doing questions like these, insight into other people. If you do this on your blog I’ll be fascinated.

      Your sister is confused. Like you we have lots of books around the house, too. That’s how I grew up with books [and journals and magazines and newspapers] EVERYWHERE. We did downsize our collection a few years ago, but books are my friends so I couldn’t let too many of them go!

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      • Yes, I love that, actually. And now, all your fault, I shall take a break from purging and moving and write mine! Like you, I can only be candid.

        I told her so. She knows not of what she speaks. She is an avid reader but not a keeper of books. She borrows and returns. Doesn’t get that thrill of creating one’s own library. It was extremely hard to let some go but I had to be honest with myself, knowing full-well they would never be re-read or, in some cases, read at all. How many Stitchery, Quilt, Calligraphy, etc. books does one need? Stupid “Crafters Book Club” I belonged to – cost me a fortune for naught!

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        • YAY! Answer the questions, be yourself, have fun. [That might be the subtext for this blog now that I write that.]

          I know what you mean about having too many books, usually reference ones, that are no longer current or useful or even pretty to keep around on the coffee table. We had ones for interior design and gardening and travel that needed to move along to where they’d be appreciated. Plus many classics from my college days were no longer welcome here.

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  28. Impressive amount of book cases, Ally. I used to have books everywhere and now I only have them in most places because I’ve been busily donating books to the library every year or so when I embark on some kind of spring (or fall, or winter) ritual. The last haul I donated about 50 or 60 books. The time before that 113. And still I am awash in books, but that’s okay because I will never be book free. ;0) Happy Friday!

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    • Eilene, thanks for the compliment. Most of the answers came to me instantly which is unusual for me, She Who Overthinks Everything. I forget lots of the books I read, too. I figure that’s okay at least I passed the time pleasantly with them for a while.

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    • Christie, this was a fun to do knowing I wouldn’t be graded on my answers. I’d like to read Lessons in Chemistry and am adding it to my TBR list. I know of it, but you’re the first person who has mentioned reading it. Thanks for the idea.

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  29. Well this is so fun. I am twins with you in:
    A. Did not date much in high school. So could not imagine a character I’ve read that I would date.
    B. I don’t read things when they just get released so it does not matter to me . . . I’ll get there eventually.
    I enjoy memoirs, so I must now look for the heart is in the right place one. If I drank wine while reading. I’d go right to sleep.

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    • Ernie, glad you enjoyed this. It’s one of those blog posts that appeals to a segment of people who follows along here, but not everyone. [And that’s okay.] The question about high school dating almost threw me for a loop, but then I came to my senses and went with truthful. Hope you like Jourdan’s memoir. Her take on life resonated with me.

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  30. Pingback: For Love Of Reading, Answering The Bookish A-Z Questions | A Dalectable Life

  31. These are great questions, Ally. I feel like I know you a little better seeing what you’ve read and reading your opinions here. We have something in common – Bel Canto! What a great book. I haven’t read The Hitchhiker’s Guide…yet. Currently drinking two different cups of hot tea (long story but one is to keep me from falling asleep before 8 pm). Hope you have a great weekend!

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  32. I enjoyed reading your answers but would never post a similar list. I have a particularly bad memory for book and movie plots/subjects… always have. I remember a bus trip I took with some friends years ago. They spent much of the trip quoting movie dialog while I sat there wondering if I had even seen the movie. I’m pretty sure that I haven’t read any of your all-time favorites, though, so I may add them to my library list.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Janis, I understand what you’re saying. I don’t remember all the books I read– and when it comes to movies I see so few that I’m lost when it comes to quote trivia or character analysis. I just say “huh” and smile.

      The thing about all-time favorites is they change. For me, for everyone. Hope you like these if you get to them, and I promise they’ll be no discussions on the subject matter after you read them. Forget them all you want. 😉

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    • Natalie, once in a while I like to answer questions like these, keeps my brain clicking plus many readers [not all] enjoy posts like this one. I hope you get to read Bel Canto. I found it fascinating and memorable.

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  33. Fun post, Ally.

    I remember reading Bel Canto and absolutely loving it! I think my children read it, too. And the Hitchhikers Guide series. Someone I knew in grad school recommended the books. I started reading the first book and kept laughing, so then my husband read them, too. Good memories.
    I read Cloud Atlas after I saw the movie, and I also read his Bone Clocks.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I’ve read all the Robert B. Parker Spencer novels as well. I loved the books. The T.V. series…not so much. I read one of book by the person taking over the Spencer series and never read another. It just wasn’t the same.
    Tied with Robert B. Parker are Martha Grimes’ Richard Jury series books. I’ve read all those some more than once.

    I reread poetry books the most not so much novels any more.

    The 27th book in the “Literary” bookcase in the living room is The Oxford Book of Essays. I haven’t finished it. I have 4 bookcases and each has a theme of sorts. Have you done that with your bookcases? When we moved I took all the books out of my nightstand and haven’t put any back in I also shed two bookcases along with the books. He-Man’s nightstand is full of books!

    I’m in between books at the moment. I just finished Book 7/13 of a Sci-Fi series by Joshua Dazelle so before moving on to the next book in the series I am going to read my latest purchase The Evil You Choose by Dan Antion. I’m on a roll reading lately. During the lockdown in the time of Covid-19 I couldn’t get my mind to focus on a book. It’s nice to be back at it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Deborah, I know what you mean about the Spenser TV series. I watched it, but it didn’t have the same charm and intrigue as the books. I read part of one of the Spensers written by the new person and tossed it aside. It seemed wrong to me, I felt disloyal.

      Our bookshelves are sort of organized by theme, but not really. At one point I had a grand plan that’d have made Dewey decimal proud, but now I generally put the books I like the best in the bookcase in the home study and the books Z-D is keeping upstairs on the shelves in the bedroom we’ve refashioned into a reading room. All other books roam free.

      I had the same problem during the lockdown, but now am back to reading in my own slow, and enjoyable to me, way. I’ll be getting no awards for most books read.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Yay! A great idea for a post! Doing this for this coming Wed! 🙂 thanks for the idea and will link back! Also, sadly I have not read any of your books you’ve listed so will need to scope those out on Goodreads!!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Ah, yes. James Michener. I later discovered David McCullough, whose books are probably the same length. But when you finish a Michener novel there’s definitely a sense of accomplishment. I did read Hawaii and enjoyed it. “The Drifters” is another one I liked. – Marty

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    • Marty, I only read the one Michener novel, then felt like I’d put my time in and was free to not read any more of his books. I’ve not read anything by McCullough, but I know the name. I read in the shallow end of the library!

      Liked by 1 person

  37. Oh Ally, you leave me in the dust with your reading. I was such an avid reader for nearly 30 years when I took the bus to Downtown Detroit daily for work. I’d open my book as soon as I got on the bus each way, lest anyone bother me. I always had a jacket cover so no one asked about the book, wasting my valuable “reading time” (a reading snob or maybe snub is a better word). I’d read on my lunch hour as well. My mom/I would pre-order best sellers from our library once they were reviewed in “People” magazine or the Sunday “Parade” magazine, etc. We checked themout back to back, so two weeks for Mom, then two weeks for me. She’d hurry so I had more time if needed. I have never been able to read in bed or after the workday when I worked on site, even when I was younger. Reading is one thing that will be top of my list when I am retired. With work, walking, blogging/photography, it does not leave much time, though I know other bloggers manage it. I’ve read only two books this year “The Return” by Nicholas Sparks over New Year’s holiday and “The Hotel Nantucket” by Erin Hillebrand this Summer. There are books in tubs my mom/I bought that she read, but I did not. I read “Hawaii” and saw the movie and I remember reading “Passage to India” for school and I thought I’d never finish it, but I just looked and it is only 368 pages.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda, I don’t read for pleasure like I used to either. Older eyes + a house chores + blogging + goofing off = less reading. BUT I enjoy what I read now more than when I was constantly reading. I’ve never read anything by Sparks or Hillebrand, but know of them. The best thing to come from this post has been learning about new-to-me, or forgotten, authors. I saw the movie Hawaii, too– before I read the book in fact.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You have a point – you savor the books more, the less you read. I saved the post to try out some authors as well when I have more time. Hopefully Z-D likes to read so you still get some quiet time to read. Or after his retirement you’ll walk – I know you wanted to walk more in 2022. Maybe finally the heat is behind us and contractor woes, so a good time to walk.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Funny you mention the walking thing. We’ve been talking about how together we’ll be more inclined to go for walks regularly. We want to explore city and township parks all over the region which requires a lot of driving. Together fun, alone… I’d be lost all the time and muttering. Better to have fun.

          Liked by 1 person

          • I think you’ll like it and it’s a perfect season for starting those hikes Ally. I feel like that with some of the Metroparks in the northern counties – it is not like driving all the way up to northern Michigan, just going 30 miles each way, but I am not good with directions … remember the sunflower farm trip a few years ago? You’re going to go explore some parks with a companion which is nice. I am envious. Also, you might like to try snowshoeing in some of those parks in the Winter. I know several people have suggested it to me and I may look into it down the road, just another item to put on my list of things to do when retired.

            Liked by 1 person

              • My boss has a friend in Michigan’s UP and when he visits there in Winter, he goes snowshoeing in the forest and loves it. He has sent me pics of him out on a trail (and then a pic of just his snowshoes). I’d try that before skiing where I’d likely take a tumble and break something.

                Liked by 1 person

  38. What fun! You named many books and authors I haven’t tried yet, and now I have some recommendations. My own taste in books is unique, and many of the books and authors I enjoy most have never made the best seller list. But that’s okay, they speak to me and that’s all that matters. As for what kind of books I refuse to read, your list is the same as mine, only I’d add to that any book that has a very strong MESSAGE that it wants to impress upon me, the clueless reader. That’s a huge turn off!

    Like

    • Ann, the thing about reading for pleasure is that everyone reads different books and genres– and it’s easy to forget that. If nothing else answers to these questions show how varied we all are. I know what you mean about books with a MESSAGE. They bother me [another clueless reader], too. But I’ve come to realize some people like to be told what to do– and those books fill the bill.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. I still haven’t gotten around to reading The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series. I started reading the first part 2 years back but just couldn’t get past the first 25 pages despite trying 3-4 times. Maybe I’ll give it another try so that it I don’t regret not reading it.

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    • Happy Panda, The Hitchhiker’s Guide series hit me right at the right time. I was in a VERY SERIOUS place in my life and the oddball humor in the books was a needed counterbalance. If I re-read them today [which I’ve no plan on doing], I don’t know if I’d like them as much now as I did then.

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  40. Ooh this is a cool tag! Absolutely agree with you on The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – it’s one of my regrets as well, haha!
    I’d love to do this tag of it’s okay with you!

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    • Deepathy, feel free to answer the questions on your blog. They’re fun but ended up being more of a candid insight into who I am than I realized they’d be. If you link here I’ll go read your answers. Thanks for stopping by to comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  41. Pingback: Reading and Books- A to Z – A Grace Full Life

  42. I love Edith Wharton. “Age of Innocence” is a masterwork, and while spare,”Ethan Frome” is so laden with exquisite symbolism and irony that it is heart-wrenching.

    I’m still in a book hangover from reading “Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell, and I read it well over a year ago.

    That quote from “The Great Gatsby”–so beautiful and profound. I loved every time I taught that novel. The colour symbolism in that book adds so much meaning. And this passage: “They were careless people…- they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.” Remind you of anyone?

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  43. nance, I read Age of Innocence in college, but it didn’t draw me in like House of Mirth that I read decades after college. Of course that might be a reflection of who I was then, versus who I became later on.

    The last line of Gatsby is one that grounds me and reminds of the profound impact words can have on your soul. As for your question about the quote you mentioned, HELL YES it reminds me of someone– and all his vile toadies.

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  44. I think my brain fog is fogging up my ability to answer those questions. I’m glad you did all the homework and scored well on the Q&A! 🤣😆 My reading has been on pause to finish projects, but when winter arrives, I have uncovered all the YA books that my daughters read that I’m curious to read and see why they may have enjoyed those books enough to box them up and store at mom & dads for nearly a decade. Happy reading to you!!!

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  45. Pingback: Reading A to Z | Light Motifs II

  46. Good on you for answering those! I will chime in with a few answers:
    Author You’ve Read the Most Books From: Agatha Christie. I have no idea how many of hers I’ve read. Just about all of the ones I could find. Maybe 80? I’ve read 40 of Terry Pratchett’s books.
    Currently Reading: Several books, including The Impossible Destiny of Cutie Grackle by Shawn K. Stout; Dune by Frank Herbert; Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra by C.S. Lewis. Why on earth so many books? I just wrote a proposal for a book to discuss fantasy and science fiction books. If the publisher accepts it, then I will need to brush up on some sci-fi and fantasy books I’ve read before. I’m doing that now.
    Drink Choice While Reading: Hot tea
    E reader or physical book: I prefer a physical book

    Liked by 1 person

    • L. Marie, I’ve read a lot of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple series but I don’t know how many. It was in college for a class, but now that you mention it… 🤔

      You are reading a lot of books simultaneously, yep. I couldn’t do that, but I understand why you are. It’s more like research than reading exclusively for pleasure. I hope your proposal is accepted.

      I prefer a physical book too. E readers make me cranky, but I use one sometimes in specific situations.

      Liked by 1 person

  47. These are such intriguing questions. I read the first Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy book when I was 12, but I read it in Dutch so I still need to read it in the original language. I’ve heard that the sequels get weirder and weirder.

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  48. Pingback: Questions and Answers about Books A to Z!!! | lifelessons – a blog by Judy Dykstra-Brown

  49. Pingback: For The Love Of Reading – Paper Hearts

  50. Yikes. Great questions and your answers are fascinating. How I’d like to sit in a room filled with books with you and some cups of tea and just “TALK BOOKS.” I’ve read most of the ones you mention here. I know my answers would be different than yours, but it would take me an hour to remember and write it all down, so I’m going to enjoy vicariously through you. THANKS for this. Really fun.

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  51. Pingback: This looked fun – Verbose Lady

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